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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hoping to post this question in the correct forum, can anyone please recommend good clip-in pedals?

Last week my head, shoulder and back said hello to the friendly streets of Los Angeles during a front tire blowout and i am now somewhat hesitant (scared) again to switch current stock pedals to clip-ins.

Not that my fall had anything to do with my current pedals but the fact that the bike would probably stick to my feed during such fall keeps me from switching to clip ins.

I was looking at some Shimano's with a flat side (hope to use the right term here) and the clip in side so that i could use a normal shoe if i want to just go around the corner.

Any recommendation on solid clip-ins (doesn't have to be Shimano), which are easy to get out of if needed would be great.

Thank you.
 

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The only times I've hit the ground with my Time pedals still attached to my shoes were zero speed "Timbeerr!!!" maneouvers when I was still learning to ride with clipless.

In city traffic the equivalent is stopping at the red light while a bunch of college girls are watching....
 

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Wannebe said:
Hoping to post this question in the correct forum, can anyone please recommend good clip-in pedals?

Last week my head, shoulder and back said hello to the friendly streets of Los Angeles during a front tire blowoutGotta figure out how to ride through that and i am now somewhat hesitant (scared) again to switch current stock pedals to clip-ins.

Not that my fall had anything to do with my current pedals but the fact that the bike would probably stick to my feed during such fall keeps me from switching to clip ins.Nope that doesn't happen bikes generally return to sender shortly after and endo and hit you on the head

I was looking at some Shimano's with a flat side (hope to use the right term here) and the clip in side so that i could use a normal shoe if i want to just go around the corner.

Any recommendation on solid clip-ins (doesn't have to be Shimano), which are easy to get out of if needed would be great.

Thank you.
Shimano can't really go wrong...
 

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perttime said:
The only times I've hit the ground with my Time pedals still attached to my shoes were zero speed "Timbeerr!!!" maneouvers when I was still learning to ride with clipless.

In city traffic the equivalent is stopping at the red light while a bunch of college girls are watching....
That has been my experience as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
jeffscott said:
Nope that doesn't happen bikes generally return to sender shortly after and endo and hit you on the head
@jeffscott: i like that one :)

Any recommendation on specific models?
 

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shimano's are generally a good bet for most people. I don't know anyone who has not had a few failed get-outs (horizontal trackstand) as they learn to clip out. Now when I crash I always wonder 'how the hell did I manage to automatically clip out this time?'
 

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Another beautiful fact filled post from MTBR's own Vicar on Earth - JeffposerScott,

I just love this one :

Wannebe - Last week my head, shoulder and back said hello to the friendly streets of Los Angeles during a front tire blowout - reply from JeffposerScott - Gotta figure out how to ride through that

I cannot wait to see JeffposerScott's post on how he trains to ride through a front tire blow out. I can just imagine that JeffposerScott rides the streets of Calgary with a 22 pistol and shoots out his front tire at random times, like in the middle of busy intersections, passing a bus, ridding the kiddy bike trails on Sunday.

Got to love this guy.
 

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ZIT30/34 said:
Another beautiful fact filled post from MTBR's own Vicar on Earth - JeffposerScott,

I just love this one :

Wannebe - Last week my head, shoulder and back said hello to the friendly streets of Los Angeles during a front tire blowout - reply from JeffposerScott - Gotta figure out how to ride through that

I cannot wait to see JeffposerScott's post on how he trains to ride through a front tire blow out. I can just imagine that JeffposerScott rides the streets of Calgary with a 22 pistol and shoots out his front tire at random times, like in the middle of busy intersections, passing a bus, ridding the kiddy bike trails on Sunday.

Got to love this guy.
So how do you ride through a flat front tire????

Oh Oh I know you just go over the bars for the hell of it...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
mtnbiker72 said:
Shimano pedals (NOT the one side flat, one side clip-in models) with the SH-56 cleats to start out with. These will release easier at multiple angles. Keep the stock SH-51 cleats as once clipping in and out becomes second nature, you'll want to use them.
Can i ask you why you dont recomment the one side flat ones?
 

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Wannebe said:
Can i ask you why you dont recomment the one side flat ones?
Because you have to constantly look down to get the appropriate side for clipping in...this will actually INCREASE your likelihood of crashing since you will not be looking where your going. If you want some sort of platform, look at the M424, M545, or M647 models.
 

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On the track and road I ride sew ups. In the mountains I ride tubless.

On the track the flat will sound like a shot gun and if I am on the 33 degree banking I am going for a slider, if I am on the straight I have so far ridden every flat down below the blue line. A sew up can also roll off the rim, now I have not yet had that happen on the track but I have seen it and I dont want to train for it because you cannot ride that out.

