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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I have now got enough miles under my belt with my prophet 2000 to categorically state that this bike BLOWS my old Jekyll out of the water in terms of performace.
Admittedly my Jekyll was a year 2000, model 2000 so it only had 100mm suspension and 'older' technology, but it was still a damn fine bike and a great descender for an XC type bike.

My prophet absolutely ROCKS. My setup is stock with a few small changes....203mm disc up front, Monkeylite bar & oury grips, UST Spiders, NON dual control shifter/brakes and Time ATAC pedals and thats it.

This bike is SO stable, even in XC position, at high speeds. It goes where you point it. No bouncing around. No losing my line. It just LAUGHS at anything I can throw at. Its a magic carpet ride on the rough stuff. It begs for more. I am pretty much sure that I will never get to the point where its not enough for me, whereas my old jekyll was very much a hindrance to my descending abilities - prompting me to upgrade to a new bike....the prophet. I think I'll take the last rites before I try it in the freeride position.

Somebody on this forum said the suspension takes a while to 'settle' or get 'broken in'. I agree. I was pretty disappointed the first couple of rides. Ok, I needed to tune the suspension, but still....it didnt seem that great. Now???.... buttery smooth on low speed impacts and less harsh than the first couple of rides. Just incredible at high speeds.

Climbing is a dream. Bob ? Who he ?

Do it.

Buy one.

Ride.
 

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The_Missile said:
Ok, I have now got enough miles under my belt with my prophet 2000 to categorically state that this bike BLOWS my old Jekyll out of the water in terms of performace.
Admittedly my Jekyll was a year 2000, model 2000 so it only had 100mm suspension and 'older' technology, but it was still a damn fine bike and a great descender for an XC type bike.

My prophet absolutely ROCKS. My setup is stock with a few small changes....203mm disc up front, Monkeylite bar & oury grips, UST Spiders, NON dual control shifter/brakes and Time ATAC pedals and thats it.

This bike is SO stable, even in XC position, at high speeds. It goes where you point it. No bouncing around. No losing my line. It just LAUGHS at anything I can throw at. Its a magic carpet ride on the rough stuff. It begs for more. I am pretty much sure that I will never get to the point where its not enough for me, whereas my old jekyll was very much a hindrance to my descending abilities - prompting me to upgrade to a new bike....the prophet. I think I'll take the last rites before I try it in the freeride position.

Somebody on this forum said the suspension takes a while to 'settle' or get 'broken in'. I agree. I was pretty disappointed the first couple of rides. Ok, I needed to tune the suspension, but still....it didnt seem that great. Now???.... buttery smooth on low speed impacts and less harsh than the first couple of rides. Just incredible at high speeds.

Climbing is a dream. Bob ? Who he ?

Do it.

Buy one.

Ride.
Shouldn't leave out the advantages of 13.7" of ground clearance in the equation. Nice to ride without smacking the pedals off of rocks.
 

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Out riding my Scalpel
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Man those Prophets are so nice

I was thinking of selling my 2003 Jekyll or trading it in at my LBS and getting a Prophet in the near future. Cannondale does have a great trade-in program according to my LBS. But I have a 2005 Scalpel now so I'll just hold on to my Jekyll in the mean time. Great bikes make great fun. Prophets are darn sweet rides.
 

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The Missile - help needed

The Missile

Read your post with a lot of interest. I'm in a very similar position to you in that I mainly ride XC, don't do huge drop-offs and own a 2001 Jeckyl 3000. I've always thought highly of the Jeckyl and while the suspension is no longer the latest and greatest, I appreciated the lock outs front and back and the overall package.

I've been pondering whether to upgrade to a Prophet and whether it is a big step up from the Jeckyl - is it worth the change or do I stick with the Jeckyl. Love the Prophet 4000 but way too much money. The 2000 fits the bill nicely but really don't want to try the XT dual controls and realise that I don't like them and likewise I cannot be convinced that rapid rise rear derailer is the way to go. I was interested that you went to rapid fire - any reason other than similar concerns to mine about the dual controls ????

