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Discussion Starter #1
There are tons of info on how to set up a Pugs, but I haven't seen too much on how to ride one. Here are a few things I have learned in the few rides I have done. By the way, all of my experience relates to snow riding.

- Wear sunglasses. If there is any sun out at all, the glare will be incredibly bright. Always have them in your bag on a pugs ride.

- The further you get your weight back, the more terrain you can ride. It allows the front to float and the rear to dig in. I'm even considering a seatpost with more rear offset just for this.

- Learn the cyclocross mount. If you don't know this, it's very valuable. If you're stuck in the snow and can't seem to get started. Run along side the bike for a few strides and then hop on the seat. It'll allow you to start with momentium.

- Wait a few days after a big snowfall. The pugs doesn't work good with fresh powder. Wait until the weather allows the snow to firm up...usually a couple thaw/refreeze cycles.

- Ride often to learn the various snow conditions. Even if you can't go far, give it a shot. The more experience you have with the snow conditions, the better your rides will be.

- Be careful with transportation. I figured my bike would be fine since I was only riding on the snow. I didn't consider all the crap that flies onto my pugs on the ride to and from the trail. Think about all the salt and dirt that is on your windshield. If your bike is on your roof/trunk, it's seeing the same thing.

- Go as fast as you can and plow the bike into a snowbank. Yeah, it's just fun to do!

Does anyone else have anything they have learned by riding the pugs?

Chris
 

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I've ridden snow here in Maine for a couple of years. Not so much on streets but in the woods. Setting your weight to the rear is a very good tip. It both gives the rear tire more grip and allows the front to ride up and make the "almost" compacted track for the rear wheel to follow. Also when conditions are iffy for flotation a front weight bias will stop you in your tracks.

Another heads up is to stay loose over snow covered roots, rocks etc. The tires will side step as they slip over off cambered obstacles. Usually you can recover easily if you just let the bike find it's balance.

I rode the Endomorphs today through very difficult, techincal deep woods trails. Only 4-5 inches of snow and very light but what a great time - I'm still smiling. Can't wait til someone stumbles onto those tracks :D
 

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Compulsive Bike Builder
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Sand riding is a little different

Riding on the beach is a little different. Having the rear dig in is a bad thing in deep sand because you *never* get to a point of traction, you just get stuck. You must think "float" on the sand. It is best to get your weight forward, as I have never had the front wheel sink in, only the rear. I got a longer stem, a Thomson post for no offset, and I slid the saddle forward a little.

Develop a perfectly smooth spin. Any hot spots in your spin will be revealed instantly. I have had a few riders recommend a roller trainer, I have yet to try that, but it sounds good. Run tire pressures as low as you dare. I usually go 8 psi rear 10 front, but I am still playing with lower pressures.

Riding at 4 mph in the sand does not warrant a helmet. However, with no headcover at all you will burn your face and neck easily. Wear a hat with a brim. Many options and opportunities for style points here, I like Kiwibiker's or patirwin's options.

https://wildworks.co.nz/csr/images/photos/img_0944.jpg
https://www.freespiritwear.com/images/patex.jpg

Given the low speeds of sand riding, many sand riders loose the front brake, there is just no need for all the stopping power of two disc brakes.
 

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I have to disagree on one

ctxcrossx said:
- Wait a few days after a big snowfall. The pugs doesn't work good with fresh powder. Wait until the weather allows the snow to firm up...usually a couple thaw/refreeze cycles.
Some good stufff, but I've found the pugs absolutely plows through fresh snow. After getting a couple feet in a week or so I just couldn't stop riding! The sound of the fresh snow crunching under those ridiculously huge tires is really cool.

I was going through dry powder that was up to the front hub and it was surprisingly easy. It was really dry powder and I just motored. Once you get this thing up to speed its unstoppable.

Then it warmed up and things started packing on the rims and such, but it was still a lot easier to ride with the Pugs than any other bike I've ridden. We're supposed to get another 2-4" today so I'll have some fresh stuff to do some more field testing.
 

