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AussieLostInNyc
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650 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys,
I am just messing around with my 22" KM setup and want to know about fit.
I have an approx inseam of 36" if that's detail needed?
I am just about to try riser bars and a different stem. I had a 130mm with I think a 10 degree
rise with the flats and now a 90mm no angle with the 2" riser bars.
On first getting on the bike it feels a bit weird, okay sitting but I really notice the difference out of the saddle. I am not over the front wheel so much. Is this better for rolling down steepish rocks or over large log piles? Less chance of an endo at the bottom?

Is there an 'ideal' setup for our height range or is it always personal preference?
I notice a lot of specs when posted include a 130mm stem for taller riders.
I already feel like I am scooting back on the seat to stretch out a bit with the shorter stem.
Thank's for any feed back.
Gumby
 

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A hopped on pop.
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1,397 Posts
i'm 6'2", 35" inseam....

i ride a large kelly ro sham bo. the frame has a 25.5" effec tt, and i have a 100mm x 10* rise stem. i also run a carbon riser bar. my kelly is a single speed, so it's a wide bar, like 27" or so. my saddle and bar are pretty much level as well.

i guess that not being over the bars more would be better for technical/downhill stuff. that is one of the reasons why i like the long tt on my kelly, less chance to endo. also, it feels better on climbs.

cheers, hope this helps, let me know if you've got any questions/comments.



gumby said:
Hey Guys,
I am just messing around with my 22" KM setup and want to know about fit.
I have an approx inseam of 36" if that's detail needed?
I am just about to try riser bars and a different stem. I had a 130mm with I think a 10 degree
rise with the flats and now a 90mm no angle with the 2" riser bars.
On first getting on the bike it feels a bit weird, okay sitting but I really notice the difference out of the saddle. I am not over the front wheel so much. Is this better for rolling down steepish rocks or over large log piles? Less chance of an endo at the bottom?

Is there an 'ideal' setup for our height range or is it always personal preference?
I notice a lot of specs when posted include a 130mm stem for taller riders.
I already feel like I am scooting back on the seat to stretch out a bit with the shorter stem.
Thank's for any feed back.
Gumby
 

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featherweight clydesdale
Joined
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1,382 Posts
gumby said:
Is there an 'ideal' setup for our height range or is it always personal preference?
I notice a lot of specs when posted include a 130mm stem for taller riders.
I already feel like I am scooting back on the seat to stretch out a bit with the shorter stem.
Thank's for any feed back.
Gumby
It is a lot of personal preferance. I'm 6' 4" with 35.5" inseam. I like a 25" effective TT and a 110-120 stem. A shorter stem will make you more stable and less likely to endo going downhill or over logs. It will also make it a little easier to lift the front wheel. Downside is that you might miss some climbing stability.
 

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Registered
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4,040 Posts
Similar body dimensions (6'3", 36" inseam, long arms)...

...but I ride a 20" KM with a 100mmx5d stem and 27W"x2"H ProTaper riser bar...pretty much level with the saddle.

My friend who is a bit taller rides a 22" with 120x15 stem and Maxm CF riser. The 22" is just too much bike for me and I generally like big bikes.

No issues with climbing and the smaller frame and better SO clearance makes the bike feel more nimble to me. More neutral/upright position helps be keep the rear wheel weighted without having to shift back as much as compared to the 22" frame. Something I've grown accustomed too from my 5"x5" travel FS bike.

Sean
 

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what a joke
Joined
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2,280 Posts
talking smack bout my frame

Soupboy said:
...but I ride a 20" KM with a 100mmx5d stem and 27W"x2"H ProTaper riser bar...pretty much level with the saddle.

My friend who is a bit taller rides a 22" with 120x15 stem and Maxm CF riser. The 22" is just too much bike for me and I generally like big bikes.