Did you keep the XT brakes or change to another brand and on a similar note did you put the oversize Easton bars on - I was thinking about putting a standard stem and bar as I don't need the additional strength.

I have a large in the Jeckyl (I'm 5' 8" and 175 lbs) and tried the large and med prophet but found the large felt better - any comment on size??

I'd greatly appreciate your feedback

Thanks in advance
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
.....spec changes on the Prophet

I loved my 2000 jekyll 2000 with a passion. It was an upgrade from a Y22 which was nice as it was my first FS, but the Jekyll blew it away. The Prophet is yet a again a step (or even maybe 2) change from the Jekyll.

I do mostly XC but love to blast my way down hill when I get to the top. Here in the Jura we have no choice. We can really only go up, to come down again. Doh...but what I mean is there is really not much flat terrain. I don't do drop offs but we have a number of freeride/DH courses around here (les gets, morzine, chateaubief, portes du soleil, verbier, villars) and I used to be out of place on those on my Jekyll, but elsewhere it was perfect.... until I realised the Jekyll was old technology having ridden next to a guy with a new Jekyll which started everything........anyway......the prophet will now deliver on those courses for me, but thats a bit moot now as I also have a gemini 2000 which my wife thinks I'm selling. :eek: :eek:

....I hated the look of the Dual control (big deal huh), and no matter what people say, it looks fragile........as someone has in their avatar "if its more complicated there is more that can go wrong".....for hi speed descents I am not convinced gear changes wouldn't happen accidentally due to being bounced around.
I was recommended not to get them for my style of riding and I was easily convinced. On the plus side, a set of XT rapid fire levers and XT brakelever as separates are way cheaper than the dual control so the $ to change was minimal.

I looked at putting another brand of brakes on but the $ cost was not a great incentive. I have many friends who have the XT hydraulics and they are well pleased. I have to say they rock and are better than my Hayes I had before. I also put on a 203 mm disc up front because my 160mm hayes, even when bled correctly were not powerful enough. This setup is like throwing an anchor out!!

I went for the Monkeylite based on prior experience - vibration damping is great and light and BOMBproof. I stayed with the fat bar because the stem was already specced fat and the weight difference is peanuts and the cost would have been more.

I took Time ATAC pedals because Shimano and mud don't go together. My old Time pedals have been flawless.

Larger bikes have a longer wheelbase...longer wheelbase = higher stability, all else being equal of course. If you have a large Jekyll now I would expect a large Prophet would be the right sitze, but go with whatever feels right.

And finally....what planet are the folks at Cannondale from with the price of the 4000 ??
In the US its expen$ive enough but here in Switzerland....approx 7500 US$ :confused:

I bought my 2000 in the US way cheaper than here and saved approx 35%.

so...enough...I have work to do :D :D :D :D
 

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Go Prophet

Thanks for the valuable information. I'm from Australia and thought the US$6000 price for the Prophet 4000 was high but I'm now glad I'm not in Switzerland - but then again from my experience in Switzerland, nothing was cheap !!!!

I appreciated your comments and I'd have to say we are on the same wave-length. The only exception is that I'm keen on egg-beaters, but other than that I think you've got the perfect setup - well done.

Hope you continue to enjoy the Prophet and the hills.
 

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Hybrid Leftys aren't real
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Roger9 said:
Thanks for the valuable information. I'm from Australia and thought the US$6000 price for the Prophet 4000 was high but I'm now glad I'm not in Switzerland - but then again from my experience in Switzerland, nothing was cheap !!!!

I appreciated your comments and I'd have to say we are on the same wave-length. The only exception is that I'm keen on egg-beaters, but other than that I think you've got the perfect setup - well done.

