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In all the servicing I've done on the older model Rebas I have never changed the O-rings out :skep: I think that once you do regular oil changes and don't let it loose viscosity they should be fine, just give them a good wipe off and cleaning and the make sure and coat them good with some cleannew oil.
 

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Yep... Although the manufacturer say to change the seals any time you take the fork apart you can "get away with it" and not change the seals but there are some things to pay attention to. Check the foam wiper seal under the gray dust wiper, usually this needs to be cleaned otherwise you will be taking the fork apart again in a short time to replace the dust wiper and foam o-ring. Best way I have found to clean these is with a can of WD-40 and a drain pan. Hold the O-ring over the drain pan, Spray WD-40 liberally all over the foam O-ring then squeeze the O-ring as if to wring it out you may have to repeat this a few times to get all the debris from the filter. It should be a lighter yellowish color when clean. Then soak the O-ring in 15wt oil, we also spray our Foam wipers with PJ1 airfilter oil it helps trap the oil in the foam and keeps it super slick. The sticky feeling a lot of forks have is from the foam O-rings not being properly lubricated. The rest can be found on SRAM's site. I just think this step is very important. I used to rebuild shocks at races and we would reuse the seals but always do this step and it does make a difference, we would see guys on other trucks do just oil changes and the forks blew up before the races ended. You are trying to get another season or so out of it so Do NOT skip this step.
 

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Just to add to the conversation, 1200 miles is a LONG way to go with no service. I would HIGHLY recomend getting comfortable with the 20 minutes it takes to clean and swap the bushing lube. This will give you a good idea of how quick and simple this work is: http://video.mpora.com/fmp.swf?ex=1...p://forums.farkin.net/showthread.php?t=124363 IMO it is not worth putting this off for so long when the trade off could be VERY expensive.

20 hours of riding is a recomended interval for this service. This may be a bit much depending on what kind of use your fork sees, but it will give you some perspective.
 

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What davep said. You need to maintain your fork to keep it working and working well. It's a high performance piece of equipment, and regular service is part of the cost.

After having talked with some people and having done some reading, I'd suggest just throwing away the foam rings and run just the wiper and oil seal. Grease in the wiper will be enough to lubricate it, and you really don't need an oil soaked foam ring absorbing dirt and keeping it pressed again the stanchions.
 

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The service manual I have says to change the Motion Control oil every 100 hours, clean, inspect, service the air spring, dust wipers and seals every 50 hours. I usually pull mine apart and change the oil in the lowers, clean the dust/oil seals or replace them (depending on the fork you have) and replace the foam rings about every 4 months (3 times a year). Once I pull the fork apart I always hate to put it back together with the old dust wipers and foam rings so I usually change them, this is probably overkill but it is so easy. If I still used my Reba I would buy a 20 pack of the foam rings for $20.00 and just change them out each time I serviced the fork. Actually if I could but all the parts in bulk cheaply I would service the fork more regularly ($20.00 for 2 pieces of foam and a couple of rubber rings is criminal). The air spring is easy to service and I haven't changed the O rings on mine. I just clean the air spring assembly, poor the 15w in its large bottle cap and roll the two seals in the oil before reinstalling.
If you change the oil seals in the lowers you need the tool to install the new seals or make the tool with some plumbing parts or PVC of a similar diameter. The cap on the Pit Stop 15w oil I have is the right diameter and I used that, but you risk breaking the cap or installing improperly if you are not patient and diligent.
Good luck and service that thing!
R
 

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RJG said:
Service manuals certainly help with the what and how, but it is pretty standard (in any industry that I can think of) to down play the service intervals on any item to make it seem like it is 'superior', is easier and less expensive to keep up.

Did you watch the video I posted? Catch the 20 hour service recomendation by THE premier UK suspension tuner and Push partner? When you have to buy new seals/useless foam rings/bushings/stanchions because they wear out, do you think about the fact that the $$ goes to the same people that recomend such lack service intervals.It might seem like a lot, but once you do this a time or two, it really only takes 15 min to drain the oil, clean and slick honey the seals, re-fill with oil.

