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It looks like the piston was cracked and you made a new one?!! I can service my shocks and forks, but this is an entirely new level, makes what I do look like a caveman with a stick.
 

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Where can I get chicken skin gloves like that?
I have grabbed them at lordco and Canadian Tire before.

My work gets them from uline

 

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It looks like the piston was cracked and you made a new one?!! I can service my shocks and forks, but this is an entirely new level, makes what I do look like a caveman with a stick.
I don't think so, looks like they're making a clamp which you see in the photo after the lathe pic.

Cracked piston is there again with maybe a 3d printed (?) tool for further disassembly.

OP is probably going to get blacklisted by Push since he's exposed the super secret stuff inside.
I also like that apparently they're from China, will we be seeing a new DNM shock soon??
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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OP is probably going to get blacklisted by Push since he's exposed the super secret stuff inside.
Nothing in that shock is special, all proven technology that has been around for decades. Having two circuits is a novel idea and approach, but as you can see, rather simple in execution.

It's cool to see the internals, but disappointing how many special tools are required. The bike industry's ideas about how frequently you should shocks in for service and such as just totally unrealistic. It's still not something most bike shops can deal with and until it's as easy as changing a tube, they got a long way to go. There are examples of stuff that is rather simple and easy to take apart, like these RS rear shocks, but most stuff isn't designed like that and it sucks for us in the end.
 

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Nothing in that shock is special, all proven technology that has been around for decades. Having two circuits is a novel idea and approach, but as you can see, rather simple in execution.

It's cool to see the internals, but disappointing how many special tools are required. The bike industry's ideas about how frequently you should shocks in for service and such as just totally unrealistic. It's still not something most bike shops can deal with and until it's as easy as changing a tube, they got a long way to go. There are examples of stuff that is rather simple and easy to take apart, like these RS rear shocks, but most stuff isn't designed like that and it sucks for us in the end.
In all fairness to Push the service interval on an 11-6 is much greater than the 100 hour service for other shocks. At least in my experience but $160 for a factory rebuild once a year is a bargain.
 

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Speaking of special tools, does anyone have or can anyone suggest a tool that will help me turn the high speed compression knobs (the outer silver knobs). Mine are really tight and hard to grasp with bare fingers. I tried a golf cleat pin tool but it wasn't quite the right diameter.
1944429
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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In all fairness to Push the service interval on an 11-6 is much greater than the 100 hour service for other shocks. At least in my experience but $160 for a factory rebuild once a year is a bargain.
The problem is that rebuild is subject to lead times, backups, planning, other logistics. Again, until this can be done by a local bike shop like changing a tire (which would make it as easy for any home mechanic to do), it's still unrealistic. I get cha, it's not that bad...but when you have multiple bikes and shocks, it quickly piles up. I've gotten the Super Deluxe rebuild down to less than an hour and know it pretty well inside and outside now. Not really proud of that, it's still kind of bad, from taking on and off a metal lock-ring multiple times it eventually wore out and my reservoir cap shot off like a shutgun slug a few weeks ago, ruining the reservoir can in the process. In other words, it's not meant to be opened and re-valved 6 times, gotta replace some of the parts when you do. But again, at least it's easy enough and doesn't have any funny fittings.
 

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The problem is that rebuild is subject to lead times, backups, planning, other logistics. Again, until this can be done by a local bike shop like changing a tire (which would make it as easy for any home mechanic to do), it's still unrealistic. I get cha, it's not that bad...but when you have multiple bikes and shocks, it quickly piles up. I've gotten the Super Deluxe rebuild down to less than an hour and know it pretty well inside and outside now. Not really proud of that, it's still kind of bad, from taking on and off a metal lock-ring multiple times it eventually wore out and my reservoir cap shot off like a shutgun slug a few weeks ago, ruining the reservoir can in the process. In other words, it's not meant to be opened and re-valved 6 times, gotta replace some of the parts when you do. But again, at least it's easy enough and doesn't have any funny fittings.
Even if the shock hardware was standardized, there would still be a service problem if you're looking at it in the context of your everyday bike shop. They don't want to do it. There isn't enough margin because they don't get enough suspension work to justify the training and labor cost since the techs won't likely ever be efficient at the job...when you compare to the margins on overhauls and flat tires. There are surely some higher end shops that want to be able to do it as a matter of pride, but I'd bet that if it's not in an area that's heavy with people who need work (Whistler comes to mind) you'll never get the level of expertise that you would otherwise get by sending it to someone who knows this stuff inside and out...like Jeff Menown in Ashland.
 

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I also like that apparently they're from China, will we be seeing a new DNM shock soon??
This is implying that it's apart so it can be copied?