Hope you continue to enjoy the Prophet and the hills.
Ouch, I feel for you guys overseas, those prices are HARSH!! Have you tried the dual controls? Have you tried them for more than a parking lot test? They make absolutely no sense in these conditions. Try them for a week or two on your trails, and it will be much more apparent why they are a good thing. People keep saying" oh they're so fragile, they'll break" I have yet to see it, or hear of it, except in circumstances where anything would have. Remember they move on more axis's then any other brake lever, why would that make them break more?They are also no more complicated than rapidfires, so that point is a nonstarter. The rapid rise makes no sense either, till used with dual control, in the woods, at which point again, it comes into it's own. It drives me nut's how averse people are to them without even using them other than in the parking lot, 6" of travel is pretty pointless there too, except to say wow, that's a lot of squish.... cool. I have used them for 3 years now, and actually switched back to them from the lame X9's that came on my 4000. As the Missile said, keep the OS bars, they are nice, stiff, and too much is never enough for some things. Egg beaters rock too. Whatever you do though, get a Prophet, your gonna smile so hard it's gonna cramp your cheeks!
 

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*Double Dutch* said:
Best bike ever ...!!!!
I agree this bike is tops. As for the Dual control levers they seem ok. For the first month I hated them and kept unintentionally shifting, especially on steep decents and jumps. The past 2 months have proved different. Once used to them, they seem pretty functional and rarely mis-shift as before.
 

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MarkHL said:
Shouldn't leave out the advantages of 13.7" of ground clearance in the equation. Nice to ride without smacking the pedals off of rocks.

Yup.. the same ground clearance that means I have to d rop the bike into Freeride and modify the front wheel bracket with an empty coffee cup in order for my roof-mounted rack to be able to reach the frame....
 

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I was going to buy the 4000 at $5000 but wanted to change some components. I had my LBS buy the frame and fork direct and build me a custom bike - they built an even higher end bike for the same price. The 4000 is v overpriced. You could custom build it with the stock components for about $700 less!

The_Missile said:
I loved my 2000 jekyll 2000 with a passion. It was an upgrade from a Y22 which was nice as it was my first FS, but the Jekyll blew it away. The Prophet is yet a again a step (or even maybe 2) change from the Jekyll.

I do mostly XC but love to blast my way down hill when I get to the top. Here in the Jura we have no choice. We can really only go up, to come down again. Doh...but what I mean is there is really not much flat terrain. I don't do drop offs but we have a number of freeride/DH courses around here (les gets, morzine, chateaubief, portes du soleil, verbier, villars) and I used to be out of place on those on my Jekyll, but elsewhere it was perfect.... until I realised the Jekyll was old technology having ridden next to a guy with a new Jekyll which started everything........anyway......the prophet will now deliver on those courses for me, but thats a bit moot now as I also have a gemini 2000 which my wife thinks I'm selling. :eek: :eek:

....I hated the look of the Dual control (big deal huh), and no matter what people say, it looks fragile........as someone has in their avatar "if its more complicated there is more that can go wrong".....for hi speed descents I am not convinced gear changes wouldn't happen accidentally due to being bounced around.
I was recommended not to get them for my style of riding and I was easily convinced. On the plus side, a set of XT rapid fire levers and XT brakelever as separates are way cheaper than the dual control so the $ to change was minimal.

I looked at putting another brand of brakes on but the $ cost was not a great incentive. I have many friends who have the XT hydraulics and they are well pleased. I have to say they rock and are better than my Hayes I had before. I also put on a 203 mm disc up front because my 160mm hayes, even when bled correctly were not powerful enough. This setup is like throwing an anchor out!!

I went for the Monkeylite based on prior experience - vibration damping is great and light and BOMBproof. I stayed with the fat bar because the stem was already specced fat and the weight difference is peanuts and the cost would have been more.

I took Time ATAC pedals because Shimano and mud don't go together. My old Time pedals have been flawless.

Larger bikes have a longer wheelbase...longer wheelbase = higher stability, all else being equal of course. If you have a large Jekyll now I would expect a large Prophet would be the right sitze, but go with whatever feels right.

