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slap happy
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello everyone. first thread here, so bear with me!

my question is, what dictates travel (for rear suspension)? i've bought a jamis parker 1, and was under the assumption that it had 100mm of rear travel, as advertised on jenson's website.
well, in reality there is nowhere near 100mm of rear travel, more like 50mm. so i guess i have two questions.

#1, where do they get 100mm of travel from? the fox float r on it doesn't even have that much travel.

#2, what dictates how much travel your frame is capable of? can i get a better rear shock that has more available travel, or is the frame of the bicycle only made for a certain amount of movement?

i'm not a new rider, i've been riding hardtails for many years now, but this is my first "real" mtn bike, as in full suspension and hydro disc brakes. the parker is nowhere near top o the line but for the price it has enough features to suite me.
thanks in advance for any insight into this, and if someone has a link to a faq or some such, that maybe has a lot of the basics (best way to setup suspension, bleeding these brakes, care tips etc).
 

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slap happy
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
gradeafailure, thanks that's what i was looking for.

ratmonkey, care to expand on that?
 

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slap happy
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
another great reply. thanks!

is there a mtn bike mechanics for dummies or mtn bike basics 101 or something of the like?
 

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slap happy
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
so by that definition, this float r doesn't have 100mm travel, only 50mm if travel is defined by "how much the suspension compresses as it works".
 

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slap happy
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417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
gotcha. i'm not being intentionally dense, i'm just new to all of this.
 

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slap happy
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
and i took "how much the suspension compresses" to mean the "in" stroke, not both in and out stroke.
 

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slap happy
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
so that means what i have (float r) as advertised as 100mm travel, really only is 50mm....if "travel" is defined as how much the shock compresses.

unless this is like the ford/chevy debate.....some people define travel as full compression/retraction distance and some day it's measured as just compression.

i think i'm going to leave this one alone lol. i'm sure i'll be happy with it either way. if not, a better rear shock (even if it's just more adjustability, and a lock-out option) isn't too much $ at all.
 

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~Disc~Golf~
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16,496 Posts
mullen119 said:
...You can't change the rear travel of a bike in 95% of situations.
if you have different shock mount positions you can :thumbsup:
6" (currently), 5" and 4" -(2"shock stroke)

I think this may be what ratmonkey was referring to with "mechanical advantage"?
3:1 -> 2.5:1 -> 2:1
 

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Generally, when we discuss travel, we refer to the bike's full suspension compression amount, not how much "travel" (generally refered to as shock stroke) the shock has. Bike travel will always be greater than the shock stroke, otherwise shocks would just be too big (and heavy) to fit in frames so bikes suspension are designed with leverage bulit in so the rear axle moves at greater rate than the shock compresses (generally between 2x and 3x). A bikes leverage ratio is the suspension travel divided by shock stroke, for example a 6" travel bike with a 2" stroke shock has a 3:1 leverage ratio. 2 different bikes with the same travel can have different size shocks because they have different leverage ratios, and 2 different bikes with the same size shock can have different travel amounts.
Nowhere in the bike industry is travel defined by compression + extension, for example a bike with 6" of compression (and therefore 6" of extension) is called a 6" bike, NEVER a 12" bike. Hope this clears it all up.
 

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istandalone said:
so that means what i have (float r) as advertised as 100mm travel, really only is 50mm....if "travel" is defined as how much the shock compresses.

unless this is like the ford/chevy debate.....some people define travel as full compression/retraction distance and some day it's measured as just compression.

i think i'm going to leave this one alone lol. i'm sure i'll be happy with it either way. if not, a better rear shock (even if it's just more adjustability, and a lock-out option) isn't too much $ at all.
Forget the shock. You are concentrating on the wrong part if the suspension system.

Travel is measured at the point of contact with the ground and from full slack to full bump.
the only place that a measurement matters is at the rear axle. your shock could be 1" long or 8"long and you can make it have that 4" of travel in the axle with the correct link ratio.
 

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slap happy
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
thanks, things like that is exactly what i need to know. but you could have said that to begin with, instead of that cryptic "mechanical advantage" comment.
it's obvious i'm a newb with this stuff.
 
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