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Kathleen in AZ
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to the big-camera scene - just got a Canon Rebel T3i and am having a blast with a Rokinon 8mm lens. Here are a few recent wide angle biking shots around AZ.
 

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Nice!

BTW, the Rokinon lens is made by Samyang and can be bought under many different brandings, including Samyang, Rokinon, Bower, Polar, Falcon, Opteka, etc. Sometimes the more obscure names are cheaper to buy in online auctions because most people don't search for all. =)
 

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Kathleen in AZ
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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Hi Durtgurl,

Just had a look at your shots. You have a good eye. If you're new to the photo gig you appear to have a natural flair for angle and composition, particularly if the composition in your shots are not achieved on PS.

If you don't mind, I'm going to critique your shots.....:thumbsup:

Shot 1.
When shooting into the sun like this the colours tend to get washed out. There are 3 ways to help control this;
a: try and place the sun behind a tree trunk or a simular object, this'll cut down on excessive light hitting the lens allowing for a longer exposure which = deeper colour saturation. It also helps control aperture flares, as seen int the bottom left of the top right hand quadrent.
b: use a full flash gun to give you fill light, this doesn't particularly help with colour sateration but it'll give much better detail in the rider.
c: use a polerizing filter or better still, stop down, say maybe 1 stop or back off the shutter speed.

Comosition is good, balance is good. there is a 3rd's rule in photography, in this shot you have roughly 1 third of sky / open scene grafted to 2 thirds eye catching content.

Shot 2.
This shot is grossly over exposed, but on a positive note, it's well exucuted. A shot like this needs to be set up prior to shooting. For an excelent result you really require a proper flash. Here's what you do:
a: with no rider in the frame you set your exposure meter to multi segegment or whatever it's called on your camera.
b; You then take a reading of the scene, preferably in manual. Take note of it.
c:Then set up your flash to fire at ~ 30% output, set up your shot and fire away! This is all done in manual btw.

Shot 3.
This shot has some very strong points that make it work despite the fact it's a 50 / 50 shot. That is, practicaly 50% sky 50% land. What makes it work is;
a: the colour in the sky is rich, but it's got a lovely light cloud in it to offset the blue.
b: the cloud is behind the rider and so balances the rear of the shot.
c; The rider balances the front, or right of the shot.
Now, the only thing about this shot is the fact that only those of us who roar around on bikes really know what sort of speed this bloke is doing in the corner. Joe public hasn't got a screamin' clue.....! so, to get around this one uses shutter control coupled with panning. OK, shutter control means you must drop your shutter speed way down....way down....back it off to a quarter of a second or whatever the slowest speed your apeture will allow. Now, when the blokes comes hammering around the corner, lock onto him in the view finder BUT....DON'T shut your other eye, keep it open to get a full picture, now follow him and as you do so hit the shutter. If you can set up rapid fire on your camera, do so and peel off a series of shots, keep your concentration on your moving target, let the camera do it's thing. You're looking at getting a nice sharp image of the rider with the background blured to impart movement. Practice..... it's very effective once mastered.
btw, the other reason this is a nice shot is the fact that the colour has good saturation, I suspect this was shot in either the early morning or late afternoon + it has a bit of offset angle to the sun. It's these times that are best to shoot in as the light has a softness to it. In technical terms, the light temperature is low, unlike during the hours from ~ 1000 to 1500 hrs. The temperature of light is measured in degrees Kelvin. It would pay to learn about it as it's the crux of photography. A cloudy day, at noon, will give you about 5500 degrees K.

OK, I've got to hit the hay, it's late. If you want me too, I'll comment on the other shots.

Don't be scared of slowing your speeds down, it'll help your low light shots and give some 'movement' to some of your shots.

Once again, well done, you have a good eye.

