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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got my first set of hydros today (hope minis). In the rear, the line comes out towards the back of the bike at a right angle from the seatstay, can i just loosen the bolt a little to swing it around with out loosing fluid or having to bleed the brakes? Also the inner piston doesn't want to retact, is that just because they're new and need a couple hundred pulls to work 100%?


Thanks

Andy
 

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Huh? Out the back?!!

thebikedoctor33 said:
I got my first set of hydros today (hope minis). In the rear, the line comes out towards the back of the bike at a right angle from the seatstay, can i just loosen the bolt a little to swing it around with out loosing fluid or having to bleed the brakes? Also the inner piston doesn't want to retact, is that just because they're new and need a couple hundred pulls to work 100%?

Thanks

Andy
Are you sure some one didn't sell you a not-so-new brake? I cannot visualize a brake line coming off 90deg to the seat stay AND out towards the back of the bike.
However, having said that I'm pretty sure (though I haven't done it) that you can loosen off the nut ever-so-slightly and rotate the hose angle to face forward, without using fluid. The end fitting is designed for this, I think. I just can't think of why it got twisted around. Mine were delivered ready to use facing forward.
On the inner piston try pushing it back with a flat bladed screw driver ( take wheel and pads out first) and exercising it a few times. It should not need more than a few pulls to sort out. Download the manual (from Hopetech) for the Mini before doing anything heroic. Also you can usually get DOT 5.1 fluid from a decent motorbike shop. Some come with DOT 4 instead, so make sure you order the right stuff. You aren't supposed to mix the two.

FD
 
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Regarding the piston retraction issue

The seals on Minis can be quite tight when new. To get the pistons moving freely try extending and retracting them one at a time by removing the pads and using a flat screwdriver to hold one piston in place while extending the other by squeezing the brake lever carefully. Once extended, push the piston back flush with the caliper using the screwdriver. Be sure to put even pressure on the piston so that it stays square and doesn't bind. If it does bind, just push it out a bit by squeezing the lever slightly while holding the other piston in place. Repeat this five or six times on each side.

Be sure to use care not to squeeze the lever too much or the piston will pop out and you'll have a real mess on your hands! 4 or 5mm of piston showing when extended is plenty. To be safe, take it easy with the lever until you see how far the piston moves with each squeeze. For really stubborn pistons you can lubricate them with silicone plumbers lube, which is what Hope uses to lubricate the seals when they assemble the brakes.

The folks at Hope gave this procedure to me when I called them when my pistons weren't moving out to compensate for pad wear. When this happens you have to pull the lever further and further before the pads contact the rotor. Anyway, I use this procedure from time to time and my brakes are better for it. Good luck.
 
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