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In my mind, I can do it!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't seem to be very good at determining what I need to set in terms of the suspension feel of my bike. I'm just not sure how to set according to speed, feel, etc.. and how to diagnose things about the suspension that I don't like.

I think I know what these settings do:
Rebound - the speed at which the shock returns to it's extended length
Compression - the speed at which the suspension compresses
Floodgate - the force needed to open the floodgate and allow the suspension to compress
Positive air - for setting compression force
Negative air - for setting rebound force

So with all of this, how do I know what needs to be set and to what setting? Is there a guide or is it just hit and miss?

ALSO - Question, I have 2 shock pumps. Is it common that the readings might vary a bit between the two? Like one says 180psi where the other one might be 175psi but there is really no way to know for sure which is correct?
 

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In my mind, I can do it!
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Ok, I'll try to be more specific....

Lets say that I ride down the trail and hit a washboard section and the suspension feels rougher than it should. How do I know what that roughness is? Is it packing up or rebounding too quickly?

How about when I hit objects in the trail at slower speeds? How does speed affect rebound or compression?
 

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In my mind, I can do it!
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow... No one knows how to adjust shocks and forks? I am shocked... :madman:
 

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iviguy said:
Ok, I'll try to be more specific....

Lets say that I ride down the trail and hit a washboard section and the suspension feels rougher than it should. How do I know what that roughness is? Is it packing up or rebounding too quickly?

How about when I hit objects in the trail at slower speeds? How does speed affect rebound or compression?
Don't worry about the PSI settings on your shock pump. They're just guides. Adjust using sag.
If your fork feels harsh on fast washboard it could either be:
1. too much positive pressure
2. rebound is set too slow causing the fork to pack up (not rebounding fast enough so your fork is not at full length for the next bump).
3. not enough negative spring pressure (making it not as sensitive to smaller bumps).
4. any combination of all of the above.

If you're hitting stuff at slower speeds or taking big drops that are not in fast succession (like stutters), you'll want to slow down the rebound so the fork doesn't act like a pogo stick.

Having said that, I don't adjust my negative and positive pressures and rebound all that much once I get a good setup. However, I do adjust compression quite a bit (lockout- 1/2 compression- compression full off) to match my RP3 setting.
 

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I have the 426 coil with the stock spring and I'm 150lb. I get about 25mm of sag on level ground. Sorry I can't be much help with air pressures, but set the sag to 20-30%.

I leave the compression all the way off, same with the floodgate. I set the rebound 1/4 from full slow for the long, long climbs we have here in CO. For the decent I go about 1.5 turns from full slow.

Rebound is always a compromise, so it's best to experiment to find what you like and it also depends on your tire pressure and terrain etc. If you have access to a ski resort lift area, then that is an ideal place to figure out your suspension/tires.

In general slower rebound will absorb slower, bigger hits better and faster rebound will give you more grip on high-speed chatter.

BTW I made a nick the rebound knob on my Pike so I had a reference point.
 

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www.derbyrims.com
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iviguy said:
Wow... No one knows how to adjust shocks and forks? I am shocked... :madman:
To set up your suspension damping initially set all damping adjuster and platform valve adjusters to full soft (fastest)

First set Static sag. Static sag is the amount of sag with rider, held still on the bike by an assistant, at normal seated riding position (normally about 20 - 25% travel front and rear).

After setting up your static sag, set your damping by opening up compression and rebound to the softest setting. Then for a base line setting, first adjust your damping in (firmer) only enough to keep the shock and fork from extending repeatedly more than twice upon rebounding from a single big bump (this is usually about midway in the adjustment range of quality shocks and forks such as Fox.).

Then set your fork compression only firm enough to reduce overly rapid dive when suddenly braking hard. Shock compression damping should be left soft as possible unless the bike has excessive pedal-bob and no platform valve adjustment (adjust platform firmer to reduce pedal bob, more on platforms later), use rebound adjustment to control rear suspension handling wallow.

Soft damping is more bump compliant and comfortable. Firm up damping to suit your confidence level, setting rebound first with compression at full soft, then set compression in the fork only for brake dive, in the rear only set compression firmer than the softest setting if the bike bob's excessively while pedaling, inefficiently absorbing rider input.

Over firm rebound damping adjustment prevents the shock or fork from returning up to the static level of sag quick enough after repeated bumps, commonly called suspension "pack-down". The spring remains in a firmer tension range and the ride becomes harsh. Although very mild "pack-down" at higher speeds increases stability. Firmer compression damping doesn't allow the suspension to compress as much from bump hits. And over-firm compression compared to rebound can cause the fork (or shock) to "pack-up" and rise to ride higher while riding.

