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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,excuse the dumb question but i am trully dangerous with spanners and allen keys.
Ive ordered a pushed rp3,which is due this week.Is it just a straight bolt off bolt on affair,or is there anything else i should know?
I have tried a search but cant find what im looking for.Thanks for any help.
 

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Trampelpfadbenutzer
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Should be Plug´n´play.
Simply bolt of your old shock, pop out the reducers, plug them into the new shock mounts and bolt on.Set pressure and rebound and go out riding.Have fun!

Later
RaD
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When you say "the reducers" do you mean the spacer type thingys between the eye of the shock and the rocker? Also does this meeting of surfaces need any lubrication when putting it back together? Believe me,if theres any way of cocking it up,ill find it!
 

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Trampelpfadbenutzer
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Yup,with reducers I mean the spacer things.
Normaly those spacers that fit into the shocks bushings does not need to be lubed, at least I have never lubed them.
Do not be afraid, you CAN do it. ;)

Later
RaD
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Cheers RaD. Yep i spose confidence is the key and its because of my past attempts that im lacking in that area.I recently managed to strip the thread on my xtr crank arm when swapping pedals.Cost me a whopping £110 to replace.
 

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Lay off the Levers
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RaDs got it. You don't need lube the reducers (spacers.)

More info than you need:
Believe it or not we had discussion on this waaay back. (not worth searching for it) The bushing surfaces in the metal insert in the eyelet are self lubricating. As they wear the derbris actually serves as dry lubricant sort of like graphite.

The Recucers are clamped between the rocker ends and frame tabs. The clamping force binds each reducer face against the other and each end against the mounting face to act like a single shaft fixed on each end. It does not rotate. As the rocker arm and shock swings through their arcs the reducer shaft rides on the bushing insert in the shock eyelet.

Long story short, pull it apart, put it together, and then, as we say in NY, fuhgetaboutit.
 

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Bite Me.
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mudpluger uk said:
Cheers RaD. Yep i spose confidence is the key and its because of my past attempts that im lacking in that area.I recently managed to strip the thread on my xtr crank arm when swapping pedals.Cost me a whopping £110 to replace.
The shock removal and replacement is as easy as it gets - just unscrew the bolts and then install your new shock and retighten to the proper torque spec (4.2ft/lb 5.6 Nm). If the PUshed shock does not come with the proper reudcers (the silver press in fittings that mount on the top and bottom of the shock body) you will need to remove the existing reducers. The material is soft aluminum and will mar if you use pliers on the bare metal. Wrap the reducer in several layers of masking tape then use pliers to twist the reducer out - press into the new shock until properly seated. Do NOT use lube on the reducers or the mount to the frame and rocker. 5 mins.
 

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Bite Me.
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Bikezilla said:
As they wear the derbris actually serves as dry lubricant sort of like graphite.
Funny you shoudl metion that BZ - despite my prior comment I have actually been expermenting with powdered graphite lube when swapping shocks. I started using it on the wheels of my son's Pinewood Derby car (anything to win). It's so slick and dry I thought it might be good for the reducers and shock mounts. So far it seems pretty good.
 

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cutthroat said:
Funny you shoudl metion that BZ - despite my prior comment I have actually been expermenting with powdered graphite lube when swapping shocks. I started using it on the wheels of my son's Pinewood Derby car (anything to win). It's so slick and dry I thought it might be good for the reducers and shock mounts. So far it seems pretty good.
That stuff works good inside of cable housings too. YMMV :)
 

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Bite Me.
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SSINGA said:
That stuff works good inside of cable housings too. YMMV :)
Really? I usually grease the cables with Slick Honey - I would think the graphite would gum up the works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks everybody.

I can happily report my new shock is now on my bike.An operation that passed without incident.The shock did indeed come with the aluminium spacers,ready to go.
 

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Lay off the Levers
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cutthroat said:
Really? I usually grease the cables with Slick Honey - I would think the graphite would gum up the works.
Talk about gum. Slick Honey turns to tar inside my housings. I use Pedro's dry-lube now.
 

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"El Whatever"
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cutthroat said:
Funny you shoudl metion that BZ - despite my prior comment I have actually been expermenting with powdered graphite lube when swapping shocks. I started using it on the wheels of my son's Pinewood Derby car (anything to win). It's so slick and dry I thought it might be good for the reducers and shock mounts. So far it seems pretty good.
Just use gloves using stuff like that... graphite powder is goddarn difficult to remove off the hands.
 
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