Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Probably a total noob question, but why are there different rear shock setups? I presume some of it has to do with patent issues, but that aside are their advantages to some over others for certain riding styles/conditions? Even within a manufacturer there are changes as one goes from the "higher end" bikes to the "lower end". Sorry if this is a lame question, if it should be posted in the suspension forum, or if I should not even worry about it. I'm still in the research phase of my purchase (as if that wasn't obvious) so thought I would ask. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,163 Posts
Many reasons- cost, geometry, patent issues, weight, and on and on

Mountain biking on full suspension bikes is a relatively new pastime, and rear suspension is a fairly complicated engineering problem. Think about trying to make a bike that rides up, down, and flat well, weighs as little as possible, isn't too costly to produce, and perfectly supports a rider while balancing the forces of both pedal input and braking. Then add in that every company that has produced a workable design before you has patented it, and almost none of those patents have expired (c'mon 2012!). Then throw in the fact that shocks keep evolving, so that something that didn't work well years ago can compete again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
9.8; very true. Obviously there are a lot of considerations and constant development occurring, but perhaps a more specific (I think) question from me would be appropriate.

There appear, to me at least, to be two rear shock orientations that dominate the landscape. One is "anchored" near the bottom bracket with a vertical orientation surrounding the seat tube, and the other is "anchored" at the top of the rear triangle with a horizontal orientation that connects to either the the top or down tube.

I realize that I'm probably over simplifying the configurations, but has the rear shock setup influence purchasing for any of the more knowledgable riders and if so why? Or should I even care?
 

·
T.W.O.
Joined
·
8,168 Posts
BillV said:
9.8; very true. Obviously there are a lot of considerations and constant development occurring, but perhaps a more specific (I think) question from me would be appropriate.

There appear, to me at least, to be two rear shock orientations that dominate the landscape. One is "anchored" near the bottom bracket with a vertical orientation surrounding the seat tube, and the other is "anchored" at the top of the rear triangle with a horizontal orientation that connects to either the the top or down tube.

I realize that I'm probably over simplifying the configurations, but has the rear shock setup influence purchasing for any of the more knowledgable riders and if so why? Or should I even care?
If you are in the market of a new full suspension bike, what would be best is to start narrow down your search.

Budget
Riding style, and experience
Trails you ride, or want to ride
Height, weight, age, level of fitness
are you racing?

Your current bike. likes and dislikes.

Pretty much 2 popular choices for recreational riders are XC or cross country, and AM All mountain/ Trail riding.

the amount of rear wheel travel us a separating factor.

As far as the shock configuration is somewhat not as important as what fit you better. The same company can offer 2 or more different shock configuration.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top