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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got my first bike gt outpost ( sigh.. i wish i had money ) 2 months ago or so.. and felt that the fork was pretty geased up. by now its pretty dry and not as bouncy as it was. how often are you supposed to put grease on? And do you need a different kind than plain ol' chain lube?
 

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Weekend Warrior
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Ok Jim, time to learn what a shock is. He in fact does have a shock built into his fork, like many others out there. Without a shock he would be riding a rigid fork (which would probably not be much fun).

Ok, so I'm only taunting you, and hopefully keeping any ideas from being misconstrued to a new guy. I know we all hate to misinform but get so used to simplifying things that we often do.

Serious though man, don't grease that puppy. It's probably just working into itself, getting broken in. Bouncy = bad unless you enjoy flying over the bars.

Don't yell at me too much Jim, I's'a only playin'.
 

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mtb57jim
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Here's a question, My grandson just got his bike out of the shop after taking it in because it didn't shift right, went to ride it's still not shifting, he called the shop back they say it was cross shifting, I have not heard the term cross shifting what does that mean ?
 

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Biker 4 Life
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mtb57jim said:
Here's a question, My grandson just got his bike out of the shop after taking it in because it didn't shift right, went to ride it's still not shifting, he called the shop back they say it was cross shifting, I have not heard the term cross shifting what does that mean ?
Yu could just start your own thread. :thumbsup:
 

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mtb57jim
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Thanks I'll give it a try. Just thought i would ask.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
first of all i DID read my entire manual and i DO know its called a fork! and it didnt say anyhting about this.. i figured since it CAME pretty greased up that it should stay that way?? but apparently not.

and i didnt actually mean bouncy.. i just meant absorbant like any good fork should be.

but thanks
 

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~Disc~Golf~
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it shouldn't be greased up...maybe that was the problem?
possibly the previous owner thought they could make a bad fork better by greasing it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
i bought it new.. Maybe i said it wrong. On my other parts like derailleur i see globs of grease.. it wasnt like that on my fork .. you couldnt see globs or anything but when you touched it it was slightly slick
 

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~Disc~Golf~
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stop gettin your bike parts from the bottom of a McD's dumpster!!
You shouldn't have 'globs' of grease on anything IMO.

The 'slightly slick' on your fork should be from internal oil. (which needs to be replaced from time-to-time)
As far as your fork goes, you need to do some research to see IF anything can be replaced (o-rings, wipers etc) and what oil it takes (weight-wise) to do a reconditioning. I would not spend too much tho, the parts and your time ( I do a min. of $10/hr) will quickly surpass the cost of a new fork.
Since it's a new fork, I wouldn't do anything; except sending it back because it's toast.
- hey, at least you came to the right place! :thumbsup:
sorry I cant help you more... I feel for ya !
 

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Tri-Flow everything even your shock. Dont grease, thats bad. Grease likes to pick up little things like dirt, rocks and event he occasional squirrel. If you lightly oil with a product like Tri-flow after every ride, you shouldn't have a issue.
 

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joshman108 said:
I got my first bike gt outpost ( sigh.. i wish i had money ) 2 months ago or so.. and felt that the fork was pretty geased up. by now its pretty dry and not as bouncy as it was. how often are you supposed to put grease on? And do you need a different kind than plain ol' chain lube?
Grease is often placed below the stanchion seals to help reduce stiction. Depending upon the quality of the seals, some of this grease, or perhaps some of the oil bath may weep out. You should wipe it away after you ride because, otherwise, it'll attract dust and dirt which'll just hasten the demise of the seals.

There are a couple of lubes that you can use on the stanchions though.

The first is, amazingly enough, called Stanchion Lube. The stuff is made by Finish Line. I've used it in the past with seals from Enduro Fork Seals to reduce stiction after installing new seals. The stuff really does work.

The other thing you can use is Silicone Spray Lube. Just spray it on, using a clean rag behind the stanchion to catch the overspray. Use the same rag to work it into the stanchion, especially around the seals. Compress the fork a few times to work it down below the seals. Wipe off any excess lube.