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AK Chris said:
Some good stufff, but I've found the pugs absolutely plows through fresh snow. After getting a couple feet in a week or so I just couldn't stop riding! The sound of the fresh snow crunching under those ridiculously huge tires is really cool.

I was going through dry powder that was up to the front hub and it was surprisingly easy. It was really dry powder and I just motored. Once you get this thing up to speed its unstoppable.

Then it warmed up and things started packing on the rims and such, but it was still a lot easier to ride with the Pugs than any other bike I've ridden. We're supposed to get another 2-4" today so I'll have some fresh stuff to do some more field testing.
I have to agree. I took my Pugs out for the first time on saturday. I found it much easier to plow across the wide open spaces where nobody else has gone. As opposed to where people had already walked, snowshoed or xc skied.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Haystack Calhoun said:
I have to agree. I took my Pugs out for the first time on saturday. I found it much easier to plow across the wide open spaces where nobody else has gone. As opposed to where people had already walked, snowshoed or xc skied.
I think it probably has a lot to do with the location and the amount of snow. My first ride was in 4" of untracked powder. It was perfect. An incredible ride. The next storm dropped about 8-9" of heavy, wet snow. I couldn't even move the pugs because there was so much snow. I went out and tried and apparently the conditions weren't great for the snowshoers, XC skiers, and even snowmobiles. Everyone I talked to said that it would be much better after the snow firms up. I live in CT, by the way.

Chris
 

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Just got back in from a 12 mile ride

in fresh snow we are getting in NE WI the powder is 4-5" deep. The Pugs takes some effort plowing/floating through the deep snow but stability and the fun factor is far beyond what I could have imagined. I have it setup with 1.54:1 ratio as a SS it goes well and what really surprised me was the hills I could climb yes the rear wheel broke loose but constant easy pressure kept me riding up very steep hills. I had to stand to climb but the traction is incredible. I guess this may be more fun than any 47 year old guy should be having but move over youngsters I am out on the road riding the coolest bike known to man.
 

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more riding tips

I've had more experience with Pugs in the sand and rocks. The key is pressure: How much is enough, and when to change it. For mixed sand and rock I like close to 15psi. That's enough to give some cushion without slamming those pricey rims in the rough stuff. I do ride it on hardpack just for giggles and have run as much as 20psi when I knew things would be packed and fast. I haven't found a good pump to take along with an accurate guage under 20psi. That would make things easier to set up prior to the day's ride. Today I actually had the first longer ride on a snowpacked trail ( only a few inches over dry trail, whoopee) and again tire pressure seems to be the key. Under 10psi and I was able to even hit the brakes and slow down instead of go sledding.
The main thing that just plain take getting used to is tire deflection on rock and hardpack. I raced Pugsley at the 24hours of Moab and the only place that felt unnerving was going all out (25mph or so) on the crown of hardpacked two-track. There was lots of counter steering and there was no way I was taking a hand off the bars to grab a drink. One thing I did do which helped was use a Fizik Arione road saddle. I've been running them for years for comfort and took the Bontrager Race Lite I had off Pugsley in favor of the longer Fizik (lots longer). This allows me to steer from the saddle when standing on the pedals in the rough stuff and counter steer on slickrock and hardpack which minimizes the weightless feeling the tire casing rolling side to side.
The Endomorphs are great springs but there is no damping in big rock. At speed you have to predict where and how far you and your purple Zeplin are going to bounce. It's actually alot of fun, but it ain't plush suspension. Moderately deep sand doesn't require any major riding techniques and deep sand just needs more speed. The best solution is miles, lots and lots of miles. So grab your Pugsley and recycle.
Tom Miller
Kokopelli Bike and Board
Cortez, CO
 

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My cup runneth over
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Not a Pugs owner/rider but a regular in the snow. One of the interesting things I find is that in super dry snow I have much better traction in the untracked snow that the semi-packed snow. I can manage up to about four inches with the usual (non-studded) 2.1 inch tires in flatish terrain but get no traction at all in even beaten down snow on the same terrain. I think it is because when the snow is extremely dry (cold temps etc) the beaten down snow is not bonding and slips more easily than the untracked. Just a thought...
 
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