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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I think I'll be getting one, but I'm waiting for the carbon version. I doubt there will be 3 different version of the carbon bar, but I could be wrong.

Anyway, I noticed that CRC has 3 versions of the Carnegie's; + rise, - rise, and flat. Anybody care to discuss which version would be the most comfortable and why?

Brant?

Link for the lazy (like me): https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Brands.aspx?BrandID=971

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
KeylessChuck said:
I have the flat version, and it is very comfortable. I am 100% satisfied with it. As to which version is the most comfortable totally depends on the individual and their bike setup.
Did you buy the flat over the other 2 for a reason? I'm just wondering how I can figure out if it would be better to have my hands flat (like you), or have the outside of my hands turned slightly up or down...

Anyway, glad to hear you like em!
 

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I just picked up a set from a member here (waiting for them to arrive).... Shutterbug67 is the guy...

I believe mine are the 1" rise.... I look forward to trying them out and giving you my opinion soon....

 

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Wish I Were Riding said:
Do you use it with the ends pointing up (as intended), or down? Is the aluminum one harsh?
Goes out to garage and looks at bike...... They are run conventional, not flipped or "droopy." I think that is what you meant. I adjusted the tilt of the bar till it felt comfortable. The Ergons I am running feel great with this bar.

I run this bar on a full-quish bike. As such, I've never been able to discern the harshness of one handlebar over the other. I've never run this bar on my rigid SS. Waiting for the carbon version for that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
chuckc1971 said:
Goes out to garage and looks at bike...... They are run conventional, not flipped or "droopy." I think that is what you meant. I adjusted the tilt of the bar till it felt comfortable. The Ergons I am running feel great with this bar.

I run this bar on a full-quish bike. As such, I've never been able to discern the harshness of one handlebar over the other. I've never run this bar on my rigid SS. Waiting for the carbon version for that.
Good to know, thanks for checking the garage for me. I will be riding 100% rigid, that's why I'm waiting for carbon too. If I like it enough, I might get an aluminum one for my other bike (the one I don't like to ride as much).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
HOLLYWOOD33 said:
I just picked up a set from a member here (waiting for them to arrive).... Shutterbug67 is the guy...

I believe mine are the 1" rise.... I look forward to trying them out and giving you my opinion soon....
Cool, please do come back and give details and feedback. And try it both flipped up and down, if you don't mind being the geunie pig! ;)
 

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Harmonius Wrench
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In my humble opinion, I don't think that the "rise" (negative or positive) will have much effect on comfort beyond how high off the ground the bars end up being with a particular stem.

The difference between the aluminum and carbon materials is big though. The carbon has a definite "give" while the alloy Carnegie's has none. To my mind, this will affect your comfort to a far greater degree than whether you run them flipped, or whether you have rise, or flat. (Assuming their would be that choice in carbon Carnegie's at some point).

I agree with the earlier poster that these are definitely the best "alt bars" ( that are not drop bars) out there now for aggressive trail riding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Guitar Ted said:
I agree with the earlier poster that these are definitely the best "alt bars" ( that are not drop bars) out there now for aggressive trail riding.
Thanks for commenting GT. If money were no object, I would already own a Gryphon with Woodchippers. As it is, I think the carbon Carnegie will be all the money I can spend for a while. I just wish I knew WHEN!
 

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The Carnegie maybe the best of the alt bars IMHO with its slightly more modest 25 deg backsweep. I have been on a handlebar frenzy and just removed the Mary bar from my rig.
I am going back to a more conventional riser bar with 10 degrees backsweep. The reason is quite simple. Having experimented with many different bars, it is now clear to me why top riders ride a low backsweep bar and and not a bar with bigger backsweep. Keep in mind, top riders endure the harshest conditions on their wrists and hands and racers are the most vigilant of all about protecting against injury.. The reason I am going back to a more conventional mtb bar is because a pronounced backsweep causes the bar to run very close to the ulnar nerve with a natural wrist position. With less backsweep as with a conventional mtb bar, the bar handle runs more along the base of the fingers which is less stressful to the hand reducing pressure on the Guyon canal which if loaded for prolonged intervals can cause handlebar palsy...common with off roading.
My thoughts...
 

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dirtrider7 said:
The Carnegie maybe the best of the alt bars IMHO with its slightly more modest 25 deg backsweep. I have been on a handlebar frenzy and just removed the Mary bar from my rig.
I am going back to a more conventional riser bar with 10 degrees backsweep. The reason is quite simple. Having experimented with many different bars, it is now clear to me why top riders ride a low backsweep bar and and not a bar with bigger backsweep. Keep in mind, top riders endure the harshest conditions on their wrists and hands and racers are the most vigilant of all about protecting against injury.. The reason I am going back to a more conventional mtb bar is because a pronounced backsweep causes the bar to run very close to the ulnar nerve with a natural wrist position. With less backsweep as with a conventional mtb bar, the bar handle runs more along the base of the fingers which is less stressful to the hand reducing pressure on the Guyon canal which if loaded for prolonged intervals can cause handlebar palsy...common with off roading.
My thoughts...
Bars are a highly personal choice, as is saddles, and tire preference, and color preference, and tubing preference........

