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guy who bikes
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Hey, in advance thanks for any advice. I just bought a set of Chris King hubs to lace to DT Swiss XR 4.2D rims. I have no experience building wheels and limited experience truing wheels. I demand perfection in this bike, and so I'm trying to figure out if this is an obtainable goal for my first build. I work in a bike shop and so have access to the tools and could get a little help from our head mechanic, but obviously it's our busy season, so he doesn't have much time to be helping. Should I just have him build them for a little extra money and get a professionally built wheelset or risk trying my hand :madman:? Again thanks for any advice.
 

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If you go slow, follow the steps carefully and avoid interruptions, you should be OK. Having worked at a shop I woudn't suggest doing it doing business hours- best case scenario, do it after hours and buy your buddy a 6-pack to hang out, work on his own bike and be there to answer any questions.

One thing that confused the hell out of me when I was learning, was that everybody I asked had a different method for building. Some guys do 8 spokes on each side, then twist the wheel, then put the other 16 spokes in. Others do 8 on one side, then twist, then do the other 8 on the same side, then do the opposite side. So on and so forth. If you are getting advice from multiple people it helps to know their process first.

The thing I screw up the most, but has the least consequence, is getting the valve stem centered between open spokes. No big deal but costs style points. So if you do one side first (as I do) check carefully when starting the opposite side.

Avoid alloy nipples on your first build. or always. ;)

Lastly, don't rush to truing or dishing. Lace until their's 1 thread exposed on each nipple, then do 1/2 turns on each nipple, starting with the valve stem, until the wheel tensions up. Don't worry about truing/dishing/tensioning until the wheel has at least some tension.
 

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Personally I'd recommend...

giving a wheel set wtih that expensive of components to a pro. Kings are VERY nice hubs and quite expensive as you know, and 4.2 hoops aren't cheap either. If you expect perfection from this bike, then the wheel build had better be perfect as well correct? I would suggest cutting your teeth on some cheaper builds or rebuilds first. Get a feel for it with a wheel set that won't really matter if it's not quite perfect. The bottom line is, I can almost guarentee you that your first build will not be perfect no matter how good your components are, or how many books you read, or if you have the advice of a pro. You don't have the experience and knowledge to make it so. So give it to your head mech and let him do it. If he's good, your wheels will be as close to perfect as anything man made can get. Take the time to watch him build them, ask questions, but don't be a pest. And, BRING BEER!!! Nothing goes better with a wheel build project than a couple of cold Fat Tires! :thumbsup: Just my 2 cents.

Good Dirt
 

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When lacing I cheat so I don't mess up or twist the wrong way. I always build with outbound spokes as pushing spokes. Once I get the first set (first 8 of 32) laced I then add one inbound spoke from the same flange. If my first set was inbound, then my one 'cheater spoke ' will be an outbound(over, over, under). This puts the twist or cross to the spokes and keeps things in check.
Also, my first set laced (inbound) goes directly to the valve hole. Then that cheater spoke will go in the second hole on the other side of the valve.
Lube each spoke in the rim with a dab of tri-flow. This will help reduce friction between the nipple and rim(or eyelet) during the truing process.
Definitely use some sort of spoke prep on the threads.
Don't get discouraged is you mess-up, every wheel builder has. If someone tells you otherwise, they're lying.
Good Luck.
 

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Double-metric mtb man
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Roger's book is awesome.

For my first build I followed Roger's book. Hope Pro II's and Mavic 819's here (yeah, tubeless to start...). Best advice is take it slow for your first ones and do not rush anything. Also, if there is a bike commuter's co-op or garage around, having someone experienced to give some pointers while you're doing it is invaluable (thanks 65'er).

You can do well your first time out...but you just need to be well read first and take your time (I used a dial gauge on my build and called it done at 0.002" off true after the initial ride in...they were 0.001" out to begin with but moved a bit during the first couple rides...I was a little gentle in my initial stress relieving ;) ).
 
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