I get that China has a well deserved reputation for IP theft, but let's separate the nation from the person eh? I'm thankful that he posted disassembly photos of two shocks that interest me...both in the past week. It's nice to see.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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Even if the shock hardware was standardized, there would still be a service problem if you're looking at it in the context of your everyday bike shop. They don't want to do it. There isn't enough margin because they don't get enough suspension work to justify the training and labor cost since the techs won't likely ever be efficient at the job...when you compare to the margins on overhauls and flat tires. There are surely some higher end shops that want to be able to do it as a matter of pride, but I'd bet that if it's not in an area that's heavy with people who need work (Whistler comes to mind) you'll never get the level of expertise that you would otherwise get by sending it to someone who knows this stuff inside and out...like Jeff Menown in Ashland.
Internals will never really be "standardized", as in interchangeable from company to company. All I'm talking about is simple stuff. Don't use some ridiculous fitting where the same can be done by a socket or flat wrench, use standard sized seals and fasteners, bleed-ports so you can accomplish a bleed at home/without special equipment, basically make it so you can take it apart without having to special order tools that will end up costing more than the shock is worth. That's not a lofty goal IMO...but it's definitely not a goal or on the board for most shock manufacturers.

Seems almost like a chicken and the egg situation. They can't be efficient at it and need all sorts of special training because they go out of their way to make the servicing take all sorts of special tools and skills.

IMO, this is also what leads to so many trashed shocks...where bikes and shocks become disposable units, because they are so prohibitive to servicing.
 

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Internals will never really be "standardized", as in interchangeable from company to company. All I'm talking about is simple stuff. Don't use some ridiculous fitting where the same can be done by a socket or flat wrench, use standard sized seals and fasteners, bleed-ports so you can accomplish a bleed at home/without special equipment, basically make it so you can take it apart without having to special order tools that will end up costing more than the shock is worth. That's not a lofty goal IMO...but it's definitely not a goal or on the board for most shock manufacturers.

Seems almost like a chicken and the egg situation. They can't be efficient at it and need all sorts of special training because they go out of their way to make the servicing take all sorts of special tools and skills.

IMO, this is also what leads to so many trashed shocks...where bikes and shocks become disposable units, because they are so prohibitive to servicing.
I get what you're saying, but you also have to realize that by using standard fittings some people, who are wholly unqualified, are going to attempt to disassemble them and will either ruin something at best, or blast themselves in the face because they didn't know to depressurize it first. The proprietary fittings are likely in part because it's a CYA move to prevent dum dums from doing dum dum things and then suing the manufacturer.

IMO, specialized tools required to get into something is akin to having a technical feature at the very start of a hard trail to sort out those with too much hubris.

The idea that a shock becomes trash because it's hard to service doesn't hold water for me, or maybe it's indicative of our society where we'd rather toss and replace than repair. There's a big psychological component to this too...one that I've been discussing a little lately with someone at Push and a couple of pro racer friends of mine...a surprising number of people honestly have absolutely no idea if their shock is functional anyway. It blows my mind because I'm a bit "princess and the pea" and that's my schema for understanding how and why things work the way they do, but two of my riding buddies in the last week had no idea that their shocks needed major service until I told them about it.
 

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Speaking of special tools, does anyone have or can anyone suggest a tool that will help me turn the high speed compression knobs (the outer silver knobs). Mine are really tight and hard to grasp with bare fingers. I tried a golf cleat pin tool but it wasn't quite the right diameter.
They're 4 sided so any wrench of appropriate size will work.

The problem is that rebuild is subject to lead times, backups, planning, other logistics. Again, until this can be done by a local bike shop like changing a tire (which would make it as easy for any home mechanic to do), it's still unrealistic. I get cha, it's not that bad...but when you have multiple bikes and shocks, it quickly piles up. I've gotten the Super Deluxe rebuild down to less than an hour and know it pretty well inside and outside now. Not really proud of that, it's still kind of bad, from taking on and off a metal lock-ring multiple times it eventually wore out and my reservoir cap shot off like a shutgun slug a few weeks ago, ruining the reservoir can in the process. In other words, it's not meant to be opened and re-valved 6 times, gotta replace some of the parts when you do. But again, at least it's easy enough and doesn't have any funny fittings.
There is nothing in these shocks precluding normal service. It's just the subscription model trying to actively discourage it.

In my experience only the absolute best bike shops can do a rear shock service properly. Most of those shops offering damper service. Shouldn't be.

For those lock-rings. Push your fingernail down on the side opposite the gap and the ring spins 90 deg and can be pulled out without any damage or wear.
 
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