Counterpoint:

1- he's riding rigid. The lower sweep bars allow the 'top riders' a better attack position critical to going fast on their suspended race bikes. The higher sweep alt bars better facilitate rigid riding requirements (i.e. use of arms to absorb impacts). What works for each person varys. Personally - I like the J-bar and it's 45 (I think) degree sweep.

2- since you used Lance in your example of a top rider using normal sweep bars (that's what I took from the context anyway, unless you really are Lance :skep: ), I'll offer that he spends a good deal of time in on his other bike in what we would refer to as an alt position in the MTB world. ;)



Carry on, use the bar, seat, tires, gears, water bottles, energy gels, helmet, gloves, shorts and tubing choice you prefer. :cool:
 

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mixed experience

I like the sweep, I ran the risers with the ends 'drooping', I had some brake issues.

The Carnegie's sweep is very natural for my needs: I run a Misfit Fubar on my city bike which I love the bends on, but the width is a little narrow for me on the trail and transitioning between the two bars was seemless. All of my bars end up below horizontal, when I try a new bar if the outside of my palm gets sore I tilt it back a bit, I have found that I end up with my bars swept down a bit regardless of whether it is my conventional Race Face Diabolus or my high sweep Misfit Fubar.

Not all was roses though, I like my brake levers set up with the end hook in front of my index finger and this is not possible with the Carnegie's. I regularly run first generation Shimano hydraulic levers and there is only enough control space for me to manage a two finger braking setup with the hook in front of my middle finger. I even tried a set of Avid Elixirs to see if a different brake would solve the issue, but I ended up with the same set up woes.

Oh, and how do you ride with the bar along the base of your fingers? If my bar doesn't pass across the centre of my palm I can't control the bike without a deathgip between my index finger and thumb which is a comfort killer.
 

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Re: Ragley Carnegie's Bar

I've been running the Aluminum riser Carnegie's on my stock Redline Mono-cog Flight for 2 months now with good results. I switched from the stock Syncros Fixxed h-bar (flat) with 11 degrees of sweep, and kept the cockpit dimensions identical.
I ride east coast roots, mud & rocky stuff, I'm 5' 10", 145 lbs.
I'm still fine tuning the 'feel' of the new bars and cockpit setup, but I am certain these bars are as stiff as my previous ones.
It's been said before in this and other posts, BUT- The new arm and wrist position allows my upper body to absorb shock better. I get less fatigue in my hands in stutter sections, and am able to relax my grip & let the front end do more work.
I started with them pointed at the rear drops, then slowly turned them up during a test ride. The carbon Carnegie's will be PLUSH, you'll love them.

Enjoy the ride-
 

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dirtrider7 said:
I am going back to a more conventional riser bar with 10 degrees backsweep. The reason is quite simple. Having experimented with many different bars, it is now clear to me why top riders ride a low backsweep bar and and not a bar with bigger backsweep. Keep in mind, top riders endure the harshest conditions on their wrists and hands and racers are the most vigilant of all about protecting against injury.
He rides a 26in wheeled bike, and wears lycra a lot. Are you going to copy that too?
 

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GreenLightGo said:
Bars are a highly personal choice, as is saddles, and tire preference, and color preference, and tubing preference........

Counterpoint:

1- he's riding rigid. The lower sweep bars allow the 'top riders' a better attack position critical to going fast on their suspended race bikes. The higher sweep alt bars better facilitate rigid riding requirements (i.e. use of arms to absorb impacts). What works for each person varys. Personally - I like the J-bar and it's 45 (I think) degree sweep.

2- since you used Lance in your example of a top rider using normal sweep bars (that's what I took from the context anyway, unless you really are Lance :skep: ), I'll offer that he spends a good deal of time in on his other bike in what we would refer to as an alt position in the MTB world. ;)



Carry on, use the bar, seat, tires, gears, water bottles, energy gels, helmet, gloves, shorts and tubing choice you prefer. :cool:
Lance is a great example because he is a champion both on and off road. He is an exceptional champion in other words. Plus, he is hypervigilant with both his set ups. He is a champion btw in part because of his attention to detail. His crew tech's at Trek say he can feel 1mm difference in cockpit change. I know I can feel 3 mm's. Also for a champion level road and mtb'er Lance rides a very pedestrian position on the bike with very little drop. For all Lance's unfathomable physical gifts, flexibility isn't his strength...hence his curved back that is so written about including TT position. If you ride both mtb and road, you know that the handlebar ergo's aren't in the same strata. I have ridden road for 30 years and yes Brant I ride Lycra even on my mtb on occasion. The hood position on a road bike is quite unlike the wrist position on a mtb with a high backsweep bar....the latter being more unfriendly to where the handle end crosses the palm with end of bar closer to the wrist. I will repeat, conventional mtb bike handlebars have evolved the way they have for a reason. The bar end position of a conventional low backsweep mtb handlebar which is important due to greater loading off road places less pressure on the ulnar nerve.
Perhaps the best example is to remove Lance completely as an example and ask a simple question. Name a single champion mtb'er who competes with a alternative handlebar? Simply look at the guys that ride for a living who protect at all costs against injury. You will see subtle variation in bar sweep, but I personally don't know of a single champion rider that rides over 8 degrees of backsweep.
 
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