Since it is as statistically significant as your experiences: I own two 2007 RS forks. A lyric and a Boxxer, both coil. They were both installed new late spring 07 and have been ridden year-round since then in all the lovely weather that the PNW/Whistler can provide.
Both forks are on original seals, wipers, crush washers, bushings, etc. Neither fork shows any bushing wear, stanchion wear, or exibit any deteriorating seal issues. Neither have leaked a drop of oil. Both forks are essentially 'as new' internally. I have had the same results with several Marz forks and four manitous. (if you dig around here a bit, and add your findings to your own experience, you will notice that most people dont have this kind of 'luck' with forks.......nor do they do regular service on their forks).

The common denominator in my forks is that both saw complete tear down, lube and rebuild before ever being ridden....and they both see bushing lube and seal greasing at ~20 hour intervals....

ALL new forks use very little bushing lube (because of consumer pressure to lower weight). There is hardly enough oil to form a lubricating film on the entire sliding surfaces. Grease, oxidization, contamination, and evaporation all serve to lower the amount and effictiveness of the minimal starting oil volume (as well as MANY forks being delivered short on lube). How often do you think you car would require oil changes if it only held a cup of oil and had no filter?
 

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Again, like davep said. I ride in the mid Atlantic, so our riding conditions are much cleaner, but even then, and with running Enduro seals, my Foxes get torn down and serviced about every 30 riding hours. It only takes me 15 minutes to do a fork, and costs me about $2, but you even my old fork, which had been ridden 5 years when I sold it, looking completely new inside, and this is a stanchion eating Fox we're talking about!
 

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So you wanna service your fork eh?

Being a cartridge fork you can leave your damper alone (this will simplify the service your first time round in the reba). What a lot of people are recommending here is overkill for basic servicing. Lets keep it simple less chance of making mistakes.

Remove the lowers, clean your stanchions and lowers with some isopropanol.

Remove your foam rings (below the dust wipers) and soak them in a small bowl of oil, if they are discoloured, squeeze them out a couple times to get most of the grunge out and then soak them in some fresh oil and put them back into the lowers.

Lubricate your dust wipers and put the fork back together.

Invert your fork and put in some fresh lubricating oil, I use 5w40 synthetic oil (personal preference from anecdotal experience and the fact that the oil is purple, which is cool) you can also use 15w damper oil.

Be careful when sliding your fork back together, do it SLOWLY it will probably be a good idea to put a cloth over the bolt holes in the lowers otherwise you might risk a mini oil geyser. Bolt the lowers back to the stanchions and clean up your fork. Crush washers don't typically need to be replaced with every service but still be aware of potential leaks.

Put that fork back on your bike and cycle it through. There, that feels better doesn't it?

Reference the SRAM tech manuals
http://www.sram.com/en/service/rockshox/tech_manuals.php

The EnduroSeals site has a really thorough service of a Rockshox Pike, you'll find that this process is pretty much identical to the Reba servicing.
http://www.enduroforkseals.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderfiles/pike_dual_air3.pdf

Good luck!

Deep.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
"Invert your fork and put in some fresh lubricating oil, I use 5w40 synthetic oil (personal preference from anecdotal experience and the fact that the oil is purple, which is cool) you can also use 15w damper oil."
Peedama
Are you saying I can use Synthetic motor oil instead of shock oil?
 

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I don't know if I've done anywhere near as many k's as you but I've had my Tora 318 since '06 and have pulled it apart several times and given it an oil service. I don't see why you should have to replace o-rings if none are damaged and everything is working properly, but you might want to consider it since you're pulling the fork apart it's possibly easier just to do it and then not have to worry about it.

