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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone. I am fairly new here and I have a small problem that I need your help with. You see I just bought a Procaliber 9.6 2020 model and I just found out that it has internal cabling but for the shifters only, the cabling for the brakes are outside and can be seen. Is there a way that i can also internally cable the brake wires so that it would look clean? I also noticed that the newer Procaliber 2021 models have internal cables for all wires. Thank you
 

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Hi, It is possible providing you have a spare cable port inlet and outlet to enable a decent cable run from the lever to the brake mount point without the hose interfering with moving parts i.e. cranks and chainring area?

Perhaps the ports for the rear shift cable could allow more than one cable to enter and exit through the same route?

I noticed on a pic there is an unused port on the right side of the top tube, maybe it's routing for a dropper post? It's possible you could use this depending where the dropper cable outlet is and finding a suitable route from there to the first external boss mount on the chainstay. From there your hose could run its normal external route to the caliper?
 

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since 4/10/2009
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Hello everyone. I am fairly new here and I have a small problem that I need your help with. You see I just bought a Procaliber 9.6 2020 model and I just found out that it has internal cabling but for the shifters only, the cabling for the brakes are outside and can be seen. Is there a way that i can also internally cable the brake wires so that it would look clean? I also noticed that the newer Procaliber 2021 models have internal cables for all wires. Thank you
Generally speaking, if the bike doesn't come with brake lines run internally, then they will always be external.

Also, be aware, that running cables internally is one thing, but internal hydraulics are another level of work because of the very thorough bleed they'll need once connected.
 

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Disgruntled Peccary
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Also, be aware, that running cables internally is one thing, but internal hydraulics are another level of work because of the very thorough bleed they'll need once connected.
I hate working on bikes with internal hydraulic lines.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi, It is possible providing you have a spare cable port inlet and outlet to enable a decent cable run from the lever to the brake mount point without the hose interfering with moving parts i.e. cranks and chainring area?

Perhaps the ports for the rear shift cable could allow more than one cable to enter and exit through the same route?

I noticed on a pic there is an unused port on the right side of the top tube, maybe it's routing for a dropper post? It's possible you could use this depending where the dropper cable outlet is and finding a suitable route from there to the first external boss mount on the chainstay. From there your hose could run its normal external route to the caliper?

Yeah i will definitely try to fit them directly to the rear shift cable slot if if can fit but if not then yes maybe i can also fit it on the other slot that may or may not be reserved for the dropper posf cables. I grately appreciate your response, hopefully I can have it done without drilling any new holes and given that the frame is carbon then it would also be a great risk.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Generally speaking, if the bike doesn't come with brake lines run internally, then they will always be external.

Also, be aware, that running cables internally is one thing, but internal hydraulics are another level of work because of the very thorough bleed they'll need once connected.
Yes that is also one of the things that is bothering me that maybe the cables are really meant for external. I just hope Trek would haved specified that the brake lines is external but on their page they just said intenal cabling but they forgot that it was just for the shifters.
 

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I agree it's misleading reading spec stating internal routing then finding out that your brake hose is external. ☹

As mentioned it's almost guaranteed to be a tricky and frustrating job routing internally. I'd say it'll be easier to disconnect hose from lever end, turn the bike upside down and thread upwards as the exit ports maybe wider at the top of the frame. This will help afterwards as any air will be at the lever end and help with the bleed process.

One method I've used is partially push in an insert hose connector with a tiny plug or piece of tape over the insert hole to try and stop fluid escaping. I then use string or fishing line tied to the insert, thread into frame then suck it out of the exit port with a vacuum cleaner nozzle and pull string/line to guide the hose out. This method has worked for me in the past. Whatever method you choose, good luck and possibly some patience will be required.😇 👍
 

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If you really want to make a 5 minute job into a 3 hour one, then, sure run your brake lines internal. What could possibly go wrong?
 

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Yes that is also one of the things that is bothering me that maybe the cables are really meant for external. I just hope Trek would haved specified that the brake lines is external but on their page they just said intenal cabling but they forgot that it was just for the shifters.
I agree it's misleading reading spec stating internal routing then finding out that your brake hose is external.
It's not misleading and Trek didn't forget anything. They used precise language. Hydraulic brake lines are not cables. They're hoses. If the spec list says "internal cables" then it means exactly that. Internal cable routing. Not internal brake hose routing.
 

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Community Manager at Trek
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Complete internal routing would be found on the 2021 models which were revised this year from the 2020 and older models.

But internal cable routing is accurate for your model - just not internal hose routing.
 

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It's not misleading to me nor did I say non factual and I personally am fully aware of the difference but a novice looking for their first bike who might not even know the difference or even being aware that hydraulic hoses or brakes exist than I'd say it misleading in a legal, factual way.

We all have to start somewhere and learn these facts and maybe the OP wasn't aware, if so I'm sure he/she will never 'feel' misled in future.
 

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We all have to start somewhere and learn these facts and maybe the OP wasn't aware, if so I'm sure he/she will never 'feel' misled in future.
A good start is to start using language more precisely, and to realize that companies with large(ish) marketing departments are going to use language precisely. It does wonders to prevent unrealistic expectations (which is really what you're talking about).
 

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Not quite sure why are you quoting me and giving me a lesson in marketing @Harold? Not my issue in the slightest and couldn't care less tbh. Maybe you meant to explain the facts directly to the OP?

I'm just answering a question on a forum and expressing an opinion.

I do meticulous research before a purchase and have never misread, misunderstood or been misled by any bike related terms or descriptions. I know exactly what I'm getting before I get it, i.e. (realistic expectations) based on precise language I fully understand.
 
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