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This place needs an enema
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

Not hard to imagine this scenario: You've just finished a busy week of work. You're tired, run down, aware more than ever that you aren't getting any younger. But you recognize that summer in the alpine is fleeting, ephemeral, oh-so-precious. You know you'll be lethargic on the climb, but you're acutely aware that you'll feel umpteen times better if you get some rarified air in your lungs, incinerate some endorphins, and liberally paste your shins with wildflowers that didn't have the good sense to grow outside the trail tread.

You motivate.

With limited daylight left you know it won't be an epic. You reach for the light pack, fill a single bottle, don helmet, shoes, chamois, gloves, and head out.



The climb is slow, as expected. But the world -- despite how advanced summer already is -- is a riot of greenery and wildflowers. Lupine, columbine, aster, paintbrush, skyrockets, larkspur, mules ears, and limitless skunk cabbage stretch to every horizon. You aren't moving fast, but you're *exactly* where you want to be.



90 minutes of climbing -- some of it deliciously technical -- bring you up to the limit of where trees can grow, providing views so expansive you can't quite focus on distant ranges. Could be the lack of oxygen. The grade relents and you feel the inexorable, delightful, never-not-amazing pull of gravity as you start to gain speed. A trickle of spittle hangs in the corner of your mouth, so heavily are you salivating over the approaching descent.

Within the first hundred meters your speed increases to the point that you can pump, carve, and hop the bike easily. You immediately remember why you're OK with a 30# sled, so capable is it once beyond walking speed.

But then -- a noise: thwapthwapthwaphissthwaphissthwaphissthwapHISSSSSSSSSSSSssssss.



Gah. Never even saw it until it was *in there*.

A cursory glance shows that plugs -- even many, stacked -- just aren't going to solve this. You break the bead, pull the valve, stick in the tube that's been rattling around unused in your pack for -- how long?! -- and start pumping.

The bead seats. Pressure is enough -- or so you hope. Who even knows what pressure to run with tubes anymore?!

As you install it back into the frame it happens: ssssssssssssssSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSsssssssssssssssss.

Removing the wheel again you discover that the base of the valve in that old tube has cracked, failed. Irreparable.

Damn.

Your riding partner offers his tube, which quickly proves to be even older than yours, and won't take any air. With not a single patch between the two of you, your ride just ended.

You bid your riding partner good luck as he begins the much-anticipated descent.

You turn 180* and begin walking your bike back down the hill.

You possess the presence of mind to enjoy the views as you walk, acutely aware that 30 extra grams worth of patch kit would have allowed you to solve this problem sans hoofing.



Check your kit before your next ride. Don't let this happen to you!
 

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Ugh!
That sucks.
Flats are so less common today....
In the past few years.....when I got that rare flat...
Like you....I have found the rotted tube.
I have had zippers on seat packs or Camelback seized and frozen from lack of use.
I had a frame pump on my road bike disintegrate when I needed it because it hadn't been used in years.
And then there's the patch kit that the glue has dried up and all the patches are as brittle as potato chips.
And as much as it sucks.....these are 1st world problems.....hey, you got some great pics, right?
 

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This place needs an enema
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17,090 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Also: It cost me 79 cents worth of aquaseal and the tire is repaired as though it never happened. Not realistic for an on-trail repair but works well and reliably once back home.
 

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Been there done that. Ripped a derailleur off my bike right as we got to the top of a ride. Being well prepared I declared it a non-problem as I carried a spare hanger. What fool wouldn't? Go to install the spare hanger and something isn't right. Hmmmm....ya it's the spare hanger for my "summer" bike. The one in my garage. Not the hanger for the bike I am riding. :(

Engage coast/run mode to the car.

I now have a dedicated frame bag for each bike that has its specific stuff in it that I go through at the start of the season. Since I leave it attached to the bike I never have to wonder if I have the right stuff.

Well except after I use/loan out a spare item and then don't replace it. I have to stay vigilant about that. ;)

Good attitude about the walk back Mike. Riding is better than walking, but time outside exercising is better than time inside doing most stuff.

You also helped your buddy figure out he had a bad tube! ;)
 

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Been there, quit carrying a repair kit due to no having any flats for two years then of a span of three month I had two flats where I had to hike back to the truck. Lesson learned for now at least.

Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
 

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I once burned through 3 tubes at about a mile per. Mine, plus 2 from others. Puncture then dry-rot at the stems. Looking back I can't believe that after the 2nd one I kept heading outbound. Should have realized it was a sign and cut my losses.

Thinking back, that was 2012. Bought spares for myself and buddies. Chances are at least 1 of the 3 of us still has that replacement in our pack. :D
 
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