And finally....what planet are the folks at Cannondale from with the price of the 4000 ??
In the US its expen$ive enough but here in Switzerland....approx 7500 US$ :confused:

I bought my 2000 in the US way cheaper than here and saved approx 35%.

so...enough...I have work to do :D :D :D :D
 

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Mcs

MendonCycleSmith said:
Ouch, I feel for you guys overseas, those prices are HARSH!! Have you tried the dual controls? Have you tried them for more than a parking lot test? They make absolutely no sense in these conditions. Try them for a week or two on your trails, and it will be much more apparent why they are a good thing. People keep saying" oh they're so fragile, they'll break" I have yet to see it, or hear of it, except in circumstances where anything would have. Remember they move on more axis's then any other brake lever, why would that make them break more?They are also no more complicated than rapidfires, so that point is a nonstarter. The rapid rise makes no sense either, till used with dual control, in the woods, at which point again, it comes into it's own. It drives me nut's how averse people are to them without even using them other than in the parking lot, 6" of travel is pretty pointless there too, except to say wow, that's a lot of squish.... cool. I have used them for 3 years now, and actually switched back to them from the lame X9's that came on my 4000. As the Missile said, keep the OS bars, they are nice, stiff, and too much is never enough for some things. Egg beaters rock too. Whatever you do though, get a Prophet, your gonna smile so hard it's gonna cramp your cheeks!

I agree 100% with most of your post. I've never questioned that the dual controls are more fragile - as you said if they moove in more directions they are obviously less likely to break. I've only used the dual controls in the car park as I haven't had any other opportumity. My only real logic is that I believe rapid fires have worked really well for many years and naturally any change is resisted (initially). I liked the simplicity of the rapid fires but agree that inside the "box" there are many inticate parts that can go wrong, but as a gear change they always served well and like most tools they become instinctive.

I suppose the biggest problem for a lot of people is that the dual controls combine a different shifting method with the added change of rapid rise rear derailer - its a lot of change in one hit and I can understand the need for a bit of time to get used to it .

Like most people on this forum, I'm not necessarily adverse to anything, but use initial gut feel about something to promote further discusion AND knowledge - this is a great forum made better by all contributors.

Thanks Guys
 

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My first bike is a road bike that came with the STI shifting. even thought they are not the same as the dual control shifter, they have a lot of things in commons. i like dual shifter, not because it shift better but it looks better and have a cleaner looks. the DC shifting is different than the RF shifting, but not better or worse. i don't think people should switch it out before they have really test on it for a week or two. again this is my two cents.
 

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Jeykl 2000 is faster

The_Missile said:
Ok, I have now got enough miles under my belt with my prophet 2000 to categorically state that this bike BLOWS my old Jekyll out of the water in terms of performace.
Admittedly my Jekyll was a year 2000, model 2000 so it only had 100mm suspension and 'older' technology, but it was still a damn fine bike and a great descender for an XC type bike.

My prophet absolutely ROCKS. My setup is stock with a few small changes....203mm disc up front, Monkeylite bar & oury grips, UST Spiders, NON dual control shifter/brakes and Time ATAC pedals and thats it.

This bike is SO stable, even in XC position, at high speeds. It goes where you point it. No bouncing around. No losing my line. It just LAUGHS at anything I can throw at. Its a magic carpet ride on the rough stuff. It begs for more. I am pretty much sure that I will never get to the point where its not enough for me, whereas my old jekyll was very much a hindrance to my descending abilities - prompting me to upgrade to a new bike....the prophet. I think I'll take the last rites before I try it in the freeride position.

Somebody on this forum said the suspension takes a while to 'settle' or get 'broken in'. I agree. I was pretty disappointed the first couple of rides. Ok, I needed to tune the suspension, but still....it didnt seem that great. Now???.... buttery smooth on low speed impacts and less harsh than the first couple of rides. Just incredible at high speeds.

Climbing is a dream. Bob ? Who he ?

Do it.

Buy one.

