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Discussion Starter #1
I'm usually too focussed on riding to dig my phone out of my bag and take my glove off to take a photo, say when a cute bunny is hanging out by the side of the trail for a few seconds.

  • I'd like a way to take still images with my gloves on, and without digging in a bag, within a few seconds of seeing an opportunity (I'd rather not have to wait for the camera to boot up and power on).
  • If it is shooting a stream of pics all the time, I'd like a way to turn it on/off easily with my gloves on. I mostly don't want to be taking pics of randos, who might be screaming "turn it off!"
  • I don't care about video, no one wants to watch my rides (except maybe at 100x playback speed).
  • Since I am getting started, I don't think it is a good idea to spend more than $100 to maybe $200 on this idea
  • If it is helmet mounted I don't want to look like a Borg
  • The only old cellphone I could sacrifice to this cause is an iPhone 4, and I am not sure how that would work well compared to a smaller camera with a push button or continuous recording


lots of bullet points, maybe I am in fantasy land?

maybe I should just put a cheap, lightweight camera in an easy to access pocket, that works with gloves on? I have a point and shoot that is the size of a deck of cards, but I can't imagine having it flapping around in my shorts pocket. How about something tiny that can fit in one of those CamelBak strap front pockets?​
 

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WillWorkForTrail
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Yeah, hmm. Your options are always going to be point and shoot for what you're looking. The question becomes what will not have to "wait for it to boot up" because all of these things want to power off after a certain amount of time, and the only way to protect the lens on most of them is to power them off or let them sleep. I have often wished there was a digital camera that didn't do anything but snap pictures, like a film camera only without film to develop. With that said, there's a company out there that makes replacement backs for certain cameras that converts a film camera to digital. The problem is most of those cameras are sought after film cameras, and the conversion isn't cheap, but it moves the direction you're talking about. Still....

Maybe the thing for you to do is go to a store that has some cameras on display where you can touch and manipulate them, and see what's in the price range that you feel like you could work with. It's amazing how good some of these tiny and cheap point and shoot cameras are.
 

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Maybe a GoPro either on 4K video or a burst mode?
I've never really used mine for photos but if it was on your helmet for example and it was set to photo mode, you could reach up and press one button.
Obviously there is no zoom but everything should be in focus.
 

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There's a few ruggedized point and shoot options, the Olympus TGs are generally regarded well. Attach a lanyard and put in a pouch attached to pack strap somewhere. I started years ago with Canons first waterproof rugged Powershot egg. It was pretty novel in design and actually worked pretty well. Its smooth egg shape made pulling in and out of pouch easy, no sharp edges to catch. I did sand down the interchangeable trim panels and coat with rubberize coating for better wet grip. It's image quality was never great and by current standard very dated, cell phones now take better pics. My riding buddy has success with varying interations of regular Powershots stored in a waterproof pouch with pop open top.
I now ride with a tank, the Nikon AW1 on a single point sling cliped into Spider Blackwidow holster. I can grab it while riding with single hand and snap a shot off while still riding and then reholster. The thing is very robust, but it finally is starting to act up. Prob moisture is messing with the electronics. Dunno if its worth having serviced, its no longer in production and the series has been mothballed by Nikon. Maybe now that Nikon has gone full in with some serious mirrorless, they will make a true Nikonos successor, but then that would be too expensive and prob a bit too big for what I use it for.
My friend is now using an Olympus TG.
On of my many images captured:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There's a few ruggedized point and shoot options, the Olympus TGs are generally regarded well. Attach a lanyard and put in a pouch attached to pack strap somewhere. I started years ago with Canons first waterproof rugged Powershot egg. It was pretty novel in design and actually worked pretty well. Its smooth egg shape made pulling in and out of pouch easy, no sharp edges to catch. I did sand down the interchangeable trim panels and coat with rubberize coating for better wet grip. It's image quality was never great and by current standard very dated, cell phones now take better pics. My riding buddy has success with varying interations of regular Powershots stored in a waterproof pouch with pop open top.
I now ride with a tank, the Nikon AW1 on a single point sling cliped into Spider Blackwidow holster. I can grab it while riding with single hand and snap a shot off while still riding and then reholster. The thing is very robust, but it finally is starting to act up. Prob moisture is messing with the electronics. Dunno if its worth having serviced, its no longer in production and the series has been mothballed by Nikon. Maybe now that Nikon has gone full in with some serious mirrorless, they will make a true Nikonos successor, but then that would be too expensive and prob a bit too big for what I use it for.
My friend is now using an Olympus TG.
On of my many images captured:
Nice. Yeah, I am also curious how you mount your spider holster; belt, pack strap?

This is all new to me, but I like the packstrap pouch ideas, since I could try it out with a point and shoot I never use, just to test the waters before buying a ruggedized camera.
 

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WillWorkForTrail
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If you get a waterproof camera, you can use something like the peak design capture clip too. I use that to keep my camera handy when I'm riding with it. But then, I have it on a 36L backpack full of (or potentially full of) camera gear, and don't use it every ride. I used to keep a cheap (read old) DSLR on a capture clip on my camelbak all the time with a $99 nifty 50 on it. Somehow or another, that camera still works, and my daughter has taken it from my collection to teach herself photography now.
 

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Not really cheap, but get Sony RX0 camera and attach it to your Camelbak strap with Peakdesigns Capture. https://www.peakdesign.com/products/capture

You can grab it with one hand, turn it on (it's quick), take a photo and put it back - without stopping your bike.

RX0 is waterproof and dropproof, has 1" sensor and makes nice clear pictures.
 

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The problem with the RXO is it can't decide if it's an action cam or is a stills cam. As a result it doesn't appear to do either. Probably may as well get an RX1OO for that kind of money.
 

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I use it as a stills cam. It is not an action cam because it lacks any stabilization. Mark II has some. RX100 is not waterproof or dropproof. I do adventure racing, so I need waterproof camera.
 

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Nice. Yeah, I am also curious how you mount your spider holster; belt, pack strap?

This is all new to me, but I like the packstrap pouch ideas, since I could try it out with a point and shoot I never use, just to test the waters before buying a ruggedized camera.
Realized since im the photographer, i jave no pics of myself and gear! Had to snap a selfie yesterday afternoon, excuse the lighting:

The holster is on the waist strap of pack. Sling is over shoulder attached to hardpoint threaded into tripod hole of camera. Only bad thing is the loop of the single point sling has no release, ideally it should to reduce choke hazard. This style holster needs a ruggedized camera. Otherwise you could do similar witg a lanyard but have a pouch somewhere.
i also use this setup with a waist(fanny) pack with the holster mounted on strap for lighter riding, and a chest rig for snowboarding.
 

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