For racing or harder riding sessions where your pedaling causes inefficient excessive bobbing or too much wallowing and bucking in bumps, slow your compression damping a click or two (or more depending on adjustment range) only enough to stabilize the handling or pedaling, rebound shouldn't change more than a click (very little) to avoid pack-down and over firm bump handling.

For jump sessions, firm up compression much more and firm up rebound a little more too.

If your shock has adjustable platform, adjust it last to be any firmer from the most open (non-locked-out) adjustment. Platform valving is an automatic-lockout, not damping. Any platform damping will reduce small bump compliance but reduce inefficient pedal bob and delay brake dive. Adjust only more firm platform lockout threshold as needed for pedaling acceleration efficiency after the shock damping is set for handling and braking quality and confidence.

:thumbsup:

- ray
 

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Meh.
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Rebound should be set as fast as possible without bouncing or jarring you up.

Get about 30% of sag, run light compression, set Floodgate enough that it tunes out pedal and braking forces, but will open up for the bumps.

For more freeride oriented stuff (what I do). I run 3/4 Floodgate, 1/2 to 3/4 compression. I have the coil version, so don't know that tell you about air pressure.
 

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hope this helps

iviguy,

the 575 takes a bit of trial and error before it feels like your bike. I've had mine for a couple of months, and i'm just now having my 575 ephiphany. It's ideal shock settings for your weight are a very narrow range and it can be a little frustrating to find, but once you do, it feels like magic.

anyway, i found this article published in MBA very helpful. Use it in combination with the Yeti and FOX set up guides and your own judgement and it should get you there quicker.

good luck -
 

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attachment wont take

iviguy,

sorry man, i've tried twice to get the article attachment to post and it wont. Don't know why. What's your email address and I will email it to you.
 

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In my mind, I can do it!
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2,365 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
goatboy001 said:
iviguy,

sorry man, i've tried twice to get the article attachment to post and it wont. Don't know why. What's your email address and I will email it to you.
Check your PM.
 

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In my mind, I can do it!
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2,365 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
derby said:
To set up your suspension damping initially set all damping adjuster and platform valve adjusters to full soft (fastest)

First set Static sag. Static sag is the amount of sag with rider, held still on the bike by an assistant, at normal seated riding position (normally about 20 - 25% travel front and rear).

After setting up your static sag, set your damping by opening up compression and rebound to the softest setting. Then for a base line setting, first adjust your damping in (firmer) only enough to keep the shock and fork from extending repeatedly more than twice upon rebounding from a single big bump (this is usually about midway in the adjustment range of quality shocks and forks such as Fox.).

Then set your fork compression only firm enough to reduce overly rapid dive when suddenly braking hard. Shock compression damping should be left soft as possible unless the bike has excessive pedal-bob and no platform valve adjustment (adjust platform firmer to reduce pedal bob, more on platforms later), use rebound adjustment to control rear suspension handling wallow.

Soft damping is more bump compliant and comfortable. Firm up damping to suit your confidence level, setting rebound first with compression at full soft, then set compression in the fork only for brake dive, in the rear only set compression firmer than the softest setting if the bike bob's excessively while pedaling, inefficiently absorbing rider input.

Over firm rebound damping adjustment prevents the shock or fork from returning up to the static level of sag quick enough after repeated bumps, commonly called suspension "pack-down". The spring remains in a firmer tension range and the ride becomes harsh. Although very mild "pack-down" at higher speeds increases stability. Firmer compression damping doesn't allow the suspension to compress as much from bump hits. And over-firm compression compared to rebound can cause the fork (or shock) to "pack-up" and rise to ride higher while riding.

For racing or harder riding sessions where your pedaling causes inefficient excessive bobbing or too much wallowing and bucking in bumps, slow your compression damping a click or two (or more depending on adjustment range) only enough to stabilize the handling or pedaling, rebound shouldn't change more than a click (very little) to avoid pack-down and over firm bump handling.

For jump sessions, firm up compression much more and firm up rebound a little more too.

If your shock has adjustable platform, adjust it last to be any firmer from the most open (non-locked-out) adjustment. Platform valving is an automatic-lockout, not damping. Any platform damping will reduce small bump compliance but reduce inefficient pedal bob and delay brake dive. Adjust only more firm platform lockout threshold as needed for pedaling acceleration efficiency after the shock damping is set for handling and braking quality and confidence.

:thumbsup:

- ray
Thanks, I'll give this method a try.
 
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