You should also replace the fork oil at the intervals prescribed by the fork's maintenance schedule. (See the manual.) If the fork's damper uses an open bath system, the same fork oil that's used for damping is also used for lubing the seals. Loss of oil from the damper side could cause poor or unpredictable damping. I'm not sure though if this would cause the fork to be "not as bouncy" as it once was. My guess is that the lack of bounce is more due to increased stiction.
 

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Weekend Warrior
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^ what he said. Haha, thanks for the advice for us all Kevin. Always a pleasurable read.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
forgive the newb!! but whats stiction?

and i understand what you mean by Stanchion Lube but then whats fork oil?
 

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joshman108 said:
forgive the newb!! but whats stiction?
It's a blend of the words in the term "static friction". Wikipedia's article is pretty good: Stiction.

With regard to your fork or shock, it refers to that extra bit of force needed to get your fork to start sliding. Recall from high school physics that the coefficient of static friction is higher than that of sliding friction. Of course, lack of lubrication causing increased stiction will also caused increased sliding friction too. However, this may just feel like increased damping. It's not really the kind of damping that you want, however, since what's really going on is increased wear of your bushings, seals, and stanchions.

Bottom line: If you decrease stiction, you will, in all likelihood, also decrease sliding friction, which in turn should increase the lifespan of your fork's bushings, seals, and stanchions.

and i understand what you mean by Stanchion Lube but then whats fork oil?
Finish Line Stanchion Lube is, I think, teflon suspended in some sort of carrier. I think the carrier evaporates leaving behind the teflon. (Certain chain lubes work this way too.)

Fork oil is quite different. It is, literally, oil contained (somewhere) within the fork lowers and serves two purposes: 1) Lubrication of the bushings and seals. 2) Damping.

A fairly wide range of oils may be used for oil that's used for only lubrication purposes. Oil that's used for damping, must be of a particular weight recommended by the manufacturer. (Some folks will play around with the weight of the oil to obtain either more or less damping though.) Some examples of fork oil are: Fox Suspension Fluid, Golden Spectro Oil (used in Marzocchi forks), and Rock Shox / SRAM Performance Oil. Note that the latter comes in several different weights.

Some of these are quite expensive; I'm told that less expensive alternatives might be found at your local motorcycle shop. As mentioned above, you do have to be careful to use the correct weight oil in the damper. If the damper oil and bushing / seal oil are separate, you can often use a quality synthetic motor oil for lubing the seals and bushings. This is even recommended by certain fork manufacturers. If your fork uses an open bath system, you'll need to use the expensive stuff (of the appropriate weight) on the damper side. You can probably get away with something cheaper on the spring side. Often, though it's not worth it to use something else on the spring side, since a relatively small amount of oil is used on that side.
 

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~Disc~Golf~
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'stiction' is when your fork / shock resists coming back to top or your sag height because of something (seals) 'grabbing' it.
Usually going down is smooth enough because you have your body weight behind it; but coming up, your air and/or spring may not have the force to drive it back smoothly (I can see the replies coming now - I'm sure I didn't explain it right! :D)
 

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highdelll said:
Usually going down is smooth enough because you have your body weight behind it; but coming up, your air and/or spring may not have the force to drive it back smoothly
I think stiction is a problem even when starting a compression. Suppose you're cruising down a smooth section of trail and you suddenly hit a bump with your front wheel. A fork with less stiction should feel smoother (than a fork with greater stiction) because less force is needed to start the fork moving. In other words, the fork can react quicker, thus allowing the spring and damper to absorb more of the bump earlier. If you were able to increase stiction by turning a knob, you'd gradually turn a suspension fork into a rigid fork.

It's not clear to me how big (or small) a problem stiction is at the bottom of the stroke. Remember that stiction stands for "static friction". While it is true that the fork is reversing direction at the bottom of the stroke and is, therefore, stopped for a short period of time, it's not clear to me if that period of time is long enough for the necessary molecular bonding to take place. If it is, I'd expect there to be a slight hesitation before springing back.
 
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