No issues with climbing and the smaller frame and better SO clearance makes the bike feel more nimble to me. More neutral/upright position helps be keep the rear wheel weighted without having to shift back as much as compared to the 22" frame. Something I've grown accustomed too from my 5"x5" travel FS bike.

Sean
hey fella you know I will out climb you on my XL monkey!
 

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650 Posts
That must be a real stretch.

I am 6'6" with a 40" inseam. I am riding a custom frame with just over 23" of effective TT and a 110mm stem. I am very comfortable like this, especially as I am used to a very big saddle/bar drop on my 26" bike(see picture).



If the 90mm stem feels right you won't go back

P::..
 

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AussieLostInNyc
Joined
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650 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Further Question/s?

Thanks for the response guys. I took the bike for a quick spin today and have decided
I like the shorter stem. It is easier to pull the front wheel up and also to lock the front wheel and nose stand ( am I making up terminology tonight??)
Now I just need to find uses for this on the trail :D
I have two more questions;
- What difference does an angled stem make over a flat one. Does it change that ability to
lift the front wheel? I think I want that little more height that a 10 degree stem will give.

-Nightfire, I can see you are tall but how the hell do you get up onto that bike seat??
That is the most post I have seen :p I thought I pushed it when I rode my 26er.

Once again thanks for sharing your knowledge and opinions!
Gumby
 

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Registered
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650 Posts
How do I get on the seat?

The same way I would if my frame was 4" bigger and the seatpin was 4" shorter.

That isn't as long as some I have used. It is a 350mm Campag Record seatpin.

As for your question...

Apart from the relative length of the stem being slightly different it should raise your body and put more weight on the back wheel.

P::..
 

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featherweight clydesdale
Joined
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1,382 Posts
- What difference does an angled stem make over a flat one. Does it change that ability to
lift the front wheel? I think I want that little more height that a 10 degree stem will give.

-Gumby[/QUOTE]


It mostly affects your saddle to bar drop (the vertical distance from the top of the saddle to the top of the bar). This is a comfort v/s performance issue for most. The higher the bar, the more weight on the saddle, less weight on the hands, the less bend and stress on the back which is important if you aren't very flexible. The trade off is in climbing performance and aerodynamic riding position. You may also unweight the front end some, causing the front tire to push out in fast, loose corners.

Most people I know are comfortable somewhere between level and -3 inches. If you are in that range, and your back and arms are hurting after a ride, then try the higher rise stem.
 

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AussieLostInNyc
Joined
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650 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Ahhh.

Most people I know are comfortable somewhere between level and -3 inches. If you are in that range, and your back and arms are hurting after a ride, then try the higher rise stem.[/QUOTE]


I get it. Do you mean - 3 degrees like the stem on my roadbike so that it is actually parallel
to the ground where as a flat stem is still angled due to the head tube.
Why do they have raised stems? Is it to eliminate spacers for a cleaner look and also to give
more range of fit/comfort.
I do like the 2" riser bars I put on. I think I can justify the carbon version now to ease out
riding rigid.
Whilst I am on a thread; is it best to have your chain with a little slack in it or tight.
I am SS, I know I read this somewhere but if you answer it saves searching. :rolleyes:

Gumby
 

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featherweight clydesdale
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1,382 Posts
gumby said:
Most people I know are comfortable somewhere between level and -3 inches. If you are in that range, and your back and arms are hurting after a ride, then try the higher rise stem.

I get it. Do you mean - 3 degrees like the stem on my roadbike so that it is actually parallel
to the ground where as a flat stem is still angled due to the head tube.
Why do they have raised stems?
Gumby[/QUOTE]

Forget about the rise or no rise on the stem. The -3 is in inches, and it's the verticle distance between the top of the saddle to the top of the bar (at -3 inches, the saddle is 3 inches higher than the handlebar). Use the rise or lack there of in the stem to acheive your desired saddle to bar drop and nothing else.

Don't know anything about singlespeeds, but I used to run a little slack on my BMX bike as a kid if that helps??
 
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