From my experience if you ride in dusty conditions the moco oil seems to get dirty pretty quick, I would change that more regularly, and it can be done without pulling the whole fork apart which is great.

All these times though I was never game to pry the dust wiper seals off until recently, I did that and gave them a good clean and grease, now the fork feels much better and smoother!

You can get fork oil cheap enough from a Motorbike store, I don't see the need to go for car oil.
 

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davep said:
Service manuals certainly help with the what and how, but it is pretty standard (in any industry that I can think of) to down play the service intervals on any item to make it seem like it is 'superior', is easier and less expensive to keep up.
I think that my message was lost in translation. I am in agreement with you that the RS forks are so easy to service that once you do it, it becomes regular maintenance just like airing up or cleaning the drivetrain. I simply was stating what the service manual says whether right or wrong, I don't know. For me I don't feel like I need to service my forks every 4th ride but maybe others do and that is fine.
Also, if I lived in the PNW I could understand more frequent service. I lived in Oregon for 5 years and the climate is far different than her in Santa Cruz. You have to consider conditions. I don't keep data on my ride times and hours so I service every season here.
If I didn't service my equipment myself it might be cheaper to buy a new fork every year.
 

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Newb question: I watched the SRAM video for servicing Rebas, I'm guessing it's the same with Revelations. Is there a way to pull the lowers off without having all the oil leak out? For instance if I want to check the oil level in the damper without replacing it. If not, can I just collect it and pour it back in?

Also If I were to go to my local motorcycle shop, what kind of oil would fit the 2010 Revelation? All I know is that there is a lot of variation among the brands for a given fork oil (5wt/10wt). Is there a particular brand I should be looking for? I'd prefer if it wasn't some RockShox OEM brand that I have to pay through the nose for.
 

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Removing the topcap on the right side of your fork will give you access to the damper oil, however it's a bit of a pain to get it all out which will make it harder to put in the recommended level by rockshox as they do their oil measurements by volume not by height. If you're not feeling any deadspace with your lockout/compression fully closed your volumes should be ok. Being a cartridge fork the oil should be remaining in good condition, any time I've opened up and overhauled the damper oil in my tora 318 it's been pristine.

Edit: take caution and time in removing the right side topcap as it's attached to the motion control unit, twist and gently rock it out of the uppers, take your time or you might just pull the upper half of the motion control compression unit. If this happens you can either take the fork apart and push the motion control unit out from underneath or try to fish it out of the top with a bent spoke. My advice is take your time because this is a major PITA (I speak from personal experience).
 

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derailin_palin said:
Also If I were to go to my local motorcycle shop, what kind of oil would fit the 2010 Revelation? All I know is that there is a lot of variation among the brands for a given fork oil (5wt/10wt). Is there a particular brand I should be looking for? I'd prefer if it wasn't some RockShox OEM brand that I have to pay through the nose for.
Current generation Rock Shox dampers use 5wt oil buuuuut choose an oil by [email protected], not by weight.



I use motorex 2.5w because it's readily available to me and pretty similar in physical characteristics to the stock rockshox oil. A lot of people seem to praise maxima and redline oil on this forum too.
 

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derailin_palin said:
Thanks for the chart! What if [email protected] for two oils is very similar but viscocity index differs significantly, like by a factor of 2. Would the two oils then perform very differently?
As far as I understand, VI is the amount that the viscosity of a lubricant will change over a range of temperature. higher values indicate that the viscosity of the oil will not change that much between higher and lower temperatures. Since a forks operating temperature is much narrower than that of lets say a gasoline engine, the value of the VI is much less relevant.
 

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OK, i'm confused now. I used Shell Advance fork 5 in my Reba MC damper but according to the above table, it is double the viscosity (33.05 [email protected]) than Rockshox 5wt (16.10).

Does that mean I effectivly have 10wt (according to RS) in my damper? the Shell oil is clear and pretty thin, and similar to the original oil that I replaced.

Help?

C
 
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