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mnoutain bkie rdier
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
AZ.MTNS said:
Remove brake pads , push pistons back , replace brake pads .
Pistons can not go any farther back than they already are. The pads are nearly impossible to get back in. Developing mild case of tendonitis trying to do this....taking years off my life perhaps...

Really. Disc brakes are over rated where I live. I race XC in So. Cal. I want my V-brakes back. I have successfully built many o' bikes.....this part never done. Always had someone with a bit more patience do it for me. Just reminded myself why.

Rant over.

Now what?

Oh...did I mention that I want my V brakes back dammit!!
 

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rydbyk said:
Pistons can not go any farther back than they already are. The pads are nearly impossible to get back in. Developing mild case of tendonitis trying to do this....taking years off my life perhaps...
!!
When changing out old pads, the recommended way is to spread the pistons with the old pads in place to protect it..that's because it takes some force to spread the pistons apart, and the old pads will protect them from damage while you pry them open......I typically use a hefty flat-head screwdriver, the thickest and longest one in my toolbox, and I rock it back and forth using the edges of the caliper for leverage.....

My experience is it shouldn't matter how much fluid is in your system, retracting them just takes some muscle to the point where you think you might actually break them (hence why you do it with the old pads inside)
 

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mnoutain bkie rdier
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
mullen119 said:
Have you ever bled the brakes? sounds to me like there is too much fluid in the system and that is causing the pistons to not get pushed back all the way. You may need to remove some fluid.
Pretty sure I am going to go back to my trusty simple mech. disc brakes. There was NO rub before I removed the pads today. They worked just fine. They were simply worn down is all.

I just don't see the advantage for an XC racer to use hydros in So. Cal. You?
 

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rydbyk said:
They were simply worn down is all.
that is exactly the problem. As the pads wear thinner the hydraulic brake automatically compensates and extends the piston further and further so the brake will still feel the same and engage as quickly as with a thicker pad.

This means it is normal to have to spread the pistons back out when replacing with new pads, and many many people have run into the same thing and made it through just fine. Having to learn new mechanical tricks can certainly be frustrating, but its no reason to throw them out and walk away. Try what osmarandsara said and see if that helps
 

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rydbyk said:
Pretty sure I am going to go back to my trusty simple mech. disc brakes. There was NO rub before I removed the pads today. They worked just fine. They were simply worn down is all.

I just don't see the advantage for an XC racer to use hydros in So. Cal. You?
The reason I Like hydro's is once they are set up, You can pretty much forget about them. Good mechanicals have good power and feel, but I have found that you need to tinker with them. As I said in my last post, If you bled the brakes before(or had a shop do it) with worn pads, You can have to much fluid in the lines. There is only so much fluild that can fit in the system and if you bleed with worn pads, You add fluid when the pistons are pushed out some. That can cause the pads to not be able to be pushed back all the way. If the brakes have never been bled, they should be able to get pushed back all the way with a screw driver using the old pads as said above. If you can't get them figured out, take them to a local shop and have them do it.

If mechanical discs will work for the type of riding you do then go for the switch back. Its much easier to fix mechs on the trail then hydros and bb7's can feel almost as good as hydros.
 

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mnoutain bkie rdier
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Fixed it. Sometimes just stepping away for a day is the best solution. It really was a complete and total PITA getting the brake pad "sandwich" in on the rear brake. In hindsight, I would have removed the brake to get an unobstructed approach to it.

I ended up installing one pad at a time, while using a credit card to pry the clip out a bit.

I never could get the outward piston to completely go back in. There is a tiny tiny rub that won't go away.

The horrible noise is gone for now at least...hope the Kool Stop organics stay quiet!!:thumbsup:
 

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I think you need to open system, push pistons out, install spacer to hold pistons out (with old pads still in), bleed system and replace fluid.

As for Discs in socal, socal has some steep hills. On the other hand, V brakes work great, and and are often underestimated. If you like them, nothing wrong with using them.
 
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