Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Cloxxki, I have a question,
I seem to remember you talking about having back pain when riding and that the only thing that helped you was tilting your saddle downward?
In other words having the nose of the saddle lower then the back. Am I right in this? I tried a search but did not come up with the thread that I though I saw in the past.
If this is true could you elaborate on what the problem was and how you fixed it (how much of a tilt etc.).
I am have trouble with my back when riding and have been looking at fit, stretching, core work, etc. So far nothing has helped.
I'm a long time lurker haven't posted much. (ride a Waltworks 29er)
Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
I have found that in winter my back muscles are a bit less supple and find my saddle position is slightly different in winter to summer. Try lowering the saddle a touch. Generally for me, lower back pain is related to saddle height and outer thigh muscle or knee problems are related to saddle fore and aft. In my expierience, the angle of the saddle is more related to putting pressure on your 'undercarridge'
 

·
Recovering couch patato
Joined
·
14,019 Posts
Hey redclayrambler,

I think you summed it up nicely. With a level seat, I want to arc my lower back to relieve the boys. relieve boys, strain back...
Tip of seat down (maybe 1cm but it looks like a lot), and all at once the back can be kept straight and strong without discomfort.
I *could* reach the same position, although not relative to gravity, by using a many degrees slacker seat tube angle, shorter top tube and an 8" taller handlebar. I actually have this exact setup on my city bike. The huge seat is level but okay for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
817 Posts
Cloxxki said:
Hey redclayrambler,

I *could* reach the same position, although not relative to gravity, by using a many degrees slacker seat tube angle, shorter top tube and an 8" taller handlebar. I actually have this exact setup on my city bike.
and I bet your bar is still below your saddle :eek:

how bout a pic of the city bike
 

·
Bored
Joined
·
1,982 Posts
I think Bob has more to it. Your back problems probably indicate a combination of bad fit and lacking flexibility.

1. Try stretching your hamstrings out. Will help a lot. Stretching all muscles helps a great deal for that matter.

2. Strengthen your core muscles. It's all about balance.

3. Have your position evaluated by your trusted LBS, or fit expert. Our bodies change over time and what may have fit us well for 10 years, doesn't always later in life.

4. See your doctor if problems persist. trying to make changes may only agrevate the problem. Maybe a pinched disc from a wipeout, or fall (not even on the bike).
 

·
Recovering couch patato
Joined
·
14,019 Posts
There's an anatomic "preference" that's gotta be be different for everyone. The ideal position of the behind on the seat for comfort, and the required lower back bend to reach it without sitting like a sail.
Sorry, the one digicam I ever had broke on itself soon after I got it. City bike is an 80's traditional Dutch bike style.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
I know Jan Gerrit, and we have different builds. He is (and I hope he'll excuse the phrase) supersized, being long and gangly and I'm more regular and more thick set in my upper body (lots of rugby and karate when young) with shorter arms. I'm only 6 foot and he's quite a bit taller.

I'm sure his position suits his body type, I just find mine changes a bit dependent on the season. Also too heavy gearing in cold weather strains my lower back a bit, around this time of year, I put a larger cog on the back.

I would like to say that my 'boyz' have grown by 10% since moving from 26" to 29" bikes. Which is nice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The cold weather theory is interesting, also remember if you are wearing layers your butt is going to be a little bit higher off the saddle, so it would make sense to lower the saddle a smidge to keep the same distance as without the layers.
I notice The Wobble Naught sizing system recommends a slightly lower saddle nose. But most other fit systems do recommend a flat saddle which is what I have always used in the past.
I Do quite a bit of core strengthening and stretching already, bike fit is something I am looking at as well. That being said I do occasionally have back problems off the bike as well, it's just that lately riding has seemed to cause a lot more pain then before...............probably time to go see the doc :mad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Just to reinforce that it's diffrnt strokes etc - I actually run my saddles with the nose tilted up a bit as it helps make sure my sit bones are supported on the flat back portion of the saddle - otherwise i creep forward onto the nose of the saddle which is when you get perineum squash and 'boys' trouble.

I get a bad back from time to time as well, but have found strengthening and stretching along with a balanced overall position on the bike the best remedy. I think often people have positions in which they need to overload certain muscles in order to 'hold' that position. Achieving a natural and comfortable feel on the bike where you don't need to 'strain' to hold the position is the key to making sure you're not overloading any muscles and thereby creating problems with your back/shoulders/arms/whatever. The position which allows you to do this varies greatly as illustrated by the extremes of my and Cloxxki's examples.



You should also keep in mind that 'back pain' can be the result of a variety of causes (muscular, disc, skeletal...) so any solution needs to be specific to 'your' problem.

Sam
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
big & single said:
Just to reinforce that it's diffrnt strokes etc - I actually run my saddles with the nose tilted up a bit as it helps make sure my sit bones are supported on the flat back portion of the saddle - otherwise i creep forward onto the nose of the saddle which is when you get perineum squash and 'boys' trouble.



You should also keep in mind that 'back pain' can be the result of a variety of causes (muscular, disc, skeletal...) so any solution needs to be specific to 'your' problem.

Sam
Sam,
Looks like you ride a Brooks B-17? I do as well and find with the Brooks I run the saddle "nose" up as well, but on Padded saddles I run level., I find the Brooks take a bit of nose at least for me.

Happy Trails,

CT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Captain - yes it's a Brooks but a Swift. Basically it come down to needing the back portion of the saddle which you sit on to be flat. On saddles which have some 'dip' to them this means the nose is angled up. Totally flat saddles I can run pretty much flat.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top