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Don't touch me!
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My Ultimate stand's clamp is adjustable, so it works just fine as long as you don't gorilla-fist it (you should know waaaaay before it will do any damage); have no experience with any other manufacturer's clamps.

For regular maintenance, there shouldn't be a problem clamping carbon. I'd more worried about sharp edges in contact with it than anything else. For heavier torque/impact stuff (bb & HSet installs or removals) I'd go with a dummy post just to be on the safe side.
 

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Beeristasty shacked it; I completely agree.

I would just add that if I'm not doing front-end maintenance, I set the stand up so that the front wheel is resting on the ground. Maybe it's just peace of mind, but that takes a little additional pressure off the seatpost.

But, yeah, routine manitenance hanging in the bike stand is fine; just don't "store" the bike like that.

Cheers, Chris
 

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beeristasty said:
My Ultimate stand's clamp is adjustable, so it works just fine as long as you don't gorilla-fist it (you should know waaaaay before it will do any damage); have no experience with any other manufacturer's clamps.

For regular maintenance, there shouldn't be a problem clamping carbon. I'd more worried about sharp edges in contact with it than anything else. For heavier torque/impact stuff (bb & HSet installs or removals) I'd go with a dummy post just to be on the safe side.
i have an ultimate clamp also. how can you tell if youre over tightening? my bike can still swivel side to side in the clamp, but i dont want to tighten it more cause it already seems pretty clamped down.

i dont have a carbon post, but how long would be too long to leave up? ive left bikes up there for a while; i thought it was okay for storage. my seatposts are aluminum.
 

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If my bike is under my butt on the trails, and not on the car hitch rack, it's clamped by the seatpost in my ultimate stand. I tighten to the point of no spinning and it's firmly in place. I never stopped to hesitate to the same on my carbon seatpost on my roadbike. Either I need to start being more careful...or you guys are worrying too much. I wouldn't worry about overclamping an aluminum post...as mentioned, you'd need to really gorilla fist that one. As for the carbon post, I'd think common sense must be used. It's just like clamped with the seat collar..."tight enough...is tight enough."
 

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snowdenn said:
i have an ultimate clamp also. how can you tell if youre over tightening? my bike can still swivel side to side in the clamp, but i dont want to tighten it more cause it already seems pretty clamped down.

i dont have a carbon post, but how long would be too long to leave up? ive left bikes up there for a while; i thought it was okay for storage. my seatposts are aluminum.
You'll know when you know... it's hard to explain. Kind of like when you know a bolt is about to strip. Of course, you shouldn't get anywhere near that point, unless you're a little overzealous with an AL bolt. But back on topic. I always tighten the clamp to the point where the bike can't rotate left/right while in secured. You can go a good bit past that without damaging anything, but it won't serve any purpose. And remember, bike parts are a lot sturdier than you think.

I have stored my bikes on my repair stand for years with no ill effects. I now have the super-awesome Ultimate Velo Cache to store the important bikes now. Riding puts way more stress (as in exponentially to the n-th degree) on the post than leaving it clamped in a stand. And similar to Chris130, I let the front wheel make contact with the floor whenever possible.
 

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Although it'll do nothing to stop a ham fisted mechanic from cracking a carbon seatpost (which is next to impossible anyway), a clean rag wrapped around the seatpost will protect the carbon finish from getting marked by the rubber as well as provide more friction in the clamping surface. This allows you to use less pressure to get the same amount of grip on the bike. As far as longevity of a seatpost thats holding a bike in a stand goes, conisedering some of these seatposts are subjected to a couple hundred pounds bouncing and flopping around all over the place, the weight of a bike is pretty miniscule by comparison.

Finish Strong,

Adam
 

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Assuming your repair stand is not a dodgy home made job with a metal clamp with teeth you will be just fine clamping onto a carbon post. Don't forget your post gets ridden already clamped in the seat tube. The force required to crush or snap a carbon seat post would be huge.

Stop stressing and and wrench away with that bad boy....

HillBilly
 
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