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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got an old Gary Fisher Zebrano that was badly abused at Burning Man then left outside to rust for some unknown number of winters. After cleaning/lube/adjust the components I found that it rides really nice, but the front ISYNC shocks are frozen in the up position. Adjusting the two rotating black plastic pieces at the tops of the shock posts made zero difference.

I tried going to OldRoads.com where I read (on fixya) that entering the s/n returned the production year, but the site is down right now. I don't know how to identify the year so I can search for the correct rebuild guide for the shocks, and see if parts are still available.

Does anyone have any suggestions about how I can identify the shocks so I can look for rebuild parts and instructions?

I've never done a shock tear-down before but I've done just about everything else on bicycles, and a good amount of auto mechanics,
so I'm fairly confident that I can muddle through this with instructions and parts.



Thanks In Advance,
Mike
 

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I was going to suggest contacting Trek, but you already did. But I'd actually call them. A couple years ago I called their support looking for specs for rear suspension bushings for a 2003 Fisher Sugar 3+. I assumed I'd need to make/machine new bushings. Turns out, not only did they have the specs, they actually still carry the parts! In less than 15 minutes on the phone, the parts were on the way. You may have different luck (or lack of) with a fork...

You could always call Gary himself. :)
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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Forks like that weren’t intended for any long term duties or serious mtb, there is most likely no damping mechanism (the reason for having a suspension fork) and the internals are likely corroded and jammed. You’d be much better off with a rigid fork. The reason they put this fork on the bike was to make it appear better, rather than spend that money on better parts, the appearance of functional suspension was a better seller of bikes. It’s not work the time or effort to try and save and would be likely downright dangerous even if it was “working”.
 

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since 4/10/2009
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the bike is a cheap hybrid as it is. even a new rigid fork is going to cost more than the bike is worth. let alone a replacement suspension fork of similar quality.

time to start hitting up bike coops and such for a used rigid fork that'll work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks to everyone who posted. I tried disassembling the fork but no luck, I think I'll go with a rigid fork as numerous people have suggested.
 
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