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old skool
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26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I needed to change the oil in my rear shock. It has been running fine on the original oil but I new it was over due so here ya go.

Start by cleaning the outside so you don't contaminate the inside.

Release the air pressure from the remote reservoir (there is no nitrogen).

Loosen the cap that retains the shaft. Remove the shaft/valve assembly. Dump the oil into a receptacle of your choice.

Loosen the cap to the remote reservoir. Using compressed air on the main housing will facilitate the removal of the floating piston in the remote reservoir. Then dump the rest of the oil.

This is where you start removing and replacing the seals. I just wanted to change the oil and I haven't ordered a rebuild kit yet. I only replaced one O-ring because I jacked it up during re-installation. I know I should have taken the opportunity for a complete rebuild but this thing is so easy to tear down I can always do it again.

After a complete wipe down and thorough cleaning I filled the remote reservoir with oil. I chose 10 wt. Mainly because that is what I had on hand. Fill it to the rim (it will spill over when the piston is installed).Install the piston so no air can be trapped under it.I layed the piston in at an angle and allowed the oil to spill.

Push the piston down just pass the threads of the reservoir body.

Next install the reservoir cap assembly. I turned the volume adjuster all the way in but don't add any air yet.

Next fill the main body full of oil. Slide the main shaft assembly into the main body.I cycled the shaft up and down a couple of times to get any air out of the main body. Then I slid the main body cap carefully down(Keep the inner O-ring away from the threads-This is the one I jacked up) It isn't hard, just pay better attention than me.

As you tighten the cap, oil will continue to spill over. Any air left in will also come aout. Before the cap is completely tight (3-4 threads visible) apply approx. 50 psi of air to the remote reservoir. This will get the rest if any air out of the oil side. The shaft may begin to rise. Tighten the cap the rest of the way. The outer O-ring should not be visible when tight.

Cycle the shock before installing the spring. Ensure your getting complete travel and have no dead spots. You may need to loosen up you dampening adjustments to cycle the shock by hand.

Re-Install the spring and return your settings to where you like them......go ride it
 

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noMAD man
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12,220 Posts
I bought one of those TheBrokenBike.com shim conversion kits for the 5th E a good while back. It did away with the SPV and provided an expanded shim stack to replace the OEM stuff. It was an easy mod, and the shock works extremely well. It's an 8.75 X 2.75 shock that was an experiment on my Gen 1 Nomad. I'd probably still be running it if it were an 8.5 X 2.5 version. The 5th E is a good shock, and the Avy conversion or even the simple conversion I did makes a great shock for bikes that don't need SPV.
 

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old skool
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26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have thought of doing that mod but I have always been really happy with the stock adjustments. When set up properly, it pedals like any other platform shock on the market yet it still rocks on the hard hits.
 
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