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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a cross post from the Maverick Forum.

So I finally got my flow's set up tubeless tonight. While mounting my rear wheel and cycling through the cranks...I noticed the wheel is significantly shifted towards one side of the rear triangle (the brake side), causing the tire to rub slightly against the frame. I am assuming the rear triangle got out of whack somehow...is there anything I can do about this?

Here is a crappy pic..notice the offset to the left.
Hardwood Tread Synthetic rubber Wood stain Symmetry
 

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How old is the wheel? Who built it?

My guess would be that your rim is not properly centered between the hub ends....AKA the wheel is not properly dished. Check the wheel dish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That could be. There is 3/4" on the one side.

The Spoke (Williamstown, MA) built it this spring...new hope hub w/ new Stans Flow rim. Paul knows his shat though

I haven't had any issues all spring/summer, there is the start of some paint rub on the frame...which leads me to believe that it is relatively new.

Just eyeballin, which obviously isn't very accurate, the frame doesn't look out of true...is there a way to measure it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Correction...the Spoke did not build it (they built the front). A bike shop in Bennington, VT built it...and Paul of the Spoke was not impressed with his performance.

The tire doesn't rub the whole way, just a few inches where its slightly out of true...maybe thats all it took the make the incorrect dishing evident.

If so...what would be my next step.
 

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Have it dished for your frame.

Many companies run different offset rears, so different frames require having your rear wheel dished differently.
 

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Before you redish the wheel, inspect your drop-outs and axle and make sure everything is OK there. Flip the wheel and see if its pushed over the other way.

A slight amount of dirt between drop-out and axle can skew the rear wheel greatly. Alternatively, your dropouts may be flogged out. If you run the rear wheel not tight enough then it can easily hammer out the dropouts slightly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the input guys. I reassembled my old wheel and dropped er in...the spacing is much better. I will get the other wheel redished.

Lesson learned in being more picky on who builds my wheels..I'll just have to learn
 

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two options - buy or build, your own dishing tool. You might be better off taking it to a shop and having it done - it shouldn't cost much.
 
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