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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello,
i finally got my bike out and went biking a couple days ago for the first time.
it was a good thing that i just put some jeans and an old sweater on cause i ended up moving about a dozen small trees off the trails, but there were bigger ones that i couldnt move, cause they were over a foot wide.
has anyone ever took a saw or small axe along biking incase you ever run into fallen trees? or see one then for the next time?
 

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silky saws

I usually carry a folding Silky Pocket Boy saw for up to 5" logs, I recommend the course tooth blade. They also have larger ones like the Gomboy http://www.silkysaws.com/ . A lightweight pair of loppers can also be useful, I use Corona StrataShear3 AL 8020 http://www.treequest.com/default.asp?MENU=P&ID=17

Roam said:
hello,
i finally got my bike out and went biking a couple days ago for the first time.
it was a good thing that i just put some jeans and an old sweater on cause i ended up moving about a dozen small trees off the trails, but there were bigger ones that i couldnt move, cause they were over a foot wide.
has anyone ever took a saw or small axe along biking incase you ever run into fallen trees? or see one then for the next time?
 

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Log off and go ride!
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Have you ever tried to buck a 12+" tree with a hand axe? You can do it but I think you would rather spend the day riding than chopping.

It is far easier and faster to make a note of the location of all the trees you cannot handle yourself and come back another day with a buddy and a chainsaw.

Or give the list to the landowner or administrating agency and let them decide how to clear the trail -- whether letting you do it or doing it themselves. Large trees may have commercial value and bucked wrong can ruin the value of the tree. The owner may want to salvage the log.
 

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First check with local land managers or clubs who do trail work on the trails you ride before removing trees.

If a tree is rideable, removing it may tick some folks off.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
next time i go biking, which will probably be tomorrow, i'll take my camera
and snap some pics of the bigger trees which fell over on the trails.
most of the bigger trees are 12" and around knee height.
a few of them looked rideable, kind of like hopping on and over a bench.
 

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my local Wal-Mart...errr, ahhh... Sportsman's Warehouse has these critters for a bit cheaper than they are at the Ben Meadows online web retailer, and they work like magic, excellent swedish steel blade that burns through what we get 'round here (mostly fir, ponderosa, lodgepole, larch, willow, cottonwood). I cut a few 8" diameter in no time at all. haven't had reason to use it on larger.

Saw-Vivor Collapsible Buck Saw: http://www.benmeadows.com/store/product_group.asp?dept_id=7027&parent_id=301
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
gonzostrike said:
my local Wal-Mart...errr, ahhh... Sportsman's Warehouse has these critters for a bit cheaper than they are at the Ben Meadows online web retailer, and they work like magic, excellent swedish steel blade that burns through what we get 'round here (mostly fir, ponderosa, lodgepole, larch, willow, cottonwood). I cut a few 8" diameter in no time at all. haven't had reason to use it on larger.

Saw-Vivor Collapsible Buck Saw: https://www.benmeadows.com/store/product_group.asp?dept_id=7027&parent_id=301
that actually looks like it would do the trick pretty easy.
i'll check the... local warehouse.. to see how much something like that would be.

i have a few bow saws, https://fog.imageg.net/graphics/product_images/pFOGXREF2-358509reg.jpg
but i wasnt ready to take one of those biking for three hours just for one tree thats knocked over.

has anyone heard of a pocket chain saw?
https://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?memberId=12500226&productId=13553
i laughed at the idea when i seen it. i wonder how good it works...
 

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Nine said:
A buddy of mine has one and says they are REALLY good. He claims to be able to cut through a pretty large diameter branch in no time at all. I know, looks silly, but hey....very portable and lighter than heavy metal.
I've heard similarly from WW kayakers who carry them as safety devices on their boats, primarily creek boaters I"m talking... but they have always given the caveat that the link saw cuts very well FOR WHAT IT IS.

in other words, NOTHING that compact cuts as well, short of lasers and military tech.

I strongly considered the link saw before buying the buck saw I linked above. experience with a real saw blade teaches that the link saw is good FOR WHAT IT IS. ;)
 

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Let sleeping logs lie

Depending on the intended skill level of the trail, you might just want to leave the logs where they fall. If it is a beginner trail, I would probably cut any log higher then about 8 - 10 inches, but on more advanced trails, you can have logs up to about 2 feet high.

Before you cut or move anything, check with the owner/builder/maintainer/main rider of the trail, as they have the final say in how it develops. If they give you the go ahead, scout it all first. If the logs that need to be cut are small (8 inches or less) you can use a folding saw. I use a Gerber with a 10" or so blade. It cuts like a hot knife, weighs next to nothing, folds smaller then a mini-pump, is cheap, and has replaceable blades. Damn good trail saw. Bigger logs require a real bow saw, or chain saw.

Note also that building log pyramids for taller logs is not always the best way to go. With a little practice you can hop most logs up to about a foot high, without hitting chainrings or stopping your forward movement. Practice, practice, practice. If you do build up log pyramids, use ONLY logs and dirt, not rocks. People will fall, but they won't really get hurt if it is just wood and dirt.

Thanks,
Erik (of Erik's Over the Log Trail)
 

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Roam said:
hello,
i finally got my bike out and went biking a couple days ago for the first time.
it was a good thing that i just put some jeans and an old sweater on cause i ended up moving about a dozen small trees off the trails, but there were bigger ones that i couldnt move, cause they were over a foot wide.
has anyone ever took a saw or small axe along biking incase you ever run into fallen trees? or see one then for the next time?
In addition to what others have mentioned, also consider whether or not the log is creating a natural waterbar. If it's on a hill, prone to erosion because the poorly constructed trail runs strait down the hill, leave it if it is collecting sediment and topsoil behind it or diverting water from the trail tread.

Conversely, if the trail is relatively flat and/or the log angled the wrong way (trying to force water up hill), remove the log. Often this kind of log will cause a mudhole to form on one side of it. Also, if the log is causing people to select an alternative route, widening the trail, through a "sensitive" (ie wetland or near a lake bank) area, remove the log.

Hope that helps balance your options. Not all logs should stay just because they are cool to ride.
 
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