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I'm 59, and in pretty good shape. I typically hike, bike, and paddle at least 3-4 times a week for 75-90mins at a time. My intensity level is always "high" or in the 80% range. I've been doing this for years, and readily admit I've never tried to be scientific at all about what I do-I just do it.

I recently got a Garmin Fenix watch...and after going on one of my typical hikes (that I've done hundreds of times) with the watch, it displayed the Garmin version of "DANGER DANGER WILL ROBINSON!!! YOUR EXERTION LEVELS ARE EXTREMELY HIGH AND COULD BE HARMFUL WITHOUT ADEQUATE RECOVERY TIME!

My watch doesn't know me well yet, but it did get me wondering about my intensity levels and their relationship to recovery time. I never really vary my intensity level at all, partly because I find it boring and difficult to go at an "easy" pace. But I have noticed a somewhat wide variation in how I feel from one workout to the next-some workouts I feel great...others I'm struggling through the workout.

I do recognize that many factors affect performance (sleep, diet, stress, etc.) but I have this hunch that I may be depriving myself of adequate recovery time...and/or shouldn't be going hard for every workout. So I'm curious to hear what others are doing?

One final observation: I've noticed that if I just stop all workouts for several days (or even a week or more), then do another workout, I feel GREAT! In other words, it feels after long pauses that I've allowed my body to FULLY recover, and I notice that! But I don't want to limit my workouts to once-a-week (I'd go crazy!).

Thanks!
Scott
 

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How many hour per week? Generally I think if you're doing 3 or 4 rides a week you can do about whatever you want and be ok but 4 really tough rides in the same week may be a bit much.

I'm on a structured plan for racing and usually ride 3 hard days a week and 2 easier ones totalling 9-12 hours.2 days off the bike.
 

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Im just avid rider, i generally follow something like that. Weekends are my do what i want mtb rides, one or both may be pretty hard. Monday usually off the bike. Tuesday easy road, no big hills or intervals, spin. Wednesday hard, usually a hill climb. Thursday easyish. Friday off. Main thing is to vary it up. If i do something really hard, in my age i notice it takes me at least two days to feel body is in recovery. For example when i hit snowboard slopes, first day after starting doesnt feel to bad, but the second day after the body really feels the aches, then after that feels on the upswing.
You already noticed what recovery does for you when you took a week off and came back feeling super.
Try finding a different activity to keep interest. If you work different muscles that can spread recovery around.
And on easy days, stop to smell the roses. If you come across another rider, smile and chat instead of feeling the urge to sprint and drop them in the dust! Pick a scenic route, i often ride along the beach.
 

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I don't give it much thought.
Just turned 69 last week.
I mix up hard rides with easier ones riding with my wife. That actually has done wonders for my fitness, so recovery rides must be good.
I'm sure I'm on the low end of what you guys do. My goals are 1200 miles of trail riding and 150,000 feet of climbing per season (April - October). I don't ride roads. I can't get past the combo of boring/dangerous. According to my tracker, I've been averaging 4 rides per week. All my Wasatch rides start and end about 7100 feet. They go up....then they go down! I ride Deer Valley a few times a summer, but I don't record those.
In the winter, I'll generally get in 80 or so days of skiing telemark at the resort, but I rarely stay there past about noon. Maybe 15 or so hard runs, then go home and nap.
I have a recliner that I'm in love with!
 

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2 days off and 2 hard days. Too much HI your body will simply not recover in those two days. I think this is bad for your heart long-term but I am no doctor and I'm in my 40's. For whatever it is worth I see more improvements doing long-term low intensity.
 

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If I've learned anything in riding with a heart rate monitor, it's the importance of resting between workouts, and that quality workouts rule over just quantity.

Keep in mind, though, that riding a bike hard is harder on your heart than running, where joints give out sooner than the cardiovascular system. Excessive cardio at an advanced age can be dangerous.
 

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Im 52. Getting back into shape. Started at 232 in May. Im. 187 now. Getting to about 180. Im 5’10” tall. I exercise daily. I bike about 3 times a week and run the other days. I used to change my workout to not be too stressful days in a row. Well last week i did a paced 18 mile ride and it was one of my best efforts as far as times go, and the next day I did a trail ride of 13 miles and it was my fastest on the trail ever. Climbs i would stop on I powered through. Then the next day I ran the fastest time in a year over 3 miles. Is that sustainable? No. But as your body gets stronger you can do more. When i have tired legs then intake a day off and then get back into it. I think mixing up the workouts helps your muscles recover because you will be using different muscles. Im going to start shortening my runs and add in weight training on the running days. We will see how that goes as I get close to goal weight.
 

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Im 52. Getting back into shape. Started at 232 in May. Im. 187 now. Getting to about 180. Im 5'10" tall. I exercise daily. I bike about 3 times a week and run the other days. I used to change my workout to not be too stressful days in a row. Well last week i did a paced 18 mile ride and it was one of my best efforts as far as times go, and the next day I did a trail ride of 13 miles and it was my fastest on the trail ever. Climbs i would stop on I powered through. Then the next day I ran the fastest time in a year over 3 miles. Is that sustainable? No. But as your body gets stronger you can do more. When i have tired legs then intake a day off and then get back into it. I think mixing up the workouts helps your muscles recover because you will be using different muscles. Im going to start shortening my runs and add in weight training on the running days. We will see how that goes as I get close to goal weight.
You are awesome.

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Start monitoring your rest and sleep heart rates to gauge where you are in your recovery. Generally it will be higher if you aren't recovered.

