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Elitest thrill junkie
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Not useless, but not as useful as a rear lockout. The rear lockout will help you whether you are pedaling out of the saddle or in. IME, the front lockout only really helps pedaling out of the saddle when it's smooth, and even then it's not a huge difference in forward speed, but it is nice to have the front not moving when you are thrashing about trying to get every little bit of energy to propel you forward. Also, you are going to need to be a pretty elite racer for this to make any discernable difference in time/placement.
 

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furker
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It depends. How smoothly do you pedal out of saddle and climbing? What kind of riding do you do? How rough are the trails you climb?

There are two main categories of remote lockouts. The first category is a full lockout that will only allow a few mm of travel (aside from a threshold for big hits). This is really, really good to have for:
1) First few minutes of a race start where sprinting to the front of the pack before reaching single track makes or breaks your position for the rest of the race.
2) Last sprint of a race where the leaders duke it out to the finish line.
3) Completely smooth trail surface out-of-saddle climbs.

The second category of remote lockout doesn't lock out fully, it just adjusts to a firmer setting. This is good to have for:
1) Climbs that have any bumps
2) Quieting bob if your hard pedaling is... How do I say this kindly? Not smooth. Square. Like a jackhammer on the suspension.

If you don't race, have a smoother pedaling style that doesn't induce bob, and are able to find a Goldilocks suspension setting that works for you everywhere, you probably can do just fine without a remote or changing suspension modes at all.

If you just want a suspension mode for riding on asphalt when not on trails, a remote is probably overkill. You can adjust the suspension setting with the levers on the suspension while on asphalt and not bother with a remote. I personally prefer a firm setting over full lockout for asphalt. Others like full lockout.

But in the end it is down to personal choice and nobody can decide what you will like.
 

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Ive removed all of my lockouts over the years. I found no measurable improvement even on street climbs. Most of our climbs in races are loose and I am better suited with the traction provided by an open rear suspension and we don’t have any smooth climbs.

30 miles road commutes to trail are a regular event for me.

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am used to the Scott Rideloc 3-position remote. But it seems that both the Sid SL Ultimate and the Fox SC 32 have a 2-position lockout.
I usually ride with the Medium and Open modes, never the Locked one, which leads me to think that a remote lockout with only Open and Locked positions would be useless to me.
 

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I am used to the Scott Rideloc 3-position remote. But it seems that both the Sid SL Ultimate and the Fox SC 32 have a 2-position lockout.
I usually ride with the Medium and Open modes, never the Locked one, which leads me to think that a remote lockout with only Open and Locked positions would be useless to me.
Technically you should be able to set this up. Where closed fork = medium shock.

Tune fork first. Leave shock line very slack as you dial in the throw. The shocks have a stop which will allow this, or at least Fox shocks due. This is of course if you have a Push-to-lock fork.

At the end of the day, I went with the manual lock Sid ultimate. Cleaner bar setup. Lost a heavy remote and the lever to lock your fork on the road is the EASIEST to throw locked of any fork I have ever owned.

Also, fork lockouts get stuck locked quite frequently without care in bad conditions. I also forget to unlock my stuff all the time while in the moment. End up riding locked out for quite some time. I spent an entire morning on my feet sorting out two stuck lockouts at Snowshoe nationals. Bad idea day before race!

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I can live without a remote lockout but for some people they are a must.

A couple of things to keep in mind, is they make the front end of your bike messy and your they are another thing to go wrong. If you regularly ride in the wet I would avoid them all together. I spend a lot of time trying to make remote lockouts work after super muddy rides.
 

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I like fork lock out. Besides the lack of front bob it calms the entire bike there fore not always needing to lock rear. Once the front starts bobbing its hard to calm the wave. I do tend to run my fork soft too and that allows for soft or very firm. (root courses especially)
 

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I never use my lockout on the hardtail: when you're climbing or pedaling really hard, most of your weight should be biased towards the rear and you'll be getting minimal fork movement, think about how light your front end is while climbing. I race my hardtail in cyclocross races pretty often, fork never locked out, I really don't think it would help if locked out. Racing side by side with cx bikes ridden by some of the same guys I race xc with, it would probably be obvious if there was an advantage to being rull rigid.
The Rockshox/sram dual hydraulic lockout on my fs bike defaults to 'lockout' when any air gets in the button, I wish it would default to not locked out, and I wish I could delete the lockout, but I don't think I can, - I'm getting pretty good at bleeding the lockout...
I also know at least one guy (maybe two) who often forgets to unlock before descending, - one more thing for the race-brain to forget to do.
 

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Rides all the bikes!
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While I am one of the slowest guys there, I am racing in the elite field. I do lock my fork out at certain occasions, but I am looking for every slight bit of advantage I can find just to keep up! But through some experimentation years ago I found that there were a lot of situations where not locking out was actually faster, so I am not running locked a whole lot.

My last XC bike didn't have a remote lock. While it was easy to lock manually, I didn't do it very often and I don't feel like I was winning or losing ground much for it.

TL;DR: If you don't feel you need it, then skip it. Cleaner bars, less to worry about.
 

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I have a remote lock out on the fork on my XC bikes. One is an Epic with rear brain and Fox 32 SC front and the other is a singlespeed HT with Fox 32 SC. On the singlespeed the lockout is critical. When standing and grinding locking out the fork means more power transfer to the pedals and you can feel the difference. Some times the climb is too rough and you have to leave it open, but most of the time when standing the lock out is best.

On my Epic it is very different. Most of the climbing is seated and there is not much benefit to lock out the fork. I have noticed a very slight climbing improvement on smooth climbs with front locked, but I rarely need it. However when standing climbing it is nice, but you don't do that much on gears for the most part. Short punchy stuff is easier to just lave it open. However come to a finish line sprint on smooth ground and yeah I will lock it out. Might get my a half bike length and that could make a difference.
 

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I find with a 120mm fork (and 110 or 120 rear), remote lockout becomes a must-have for XC racing, regardless of territory, just too sloppy without it. Marathons aren't as intense, but then again you may have long road sections that'll require it.

You can get away without remote lockout in most situations with a 100mm bike, but it is nice to have. Specialized Brain is nice but takes a lot of tweaking to dial in on the front. Specialized should really consider putting the brain into their Evo, that'd be quite a race weapon in the 22 pound range.

If you were to build up that bike or other down country bikes to race, consider the time and cost involved. I previously converted a Tallboy 3 CC to dual-remote and it required sending the shock back to Fox.
 

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Anyone here experienced a rear shock lock out that doesn't return? My bike is fairly new but lockout on rear shock can get sticky or doesn't return fully.

I'm suspecting cable and outer housing are already contaminated?
 
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