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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fairly new member and getting back into riding for health reasons mainly (and originally) with some questions on bike fit; how the bike fits the body.
I've come across a 29 Mongoose in decent shape that I need to use before I make a total commitment to riding. I am 6ft, 208lbs and 58yo. Goal is 185lb. I am recovering from a total knee replacement (8 months) and bike riding is so much easier on all my joints than walking or stationary bike. L5 in lower back is also a concern since 2002.

The fit concerns are my overall center of gravity 'feel' while riding. The spot between thumb and forefinger that rest on the grips are under more pressure than should be, it is a top heavy feeling that even requires a shift in weight or posture while riding (because this part of my hand is under uncomfortable pressure). Originally, I set the 'oldman' style seat just about as high as safely possible to insure as much leg extension as I could get. Seat being this tall made it a little awkward mounting and starting. I have lowered the seat a couple inches to take a little of the topheavy feel and it is sorta better but I have looked at the bars and would like to raise them a couple inches or so to even my balance more. I dont think this design has that option of raising the handlebar height; some kinda feature on the bike, I cant figure the use out. Next option is to replace bars with some that turn up a few inches. I think it can be done without rerouting or replacing cabling.

Hope I have provided proper descriptions on my problem and you all have some simple solutions or alternative. I have an excellant spot for riding down by the river on trails cut from old railroad beds that were graded almost flat when designed. I rode bikes since I was a kid and went thru the ten-speed' age in the 70s and reared my kids on these same trails; have been a biker all my life (till I got old and fat with no time !) so I'm comfortable riding and love it. Ive no desire to further develop the lifestyle a lot of you all enjoy, just dont see it (yet) but find it the best way for me to get back in some kinda shape.

Any tips or advice on adjustments ?

Thanks, Willy
 

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It sounds like switching to a riser bar would help. I've switched out a flat bar for a riser before and I didn't have to do anything to the cables, it was an easy conversion. In my experience the riser made a big difference and positioned me more upright on the bike.

If/when you are fitting yourself to a new bike, use this as a guide, but ultimately base your decision on what feels right for you.

Bike Fit Calculator | Find Your Bike Size | Competitive Cyclist

Good luck and enjoy your rides.
 

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I would definitely invest in a proper bike fit. We can all give you proper advice but the best situation will be derived form having a professional look at you on the bike and see what needs to be tweaked based on your pain/comfort preferences. This will only ensure that you get the best out of your riding, knowing that you are making improvements to your fitness and not slowly hurting your body over the long term. Your local bike shop should be able to give you a good referral ;)

Enjoy the ride and be safe!
 

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I'm 62 and also had a total knee last August. I have been riding for over 30 years and believe that played a large role in a quick recovery for me. I was back on my bike 1 month after surgery, very gingerly at first. How is your range of motion, do you have full extension and 130 degrees or so of flexion? If you don't yet have the full range of motion you may have to keep your seat a little high til it improves. Cycling is a great way to improve r.o.m. I agree that getting a certified bike fitter to set up your bike is ideal It can cost 100-250 dollars and the proper fit may change as you get more flexible on the bike. Some fitters have more experience (or are physical therapists) fitting bikes to people with injuries or limitations. The gamekeepers thumb may prefer a bar with more sweep for example.
Sometimes you can get a free bike fit with the purchase of a new bike, If your current bike doesn't fit you well enough that may be an option for you. good luck
Google to find bike fitters in your area, if there are none people on this forum can help you get a ball park fit,
 

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I would definitely invest in a proper bike fit. We can all give you proper advice but the best situation will be derived form having a professional look at you on the bike and see what needs to be tweaked based on your pain/comfort preferences. This will only ensure that you get the best out of your riding, knowing that you are making improvements to your fitness and not slowly hurting your body over the long term. Your local bike shop should be able to give you a good referral ;)

Enjoy the ride and be safe!
+1 on that. Especially since you're rehabbing a knee. I think I paid 50 bucks for a fit 15 years ago. Once you've had one done for you, if you pay attention, you should be able to do it yourself after that.

Stems (angle and length) are interchangeable, and riser bars are also available for us old farts that require a somewhat more upright riding position. You can buy longer seat posts if necessary, and fore and aft position and tilt of the saddle also play a part in finding a comfortable position on your bike.

But it is really important that the frame be the right size for you to begin with. So when buying a used bike, find out what size the frame is, and check the manufacturer's recommendations for rider height before committing on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks fer the replies y'all; Ive been 'away from my desk' if you know what I mean. Some good shops here and I'll see what they've got.
 
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