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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted this in the beginners corner but suspect my curiousity was misinterpreted as being a major factor in my pending bike purchase, which it is not. I was wondering if anyone could explain some of the pros and cons of the two main, as I see it, rear shock configurations. By two main configurations I mean either "anchored" near the bottom bracket or anchored at the top of the rear triangle. It even seems like some manufacturers use different configurations on different levels of bikes, so there must be some reason for changing from one to the other. Sorry if this has been addressed previously.
 

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Yup....

and the reason in most cases is usually frame or linkage clearance or access to lockout levers, damping adjustment knobs, air valves, etc. It don't make one bit of difference which way the shock is mounted otherwise.

Good Dirt
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
bad mechanic said:
The shock position, by itself, doesn't matter.
Guess I was thinking more about differences in the the whole rear suspension setups, not just the shock orientation. Sorry to not be more clear. Maybe doesn't matter though.
 

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BillV said:
I posted this in the beginners corner but suspect my curiousity was misinterpreted as being a major factor in my pending bike purchase, which it is not. I was wondering if anyone could explain some of the pros and cons of the two main, as I see it, rear shock configurations. By two main configurations I mean either "anchored" near the bottom bracket or anchored at the top of the rear triangle. It even seems like some manufacturers use different configurations on different levels of bikes, so there must be some reason for changing from one to the other. Sorry if this has been addressed previously.
The configuration of the shock (vertical, horizontal, what it is anchored to, etc) means nothing by itself. The shock is set up in conjunction with the rest of the rear suspension, and most suspension designs can end up with either configuration for the shock. In other words, there is no advantage to either configuration as a rule.
 
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