For me starting at 44 years old I needed more recovery time and for the last 15 years its been a downhill slide. To ride 3-4 times a week I've cut my mileage in half (compared to 15 years ago) to keep from breaking down too much. This year I've notice I am starting to loose my strength, I cannot lay down the peak watts I used to. Growing old sucks.
 

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I'm 59, and in pretty good shape. I typically hike, bike, and paddle at least 3-4 times a week for 75-90mins at a time. My intensity level is always "high" or in the 80% range. I've been doing this for years, and readily admit I've never tried to be scientific at all about what I do-I just do it.

I recently got a Garmin Fenix watch...and after going on one of my typical hikes (that I've done hundreds of times) with the watch, it displayed the Garmin version of "DANGER DANGER WILL ROBINSON!!! YOUR EXERTION LEVELS ARE EXTREMELY HIGH AND COULD BE HARMFUL WITHOUT ADEQUATE RECOVERY TIME!

My watch doesn't know me well yet, but it did get me wondering about my intensity levels and their relationship to recovery time. I never really vary my intensity level at all, partly because I find it boring and difficult to go at an "easy" pace. But I have noticed a somewhat wide variation in how I feel from one workout to the next-some workouts I feel great...others I'm struggling through the workout.

I do recognize that many factors affect performance (sleep, diet, stress, etc.) but I have this hunch that I may be depriving myself of adequate recovery time...and/or shouldn't be going hard for every workout. So I'm curious to hear what others are doing?

One final observation: I've noticed that if I just stop all workouts for several days (or even a week or more), then do another workout, I feel GREAT! In other words, it feels after long pauses that I've allowed my body to FULLY recover, and I notice that! But I don't want to limit my workouts to once-a-week (I'd go crazy!).

Thanks!
Scott
57. Every other day works pretty well. I use strava/Apple Watch and it does not complain, but my heart rate is definitely in the upper zones. Never learned to ride easy, I guess. Happy it does not complain though.

I definitely feel more rested after 2 days rest though. I think I just adjust my effort unless I am riding with a group.

I am wanting to do some travel riding and need to try some more 2 on 2 off cadence, so that I can take advantage of the cool places I hopefully find.

Cheers!
 

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I go with what I feel in my legs. After long rides I might need two day or more days away from the bike. I still take a nightly walk with my daughter between a mile and two miles a night, but we might avoid the hills.

Today's (Friday) ride follows a good ride on Wednesday, the plan was the same course (road 16 miles), but a poor night's sleep (up reading and writing for an assignment), had me shortening the ride by about two and half miles (the hilly miles) as I just didn't have it in me. My younger self, wouldn't have been as wise. I have a planned ride on Sunday with the daughter and some family friends so the girls can get ride together. Bike path stuff, it should be fun.

With changes to my schedule I plan to ride more. I'm not going to kill myself, but I do think I'll see improvements.
 

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I'm 59, and in pretty good shape. I typically hike, bike, and paddle at least 3-4 times a week for 75-90mins at a time. My intensity level is always "high" or in the 80% range. I've been doing this for years, and readily admit I've never tried to be scientific at all about what I do-I just do it.

I recently got a Garmin Fenix watch...and after going on one of my typical hikes (that I've done hundreds of times) with the watch, it displayed the Garmin version of "DANGER DANGER WILL ROBINSON!!! YOUR EXERTION LEVELS ARE EXTREMELY HIGH AND COULD BE HARMFUL WITHOUT ADEQUATE RECOVERY TIME!

My watch doesn't know me well yet, but it did get me wondering about my intensity levels and their relationship to recovery time. I never really vary my intensity level at all, partly because I find it boring and difficult to go at an "easy" pace. But I have noticed a somewhat wide variation in how I feel from one workout to the next-some workouts I feel great...others I'm struggling through the workout.

I do recognize that many factors affect performance (sleep, diet, stress, etc.) but I have this hunch that I may be depriving myself of adequate recovery time...and/or shouldn't be going hard for every workout. So I'm curious to hear what others are doing?

One final observation: I've noticed that if I just stop all workouts for several days (or even a week or more), then do another workout, I feel GREAT! In other words, it feels after long pauses that I've allowed my body to FULLY recover, and I notice that! But I don't want to limit my workouts to once-a-week (I'd go crazy!).

Thanks!
Scott
Fenix?

I'm 72 and usually ride 5 days a week for 90 to 120 minutes. Distances on a mountain bike are in the 10 to 15 mile range with 1000 t0 1500 feet of climbing on technical but not super difficult terrain. My road rides range from 20 to 30 miles with a lot less climbing.

I track what I do using Strava on my phone. When "smart" watches first came out I asked a techie friend what benefit they would be and his answer saved me a lot of money. "None!"

I find that the occasional three days off really helps in my recovery but one day off every couple days works too. I mix mountain with road rides and the road rides are less demanding and somewhat of a rest day without missing a ride.

Come winter the bikes are put away and I ski five days a week and follow the same off time as riding but my skiing is all Alpine. Off season, I may use my wife's trainer every once in a while but I save that more for spring when I will return to my riding.

At my age and in my physical condition, it works. I check my weight and BP every morning and that is as good an indication of my condition as anything else.

At 72 I probably can't keep up with someone in their fifties. That is reality and I'm fine with it.
 

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The fitness books say we need exercise, nutrition, and rest, to see gains. We always mess up on one of them. Yes, rest and recovery is as important as the other two. It is more important as we age.

But if you don't care as much about gains (in fitness), you can ride hard as often as you want. I can see wanting to ride more and giving up some gains.
 
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