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The original "AS" of MTBR
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Rode my 6.6 last week and noticed there was some play in the pivots, around the swing link (I think that's what it's called). Anyway, I realized all 4 bolts had come loose, tightened them and solved the problem (or so I thought). Yesterday, mid-way into a nasty 4hr ride, not only were all the bolts coming loose again but the rear had developed almost 1/4 of play. No matter how tight I tried to screw them in, all 4 bolts kept loosening up on me and the rear had that play.

Anyone else have this problem? What should I check for / try to fix myself before I send the frame back?

Thanks in advance.

-A
 

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Now with flavor!!
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5,613 Posts
I think everyone has that problem. Everyone who doesn't use locktite at least.

Give it a go. It should hold them in place. Blue seems to work for me both on my 6.6 and my uzzi.
 

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Old school BMXer
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2,695 Posts
Did you clean the threads before using the Loctite? Also, the Loctite takes a day or so to dry. I've never had problems with any of the hardware coming loose on either my VPX or 5.5.
 

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The original "AS" of MTBR
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41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Y'know, while I'm at it....
I'm coming off a few years of Horst linked bikes and I gotta say that I am really getting turned off by the VPP system on the larger travel models. Beside the rear end always wanting to come loose, there is way too much pedal kickback in the granny ring for me. Does anyone else (especially those of you riding flats) feel the same? I'm starting to feel that the pedaling efficiancy is being out-weighed by the negative feel at the pedals. Ever try to stand and muscle over rocks when your in a low gear? Ugh!
 

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Now with flavor!!
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Well the pivot bolts are an easy fix. I doubt red locktite will fail you. I ran out of blue once and used it on my uzzi and it still lets you get the bolts out without too much stress.

As far as pedal kickback: this is something where I'm sure I'm in the minority but I set both my vpp bikes based on finding the sweet spot from feel, not from recommended sag. When you're outside this range, you definitely get some weird pedal charactaristics. That said, your sag position while flat is different than when you're climbing up something steep since more of your weight is rearward so it's important to find that balance.

I can say this......my uzzi is easier to setup than my 6.6. Even once I got the 6.6 dialed, I still felt some pedal sensations that just weren't there on my specialized bikes of the past. It's not a bad thing because the bike stays much more level than my old bikes on the steep climbs and it actually accelerates better over rough sections........but it still doesn't feel like the spec bikes. I don't consider it a bad thing, just different. Specialized bikes in particular have a tendency to squat without a bunch of pedal platform damping...these bikes don't. That to me is worth the difference.
 

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The original "AS" of MTBR
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
kidwoo said:
That said, your sag position while flat is different than when you're climbing up something steep since more of your weight is rearward so it's important to find that balance.
When I say "flats" I mean, uncliped, flat shoes. Clipped in, the feedback isn't so bad but when I wear flats, my feet get knocked off constantly.:madman:

And I really wanted to love my 6.6 like I did my old Uzzi SL. :cryin:
 

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Old school BMXer
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kidwoo said:
As far as pedal kickback: this is something where I'm sure I'm in the minority but I set both my vpp bikes based on finding the sweet spot from feel, not from recommended sag. When you're outside this range, you definitely get some weird pedal charactaristics. That said, your sag position while flat is different than when you're climbing up something steep since more of your weight is rearward so it's important to find that balance.
I'm with kidwoo on this too. I've never actually measured for sag - just by feel, and then I learn my ideal position.

Since I started riding a singlespeed before riding VPP bikes, I'm used to attacking things standing in a taller gear. This approach often makes quick work out of obstacles, and I don't have to worry about so many pedal strokes and the risk of the cranks or pedals hitting the obstacle.

I mix it up a bit, and I ride with either clipins or flats on both my 5.5 and VPX.

Yes, my four-bar SLX was slightly more plush on the technical climbs, but because of the suspension design, the bike wasn't very responsive when I had to quickly crank a few pedals strokes over an obstacle. I'll take that any day over a little kickback. Note that you'd really only feel kickback if you're "soft pedalling." When you're really cranking it, your strength should easily overcome the little bit of kickback. I guess it depends if you really ride with conviction or just lollygagging around.
 

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Now with flavor!!
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AS.. the original said:
When I say "flats" I mean, uncliped, flat shoes.
Right. When I said flat, I meant riding on level ground vs. climbing. Clipped in or not, your riding position isn't that different (if at all). What I meant was was your sag position varies on most bikes with the degree of angle you're riding on.

I haven't ridden my 6.6 with flats but I have climbed on my uzzi with them. There's no difference. Like I said before, it sounds like you're out of the sweet spot sag zone.
 
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