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Thicc Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
White Ind CLD+ rear hub, one year of use. Drive side hub bearing is a 6902, felt like gravel. Enduro brand.

I order a new SKF Made in France bearing, $30. Smooth as butter in the hand.

Press out old bearing. Huh. It feels pretty smooth now.

Use my digital calipers on the bore but the hub shell is slightly too deep to get a solid reading.

Press in new bearing, didn't seem too hard to get in.

Spin with finger. Feels like gravel.

Press out new bearing, feels like butter.

Double check my press setup, everything is good. Carefully press in SKF bearing. And no, my machine is not touching the inner race.

Feels like gravel.

Next step....acquire machinery to properly measure bearing bore hole, correct?
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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Well that sucks...probably more common than we know across more brands, where people complain about blowing out bearings and others in the same conditions never have any issue. Not "common" by any means, but I'd hedge this accounts for some of these stories when no other cause seems apparent. Also based on watching Hambini measure and press-in BB bearings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Very well gentlemen, that will be the plan. The next time I get a flash of motivation I'll look up the clearance ranges for the press fit and find a way to measure the bore. The bore is anodized...could be a simple matter of too thick anodizing. That would be nice. Hambini has shown the technique where you polish the bore, but of course one must first measure.
 

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Very well gentlemen, that will be the plan. The next time I get a flash of motivation I'll look up the clearance ranges for the press fit and find a way to measure the bore. The bore is anodized...could be a simple matter of too thick anodizing. That would be nice. Hambini has shown the technique where you polish the bore, but of course one must first measure.
Doug White will actually pick up the phone at the shop, so maybe call&ask for the intended clearance?

Yes, measuring is important, and you should, but worth a call all the same
 

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I'd hit the inner shell ( where the outer race of the bearing seats) with some fine sandpaper ( lightly, maybe a burr or something) and maybe the outer race of the bearing too.

It's also very possible the bearing is not seating square in the shell...infact that would be my first thought over tolerance. Is there another bearing in the shell with a floating axle between the 2 bearings? If so I'd try replacing both bearings in hopes that might square both up.

Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using Tapatalk
 

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FWIW, when I was resto-modding my Ellsworth last year I decided to replace all the pivot bearings (Enduro w/blue seals) as they felt pretty crunchy. Upon removal, one of the main bearings was rusted and definitely shot but the rest were smooth. I used Enduro MAX Black Oxide replacements, and out of the box they were all silky smooth. After install they weren't so smooth. So it was either bearing seats in chainstay/rocker not being perfectly round or slightly undersized, or Enduro bearings being slightly over sized. When I researched the issue it seemed to be more common than I expected, as not too many MTB's are made with aerospace level tooling/tolerances 😜
Which further validates the idea that costly high precision bearings are unnecessary in an MTB application, because to have any benefit the entire system needs precision, not just the bearing.
 

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I'd hit the inner shell ( where the outer race of the bearing seats) with some fine sandpaper ( lightly, maybe a burr or something) and maybe the outer race of the bearing too.
I had this problem with my pivot bearings. After confirming with too sets of bearings that they became crunchy when installed into frame, I used some fine sandpaper to enlarge the bore. I did it in small steps, pressing bearings into frame and checking the smoothness between steps. For final assembly I used bearing compound (Loctite 641 which was also used by the manufacturer).
 

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since 4/10/2009
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I'd probably be more prone to sand the bearing rather than the bore, but that's just me. the bore will wear a little over time, anyway, and loosen up the more you press bearings in/out.

I know a guy who actually replaced a frame because he'd changed PF bearings so many times that the bb shell was too loose. I'd rather not accelerate the process.
 

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Disgruntled Peccary
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Yea. All it takes is a dull cutter, too much anodizing etc.. but I've got WI hubs, and I'd be calling them to see what they say. You're well within the 5 year warranty.
 

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Wanna ride bikes?
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I don't yet have an interest in a warranty claim.
But if you run a piece of sand paper on the hub shell you will void your warranty. Giving them a call so they have a chance to address the problem is the first logical step. It's a good company, they'll help you get it taken care of.
 

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Wanna ride bikes?
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Calling a company for customer service does not equal a warranty claim.

It's an interference fit. It is not at all uncommon for a worn bearing to feel gritty while in the hub or suspension pivot. Once you pull it out it often feels good again. That doesn't mean the bearing is not cooked though.
 
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