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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got an old Titus / Hammerhead 100X (a beefed up Racer-X). It's a sweet bike, but it's also 15 years old. With the exception of the wheelset, the parts are pretty dated, even though they were primo at the time.

I figure it's going to cost around 2k for a pretty decent build, but things like standard axles, headset, etc. will always keep it somewhat dated.

Better to buy new or keep the classic?

Thoughts?
 

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new or used 1-2 years,no older. The geometry changes in the last 2 years are a brave new world compared to 15 years old. Wheel spacing, head tube, size rear tire the frame can take, geometry, advances in suspension design and shocks....
 

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In terms of dollars spent, I’m sure that a new bike will be “better” for the same amount spent. Mostly because it’s harder to find (good) parts for that old of a bike at this point. Whether or not it’s worth it to you to do that, is not something I can answer for you. If it were my money, with no attachment to the old bike, I’d be looking for a deal on a new bike in a few months.

Also, as pointed out, new bikes are “better” in terms of suspension performance, drivetrain, geometry, etc. A warning though, the first few rides on a new bike will feel weird though.

Usually the best deals on new bikes come around the end of the season, or the start of the new year.

I got a 2018 Kona Process 153 Al (the base model aluminum framed bike, ie, the cheapest one in the lineup) in Jan 2019 for $1000 off of Msrp, which put it at your price point exactly. I also seem to remember the Yt jeffsey, canyon spectral, and a few others being marked down into about that price point.

Good luck :).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wow, glad I asked. I didn't realize even things like geometry had changed.

I saw Santa Cruz still had the Blur, which shares the same basic suspension as the Racer-X had, so I figured things were more or less the same.

Anyhow, thanks for the responses! I think I'll probably end up refurbishing it as is, and buying a new hardtail.
 

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Wow, glad I asked. I didn't realize even things like geometry had changed.

I saw Santa Cruz still had the Blur, which shares the same basic suspension as the Racer-X had, so I figured things were more or less the same.

Anyhow, thanks for the responses! I think I'll probably end up refurbishing it as is, and buying a new hardtail.
Geometry in particular has changed a lot in even the last 5-7 yrs.

Here is a quick recap:

Bikes now are on average quite a bit larger, for any given size. Both Wheelbase, and reach. My 2018 bike is a size large. It is 55mm longer in reach than the 2012 bike I had in XL. A longer bike is more stable at speed.

Bikes now have shorter stems. A 100mm stem used to be commonplace. Now that "length" has been transferred to the frame, and bikes are coming with 35-50mm stems.

Bikes have slacker head tube angles than they did. Bikes commonly had head tube angles between 73-69 degrees. Modern bikes are 64-68 degrees (on average. Most trail bikes are solidly in the 65-66 area). A slacker head tube angle gives you more stability when going down hill (at the cost of some maneuverability at low speeds going up hills, especially when you're not used to it).

Seat tube angles are steeper (farther forwards). 73 degrees was common a few years ago. Now many bikes have ~75-78 degree seat tubes. These help you keep your weight forward when climbing, making steeper climbs easier.

Handlebars are wider. My 2012 bike came with 680mm bars. My 2018 came with 800mm bars. Wider bars give you more leverage to control the steering.

Bottom brackets are lower. This means pedals are closer to the ground, so you have to watch for more pedal strikes. The positive though is that when taking turns at speed, you're much more stable, as the center of gravity is lower.

Then there are drivetrain changes (single front chainrings and huge rear cassettes), suspension changes (full suspension bikes pedal pretty well now, unlike some years past), and the dropper post revolution.

Anyway, I think you have a good plan. Hopefully you find something you're interested in :).
 

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Go test ride some bikes, not parking lot ride, but trail ride.

A 150-160mm bike today pedals up hill as well or better than a 100mm bike from 2004

A 150-160mm bike today does downhill and gnar better than a DH Bike in 2004

The 120-160mm bikes today are f'n amazing. Obviously you enjoy biking, don't go rushing into a purchase just to have something new. Chances are this next bike might last you as long as the last. Get something amazing, but DO TEST RIDE as many different bikes as you can. You might be surprised at what you end up with, and happier to boot. Which means you'll ride more, be in better shape & won't be a fat useless person 10-15 years down the road who sits on the couch & used to ride. We all don't want that.

That being said, old bikes rock for general exercise and nostalgia, but heck, they just don't compare to modern bikes if you want to push it. Not even close.
 
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