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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone know of a cardiologist who specializes in treating athletes with arrhythmia? SoCal based would be cool but not essential. I'm currently seeing a highly qualified and recommended rhythm specialist but she seems a bit lost when I ask her training specific questions. I think she's more in tuned to working with patients in their golden years.

Any input is appreciated.

Art
 

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bleeding eventually stops
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hmm

arturo7 said:
Anyone know of a cardiologist who specializes in treating athletes with arrhythmia? SoCal based would be cool but not essential. I'm currently seeing a highly qualified and recommended rhythm specialist but she seems a bit lost when I ask her training specific questions. I think she's more in tuned to working with patients in their golden years.

Any input is appreciated.

Art
Just because I'm nosey, what exactly is your arrythmia? You want a electrophysiology cardiologist, which is what it sounds like you have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
dr.dirt said:
Just because I'm nosey, what exactly is your arrythmia?
A-fib sometimes a-flutter. I had my mitral valve repaired about three years ago. At the time I was in a-fib. Since then it will occasionally go out of sinus rhythm. If I watch what I eat or drink it's usually OK.

However, sometimes during a ride it will go out and this is most distressing. It goes back into sinus an hour or two after the ride is over, but once it goes out the rest of the ride is shot. I'm rubber legged and goose lunged.

This is where my doctor seems out of her element. Thankfully she's not guessing, she just indicates she not sure what is causing it. I'm just curious if there may be a cardiologist with experience in this area.

Art
 

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arturo7 said:
A-fib sometimes a-flutter. I had my mitral valve repaired about three years ago. At the time I was in a-fib. Since then it will occasionally go out of sinus rhythm. If I watch what I eat or drink it's usually OK.

However, sometimes during a ride it will go out and this is most distressing. It goes back into sinus an hour or two after the ride is over, but once it goes out the rest of the ride is shot. I'm rubber legged and goose lunged.

This is where my doctor seems out of her element. Thankfully she's not guessing, she just indicates she not sure what is causing it. I'm just curious if there may be a cardiologist with experience in this area.

Art
I'd deifnately go see an electrophyiologist. Your prob know but your problem involves a part of the atrium having some irritable tissue that at times gets triggered and gives you your AF. Usually these tissues are around the valves, so the history with valve repair is not surprising. A electrophysiologist can do special study where they can find out exactly where this focus is during your AF and potentially ablate it using a variety of different techniques, typically radio waves. Does not always work but does have the potential of essentially curing you of your AF. You sound like an ideal candidate for the procedure.
 

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I'm scheduled for an RF ablation in about 3 weeks. I'm guardedly optimistic that it will help. Obviously, it would be a great day if the a-fib could be completely eliminated. From what I understand, the rate of success depends on the location of the anomaly.

It would be way cool be off the medication. It would be even better not worrying about losing NSR on a lung-busting climb.

On a side note, I just picked up a Polar HRM for the purpose of post ride HR review. I was thinking a high HR might be triggering the a-fib. On ride A I went into a-fib after hitting 173 bpm. Ride B reached 178 with no occurrence. So much for that theory.

Art
 

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Your instinct that it may be rate related does bear out with many types of arrythmias, typically pre-excitation sydromes like WPW and LGL. AF certainly can be triggered under the same priciples but often it is more or less random.
Good luck with the ablation, it's a very safe procedure. Obviously scary though when you let people fiddle with your hardwiring.
 

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Referral!!!

Art,

Do not go ahead with the ablation until you talk to this guy

Warren M. Jackman, MD
Cardiology University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Cardiac Arrhythmia Research Institute

As I understand it, he is the leading arrhythmia authority in the country. He's the expert you probably want to talk to.

I know it might take sometime to get an appointment, but I know from my own medical conditions, I will only go to the best from now on.
 
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