Ride.
aerial
 

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Jekyl 2000 v prophet 2000
Jekyl faster uphill due to lighter rotational wheelset
Prophet faster downhill due to bigger and heavier wheelset
Prophet does not replace Jekyl
End of story
Cheers Steve
 

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Is there that much difference between an 04 Jekyll and an Prophet? The 04 Jekyll (1000), has the 140 mm travel.
 

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Hybrid Leftys aren't real
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I suppose the biggest problem for a lot of people is that the dual controls combine a different shifting method with the added change of rapid rise rear derailer - its a lot of change in one hit and I can understand the need for a bit of time to get used to it .My only thoughts on this are these, the reason dual control works well with rapid rise is this. I hated rapidrise previously because it reversed many years of thinking and shifting, and royally screwed up my head. By having a totally different shifting concept, it allowed me to try it without confusion. The first dual control bike I had, I said to myself, I'm gonna hate this rear derr, and switched it to a low normal traditional for the first few rides. Then I switched to the rapid rise for a few, just to be fair. To my amazement, the rapid rise was a huge improvement. It allowed my shifting to be easier to manipulate when it needed to be (climbing hills, shifting to easier gears, just knock your knuckle into it), and the derr, could decide when to make that shift, as opposed to my telling it, and it COMPLAINING as it did what I asked. When going fast, I can dump like five or six gears down without going clicka clicka clicka clicka. Just one smooth sweep, done. Very hip. Again, do what you like, but if you are of an open mind, don't discount it till you have tried it, you can always go back, with the knowledge that at least you know know.
 

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O.T. comment

I just wanted to add that I've rode just about every shifter component out there.

I've been on Dual Control & Rapid Rise for over a year now & let me tell you those who discredit them without riding them for more than a few rides have no clue to the joys they are missing.

These things rock. ;)

Stich
 

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Wooooooooo Hoooo!

Finally, after way too many weeks of staring at my Prophet 2000 sitting sadly in my living room, I just got back from my first ride on the beast! Here is just a quick first impression, I'll post a decent review when I have more time on it on more varied and 'Prophet-worthy' trails.

It was just a one hour ride on some very tame terrain but it was enough to show the potential of the bike: it's just amazing! It's gonna be very fun this season. The geometry is just perfect for me, it climbs great on or off the saddle with tons of traction and it's easy to shift my weight for cornering like I was on rails and going down like crazy: the bike is so stable it almost feels slower than it really is. I was in the XC mode. Now, I just need to un-learn my 'Genesis-geometry-riding-over-weight-shifting' and get adjusted to the bike.

I still had the Maxxis tires and, yes you all know it already but: they are beasts! As soon as the climbs get a little steep, they sure make their presence known. Not only are they very heavy, they may be high rollers but aren't very fast rollers. Combined with my early season physical condition, my friend riding his brand new Scalpel 2000 had to wait for me a bit... they'll be out of there very soon, I already have replacements ready to be mounted but I wanted to try them even tough I knew they would be a pain: now I know for sure.

I still have to fine tune the suspension, particularly in the back (the recommanded settings seemed way too harsh but I lowered the PSI a bit too much), but that Lefty Max has to be the best fork I ever tried. I had a bit too much pressure in the SPV but I'm still impressed. It's as nervous and stiff as my old headshok but the action is smooth as silk! I didn't do any drops or jumps yet but I tried hitting any obstacles I could find and it just felt so smooth and steady.

Other things I noticed: I think Shimano improved their Dual-Control levers. I had a full 2004 XT group last year and was happy with it but the 2005 XT with rear XTR shifts are quicker and more precise than it ever was on my last bike. Maybe it's just the XTR rear or the much better cable routing compared to my old bike (Fisher Cake 1_DLX 2004) but it's a great system IMO. I know a lot of people hate them (most without much experience on them) but after a year on Dual-Controls, I'm very happy about them.

Did I say the Maxxis tires are slow and heavy?

Now, I just need to get back into shape. I will pickup my 'climber's jersey winning' road bike this week to train, do some serious milage when I can't get to some trails during the week but really, I can't wait to hit some long and crazy trails with the Prophet.

:D
 
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