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Hello all!
I just got spare rotors (centerlock hub compatible), and I wanted to install them on my bike. My bike already has a set of centerlock rotors (verrrry used), and I wanted to swap them with the new ones.

But I am very new to bike repair.... so I was stuck right after taking the front wheel off.... I have no idea as to how to remove the rotor from the hub. I checked out the park tools website, and it says that I need to use a cassette lockring tool... any alternatives to that?

Any help will be greatly appreciated!
 

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Get your freak on!
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2,696 Posts
Buy the cassette lockring tool - there is no other 'safe' way of removing that lockring.

I'd also reccomend you buy a lockring tool that says it's designed for centerlock use - shimano and park have these... the cheaper brands you will find may not work on the rear wheel due to clearance issues.
 

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SpoK Werks Handmade Goods
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1,199 Posts
I have a slightly different problem along the same line. I loaned my Dyno equipped front wheel to a friend who then mounted his rotor on the wheel. I am now in need of the wheel and can't remove the rotor. Seems whomever mounted it tightened it with what seems to be a hammerdrill.

Any ideas? I've used a fair amount of leverage in an attempt to remove it but I'm afraid that I'm going to strip something.

It does turn the same as 'normal' threading right (righty tighty, lefty loosey) or am I dilusional?
 

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1 Speed said:
I have a slightly different problem along the same line. I loaned my Dyno equipped front wheel to a friend who then mounted his rotor on the wheel. I am now in need of the wheel and can't remove the rotor. Seems whomever mounted it tightened it with what seems to be a hammerdrill.

Any ideas? I've used a fair amount of leverage in an attempt to remove it but I'm afraid that I'm going to strip something.

It does turn the same as 'normal' threading right (righty tighty, lefty loosey) or am I dilusional?

Yes it does, right-tight, left-loose. You have two choices for breaking the lock ring loose. The two we use in the shop are as follows. You can use a 1" socket. Simply set the lockring tool in the lock ring, the hexed portion of the tool should be 1". Get a 1', 1/2" drive socket and a 1/2" dirve handle and apply to the lock ring tool. This should give you more leverage, longer handle, etc. While standing, set the wheel down at your feet and let it lean against your legs. Put one hand over the head of the handle to hold the lock ring and socket in place, with the other hand apply pressure to the handle. You should be able to break it loose. If that doesn't work you can always add a breaker bar to extend the socket handle and afford more leverage. Another method that works well is a 16" cresent wrench applied to the lock ring tool and adjusted to fit properly. You can use a considerable amount of force on the tool and lock ring. They're pretty tough. I would also suggest that you get a torque wrench and use it when your reinstall the lock ring. Torque spec on the lock ring is only 40Nm. It shouldn't be that hard to break loose. Somebody really over torqued it. Not a good thing for the hub or the lock ring.

Good Dirt
 

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Pimpmobile
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487 Posts
Clamping the lock-ring tool in a vise, and using the wheel for leverage works pretty well!

Just be sure the tool is seated properly.
 
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