Al
 

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Kathleen in AZ
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What's happening here? Looks like everyone is gathered around to watch one crazy guy ride his bike into a deep hole.
He was actually doing a pretty hard move to roll that back wall and not fall into the hole. There is a famous MTBR pic taken on an early AZ Spring Fling of a guy named Raymond missing the line and being propelled into the tank. Luckily for Scotty, he nailed the line :thumbsup:

Edit: I uploaded a GIF but it appears not to be animated. Will have to figure that out later.
 

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Kathleen in AZ
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi Durtgurl,

Just had a look at your shots. You have a good eye. If you're new to the photo gig you appear to have a natural flair for angle and composition, particularly if the composition in your shots are not achieved on PS.

If you don't mind, I'm going to critique your shots.....:thumbsup:

Al
I was hoping my shots would get some critique - thanks!! I have been doing point and shoot for years, but thought it was time to get back to my roots of when I used to shoot (and do my own printing) b&w with a 1959 Nikon rangefinder back in the early 90s.

To start off, my Dad loaned me his old Canon 10D. I've always loved the effect of fisheye, especially on biking shots, so I picked up the cheap 8mm. The top two shots that you critiqued were literally taken during my first time shooting with that lens and maybe my third time out with the 10D. The lens is completely manual so the overexposure was me trying to figure out what the heck to do while taking shots that I had very little time for prep. I found the 10D to be way too big for my somewhat arthritic hands and I wanted a bigger LCD, so off I went to Best Buy to pick up a new T3i with 2 kit lenses. But truth is, I'm stuck on fisheye right now which means I'm still in manual mode. I select the ISO for the situation, dial in the fstop and focus on the lens, then while in manual mode I can adjust the shutter speed by watching the light meter. I find that I use the LCD screen to do most of my shooting instead of looking thru the viewfinder.. easier on the old wrists, easier on the old eyes.

Only recently I figured out that I have burst mode on this camera - Ooo how fun!! I'm getting better (see Sedona pics), but there is still so much to learn. I'm guessing I need a remote or hot shoe flash when using the fisheye because the camera flash is shadowed by the permanent lens cover. The panning thing is new to me and I've been wanting to get practice at that... I just bought a nice Clik backpack so that I can carry the camera with me on rides. Now I just need to get out there and do it! I've always been told I have "the eye". In the past with my P&S images, I have used cropping heavily to fine tune the composition. My current goal with the fisheye is to do as little post-processing as possible. I'm a scientist and an engineer, so figuring this out is right up my alley. It's been a long time since I've been so excited about learning something new! Keep the suggestions coming!!
 

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What pack did you end up with? How do you like or dislike it? I got a D90 not too long ago and would like to start carrying it on some rides but haven't found a pack that I would feel comfortable carrying it in. I love the pics btw!
 

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Kathleen in AZ
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
First trip to Flagstaff in 2012. Shuttle season is upon us!



Getting better with manual settings of the Rokinon 8mm...



But give the camera to someone else and all bets are off... salvaging what I could out of this way over exposed photo produced an image that looks like I was riding in snow!



Looking forward to many more fun weekends this summer as we escape the Phx heat for the cool pines of Flagstaff.
 

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I have a rokinon 8mm as well, been using it for quite some time now and love it still
not sure how well you know about the focus dial on these. Many are out of alignment when shipped so when your focus ring says 10ft it'll actually be like 8 or 9. really easy to adjust.
But the best thing about this lens is you set it to f8 and infiniti focus and everything is in focus
 

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First trip to Flagstaff in 2012. Shuttle season is upon us!

Getting better with manual settings of the Rokinon 8mm...

But give the camera to someone else and all bets are off... salvaging what I could out of this way over exposed photo produced an image that looks like I was riding in snow!

Looking forward to many more fun weekends this summer as we escape the Phx heat for the cool pines of Flagstaff.
that second shot!!! unreal. perfect placement of rider, love it.

i shoot with a 6.5mm fish eye (which is great but only works in ideal circumstances) and recently rented a 10-22 which i loved! i'm looking into the tokina 11-16 to purchase as it's only $699
 
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