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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought my 2012 Trek HiFi Deluxe about this time last year. I read a good bit about bike tech before buying, so was familiar with maintenance issues on some items, such as the Fox RP2 shock. Being the overprotective new dad for my new baby, I decided to try and protect against dust on the shock. I ride on some pretty dusty trails. Anyway, I sheathed the fully extended cylinder of the shock with a segment of old 1.5" dia. inner tube. I squirted a liberal amount of graphite into the inner tube segment before cinching it into place with a cable tie on each end.

Seems to have worked like a charm so far. Instead of getting bathed in a fine dust of ground rock during each ride, the cylinder is bathed in a fine dust of graphite instead. Can't say for sure if it's helping, and I'm still going to order some new seals for this coming season, but I wanted to share the idea, in case anyone is interested. It's very cheap/easy.

Attached are some pix for anyone who may be interested.

Badad online

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Joined: Sun Mar 30, 2014 6:03 pm
 

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All that thing will do is trap dirt and water inside and destroy your shock. Take it off, and just do the recommended service intervals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have ridden the bike for several hundred miles over very rough trails since putting the sheath over the shock. No evidence of either dust building up, water damage, or other damage of any sort after recently removing it for inspection. Water could be a problem elsewhere, but not here in the desert. Entering third year on this shock with no seal replacement; though I am planning on doing so in a month or two.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I figured that the shaft of the shock would be exposed to constant rock dust on the surface as it moved in relation to the seal, and that, basically "replacing the rock dust with graphite dust" couldn't hurt, so I gave it a try. I haven't done a "scientific study", but it seems to have worked in my case, and it cost perhaps $0.25 to do it. I originally was concerned that the graphite might interfere with the seal integrity, but no pressure loss apparent over the winter since at last check (approx 6 months ago), tho I haven't hooked up the gauge yet.
 
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