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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m 6 weeks into recovery from a mtb accident that cracked my tibial plateau. As near as I can figure -since the accident happened so fast- the injury would not have happened if I wasn’t clipped in. I’ve been clipless since my 20s, now 53. I’ve always liked it, never wanted to use flats. Now I’m wondering about making the switch. I just read through the other thread about pedals and it seems like the half and half option isn’t too popular. Seems that I’d like being clipped in on the climbs and then have the option to unclip for any riding at speed.

This also could be because I’ve never had knee problems and I’m now over-thinking it all because I’m not interested in another major leg injury.

Any thoughts from people who have had a similar injury or have experience with pedals that clip on only one side?
 

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Broke collarbone and 3 ribs clipped in and went to flats. Haven’t regretted it, and enjoy the ride just the same. My case was a freak accident but flats allowed me to get the confidence back more quickly. 53 yo when it happened and now 55.

edit: tried to the hybrid. It is one more variable trying to get the pedal flat side up. Pure flats are easier.
 

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I'm also in the busted collarbone club but in my case I can't imagine how it would have gone any different had I been on flats.

In any case you gotta go with what's most comfortable for you but whichever one you commit to get the right pedals and shoes, not the hybrid half and halfs.
 

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Sorry about the injury.

Never done anything but flats. But as a new rider learning. My endurance level was so bad i had my feet on the trail more than my flats. So flats saved me from alot of injuries.

Whats the whole benefit anyway??? Is it just a firmer more efficient shoe???

I just recently switched to an oval on my stumpy and really like the efficiency gain. I noticed that i used to be able to vary my pedal stroke as different muscles tire. But the ovalpretty much focuses you on a specific pedal stroke. I wonder if an oval and clips are compatible or if it narrows any gains from clips. I guess im saying if you dont use oval now. Then try oval and flats. You may be pleasantly suprised!!
 

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I rode with clipless for almost all of my biking life. But I switched to flats less than 2 years ago and wouldn't go back. I have size 13-14 feet, so I got some big platform pedals (Pedaling Innovations Catalysts) and my feet love me. And I don't miss not being clipped in on climbs. I like being able to move my feet around when I climb, if I need to.

But the point of my post is that all two-sided pedals I've seen are really narrow and don't look like they would have much support. Having said that, I see Shimano makes some wide ones. https://www.roguefitness.com/shiman...MIgoWirN6V4gIVaR-tBh39HgK2EAQYAyABEgK2A_D_BwE

So, I should probably just erase this post, but I'm in too deep now, lol.
 

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Try stuff and stick with what you like.

My issue with Mallets and one sided were they did not accommodate fast action and decisions nor were they ideal as flats. Good flats with Five Ten shoes give me lots of climbing power and stick for air time and rough stuff.

FWIW, we've got several pairs of Chesters as great value performers but now I'd put OneUps in that category. They and a few others curve where the thin part is ends of the pedal and they have less expensive bearing rebuild kits. I realize the ball of the foot is often in front of the spindle and that style pedal is good for that plus hits rocks less often.

I suggest pump track time and jump practice time with flats to know how to keep the bike with you. When you're comfortable with that you'll probably not miss being clipped in and love the feeling of playing with gravity.
 

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Yep. I went to flats after many many years of riding exclusively clipless because I was tired of getting hurt in situations where I wouldn't have or it would have been less severe if I wasn't clipped in. It only takes a fraction of a second to unclip but for me that was plenty of time to make the difference in many situation.

The interesting part was how difficult it was to learn to keep my feet on the pedals, and that was with high-end pinned pedals and 510s. Gouging shins or calves on the pins was another "interesting" aspect.

I'll add that I feel that there are situations where clipless are a distinct advantage, but on balance I'm sticking with flats for my current mtbing.
 

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Riding Clipped in was the cause of the last few serious bike injuries I've had. After 20 years of clipped in, I got a pair of the new style thin flats. I can't bunny hop like I could clipped in, but at 65 I'd say that it's not that big a deal anymore. After trying a brief comeback on a pair of shiny new mallets, I'm back to flats, this time for good. A pair of new 5-10's has sealed the deal for me.
 

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I’m not looking to go to flats, but see many riders with them, along with various posts about moving to them. I wonder, occasionally, while riding, how I would like them.

One of the biggest questions for me is how to do you “hop” the bike? Meaning, what I do now to use my clipped in pedals to “hop” the rear over obstacles (curbs, step-ups, logs, etc) or around tight turns/switchbacks, or simply maneuvering the bike....how do you do that with flats?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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One of the biggest questions for me is how to do you "hop" the bike? Meaning, what I do now to use my clipped in pedals to "hop" the rear over obstacles (curbs, step-ups, logs, etc) or around tight turns/switchbacks, or simply maneuvering the bike....how do you do that with flats?
Do a search on 'how to bunnyhhop' for thousands upon thousands of instant results.
 

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One of the biggest questions for me is how to do you "hop" the bike? Meaning, what I do now to use my clipped in pedals to "hop" the rear over obstacles (curbs, step-ups, logs, etc) or around tight turns/switchbacks, or simply maneuvering the bike....how do you do that with flats?
Like this-

 

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I race XC pretty seriously. Also spend a lot of time on my road bike. Haven't done a tri in a while, but that is just a temporary break. I clip in for all of those.

I did 7000' worth of climbing yesterday on my flat pedal bike. I DO NOT like clipping in to that bike.
 

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One of the biggest questions for me is how to do you "hop" the bike? Meaning, what I do now to use my clipped in pedals to "hop" the rear over obstacles (curbs, step-ups, logs, etc) or around tight turns/switchbacks, or simply maneuvering the bike....how do you do that with flats?
Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Once you can learn how to hop and play around the correct way on flats it will make you a better clipless rider.
 

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One of the biggest questions for me is how to do you "hop" the bike? Meaning, what I do now to use my clipped in pedals to "hop" the rear over obstacles (curbs, step-ups, logs, etc) or around tight turns/switchbacks, or simply maneuvering the bike....how do you do that with flats?
You learn the actual skills and not the cheat methods that clipless pedals let people get away with.

Once you learn the actual skills on platforms and transfer back to clipless pedals (if you still like to ride with and use clipless pedals), you'll realize how you were cheating before. Pedal type doesn't change the skill, but clipless provides a way that people can cheat their way through it without learning ALL of the skill. If you learned it by cheating, you're going to have to UNlearn before you can make progress, though, and that process can suck.
 

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I have been using multi release cleats for many years and love them. Just pull any direction and your out instantly.
+1 for multi release

Over my decades of riding, I've have more stupid crashes from not being clipped in then I was. I definitely ride harder and more technical when I'm clipped. In the end, it's a preference.
 

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-1 on the mulit release, at least if you're riding technical terrain or tend to use a fair amount of body english. Way too unpredictable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
So maybe this is a stupid question but is “multi release” different than normal SPDs?

Thanks all for your advice. Very appreciated!
 

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You have your feet mechanically attached to you bike and somehow that seems safe?

I get the idea, I rode clipless since the dark ages and before that toe straps, but just because you can doesn't make it safe.

It's like skiing, yeah it's fun, yeah being clipped in makes it easier, but that still doesn't make it safe.

I only ride flats, no way I'll go back to clipless; I also gave up skiing and boarding after an MCL tear.

In the end, this is the only body you will get in this life, so you get to choose how you use it (lose it).
 
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