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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to buy Vitus Sentier 27 vr soon once it becomes available. When I'm driving on asphalt pathway with a friend, what should be the PSI of the front and rear tires?
What if I'm on a dirt trails, what should be their PSI settings?

Thanks!
 

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Rippin da fAt
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I'm going to buy Vitus Sentier 27 vr soon once it becomes available. When I'm driving on asphalt pathway with a friend, what should be the PSI of the front and rear tires?
What if I'm on a dirt trails, what should be their PSI settings?

Thanks!
1. Rider weight.
2. Tire size.
3. Rim width.
4. Street session or cruising along.
5. XC, freeride, DH.

Need some detail here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
1. Rider weight.
2. Tire size.
3. Rim width.
4. Street session or cruising along.
5. XC, freeride, DH.

Need some detail here.
oh, I was just preparing myself once I get my new bike. I don't have much information yet. But I'm planning to buy Vitus Sentier VR 27. I tried to populate items as best as I can.

1. Rider weight - 155 lbs
2. Tire size - 27.5"
3. Rim width - 2.60"
4. Street session or cruising along - light dirt trails for now
5. XC, freeride, DH - I've seen light down hill trails in our area but would love to cruise along with my friend who has a XC bike. I'll definitely lock the front fork since we'll be on asphalt/concrete path.
 

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Rippin da fAt
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MIld or gentle riding on 2.6's, start out around 15-18 psi and get on your bike, take a look at the tires. A minor drop in the tire is not an issue. A major drop in the tire, add some air. Experiment with tire pressures.
Getting rowdy? Add a few psi.

2.6 is the smaller end of high volume tires and they run at lower pressures than the old 2.1's we all know from times been and gone.

155, you're light enough that you have no need to run max psi unless you want to shake yourself to pieces!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
MIld or gentle riding on 2.6's, start out around 15-18 psi and get on your bike, take a look at the tires. A minor drop in the tire is not an issue. A major drop in the tire, add some air. Experiment with tire pressures.
Getting rowdy? Add a few psi.

2.6 is the smaller end of high volume tires and they run at lower pressures than the old 2.1's we all know from times been and gone.

155, you're light enough that you have no need to run max psi unless you want to shake yourself to pieces!
Sweet! Thanks a lot!
 

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Sit on it and see how the tire is squeezed. When static just allow some deformation. Observe when riding so you don't have rim strikes. Adjust. as required

numbers are meaningless and inaccurate anyway. There are online calculators to get a starting point.

Once you find a good pressure, use the same gauge. Again, actual number doesn't matter, but be consistent.
 

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Rippin da fAt
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Using a quality gauge will make handy the ability to repeat a setup for specific terrain. So, in reality, numbers can matter. Will they matter in the beginning, not so much but with time and experience, yus.
I keep a list of pressure points for conditions for a collection of bikes to make quick setups possible.
 

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Most gauges aren't calibrated. Calibrated gauges are calibrated until you drop them on the floor. Proper calibration would require a 50 foot cliff and an equal length tube of water (way higher for road bike pressures). That's why many people are giving you methods besides a number. You really can't trust what numbers other people tell you unless you use the exact same gauge.
 

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Most gauges aren't calibrated. Calibrated gauges are calibrated until you drop them on the floor. Proper calibration would require a 50 foot cliff and an equal length tube of water (way higher for road bike pressures). That's why many people are giving you methods besides a number. You really can't trust what numbers other people tell you unless you use the exact same gauge.
No, that's not why nobody is giving a specific number.

The reason for that depends on things you can't quantify. Things like preference, the trails you ride, and how you choose to ride those trails.

I'll be honest. I don't change the pressures in my mtb tires if I'm riding on pavement. I don't ride on pavement much with my mtb, so the differences don't really matter to me.
 

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Rippin da fAt
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Most gauges aren't calibrated. Calibrated gauges are calibrated until you drop them on the floor. Proper calibration would require a 50 foot cliff and an equal length tube of water (way higher for road bike pressures). That's why many people are giving you methods besides a number. You really can't trust what numbers other people tell you unless you use the exact same gauge.
Surely, you jest...
 

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Bring a pump with you on the ride. If they feel low, add a little bit. You want more pressure for less rolling resistance on pavement, usually within a psi range indicated on the sidewall. Less pressure equals more traction on the trail, but not so low that you are banging the rims on stuff. A gauge will help you find what works for you
 
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