On the road a sew up also goes off like a shot gun and you are down on the rim very quickly, a sew up will wobble side to side for a moment and then roll to one side and the front begins to slide with it. Some I have ridden to a stop, some I have slid down the road on my side, but I have never gone over the handle bars.

On a mountain bike the front wheel is loaded much less than a track or road bike and my flats to date have all been easy to ride out because the tire has not decompressed as rapidly as a high pressure sew up.

As for Wannebe's question - I would not recommend Speedplays, they were the first clipless pedal approved for the track so I rode them got use to them and still ride them on the road and track but they release only when you swing your heel outward which over time will almost become natural. The clipless pedals I use on the dirt are egg beaters that were listed as an approved pedal for cyclecross a few years ago. I would check the cyclecross websites for what those riders recommend or email Richard Sachs. Cyclecross racing also has you running and carrying your bike over and around barriers so these racers prefer a clipless that is easy out and a one hit lock in so when they jump back on the bike they dont have to keep trying to lock in, they want to just step down and they are locked and going.

ZIT/30/34
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Pacoima

mtnbiker72 said:
Because you have to constantly look down to get the appropriate side for clipping in...this will actually INCREASE your likelihood of crashing since you will not be looking where your going. If you want some sort of platform, look at the M424, M545, or M647 models.
That makes a lot of sense!

I checked on the 424, 545, 647 and it seems that they could be used for a short ride with normal shoes if necessary.

So, off of these three models, whats the big difference justifying higher prices? Are the more expensive once just a couple of grams lighter or are there any significant differences justifying paying a little more in the long run?
 

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Wannebe said:
That makes a lot of sense!

I checked on the 424, 545, 647 and it seems that they could be used for a short ride with normal shoes if necessary.

So, off of these three models, whats the big difference justifying higher prices? Are the more expensive once just a couple of grams lighter or are there any significant differences justifying paying a little more in the long run?
It's mostly materials (pedal body, spindles, bearings) and a little weight...though the M647 uses the open body pedal inside which clears mud significantly better (the Shimano design is a little prone to mud clogging) than on the M424 and M545.
 

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Fear does weird things to the imagination

Some people, plain and simple, are afraid of attaching their feet to the pedals. You hear words like trapped and limiting. You also hear thoughts about how it negatively effects your options for handling and how it will make your crashes much worse. People make these ideas sound so sensible and inevitable to people who need to believe such things.

As a consequence people opt for platform-style spds or one-sided spds. It is all hedging and rationalization and apprehension. Fair enough. Almost everyone who steps forward to ride has these thoughts before clipping in. However it doesn't mean that the scenarios hold much water in any greater statistical sense.

Our high school league starts hundreds of new riders and it is VERY unusual to see them not in spds after the second race. It is all between the ears, not bloody flesh on the ground. Having said that, between-the-ears should never be discounted, but the reality of the situation ought to have a fair influence.

People overthink this. Get the dam*ed pedals, put them on, set them loose, practice clipping in and out 100 times on each foot and go ride. Clipping-in on an incline is awkward. Get your power foot clipped in, start perpendicular to the fall line and get the pedals turning. DO NOT STRUGGLE to get the other foot clipped-in; you will stop and dab or fall over. Keep pressure on the pedal with ANY part of the foot not clipped-in to promote rotation and once you get momentum you will get your other foot in.

There is the rare occaision for the Novice to clip in immediately in tough situations. It is very impressive to all in observance. Never, I say, never act surprised; be cool. The babes will dig you and want to date you. You have been warned.

Then...there is the OBLIGATORY SPD FALL. Very low speed, flat ground, usually in front of a bunch of people at a stop light, trail head, or intersection. One clicks a foot out and leans the wrong way or tries to slide the foot out sideways. There is a moment of of realization and down you go. IT IS HILARIOUS. Everyone does it and it is very rarely harmful to anything but pride. I did it last year on the last day of my YMCA Camp in front of all the kids. I have been in spds for over 20 years. I told them I did it on purpose to demonstrate the Classic SPD Fall as a part of their program. Yeah, coach. Right!
 

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ZIT30/34 said:
I cannot wait to see JeffposerScott's post on how he trains to ride through a front tire blow out. I can just imagine that JeffposerScott rides the streets of Calgary with a 22 pistol and shoots out his front tire at random times, like in the middle of busy intersections, passing a bus, ridding the kiddy bike trails on Sunday.
This approach works much better if you have a trusted assistant do the shooting. I find that the element of surprise is often diminished when shooting out my own tires.
 
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