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melon farmer
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone else noticed marks on the inner surface (where the shock bolt passes thru) of the reducers from the shaft eye of their rear shock?

I've just pulled my Fox Float out of my '03 Enduro to swap shocks and noticed that there are thread marks on the inside surface of the reducers where it looks as though the threads on the rear eyelet bolt have been in contact with the reducer...

I was thinking it was either from a very hard landing with not enough air pressure (I run 200 - 220psi and weigh around 210lbs) OR just a normal wear pattern after 12 months of use in very dry conditions. As several people have mentioned in other threads, they are made of soft aluminium, so I guess they are meant to wear out eventually.

Any thoughts? Thanks...
 

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Gravity Rides Everything
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1,126 Posts
those aluminum reducers are JUNK. The absolute weakest link in the enduro suspension.

www.betd.co.uk get a "strong shock bushing" from them. it's stainless steel and goes all the way through the eyelet instead of going in from both sides. very rigid and long lasting.
 

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Try 2004 Enduro reducer set up

Some 2004 Enduros came with solid stainless sleeve (as mentioned above) with aluminum
spacers both sides. The stainless sleeve ID fits rear shock bolt, OD fits DU bushing
in shock. Aluminum spacers just position shock side to side. Call Fox, they might
have them, I've bought reducers from them before. Yes, the all aluminum reducers
on Enduros wear out very quickly, (mainly the rear one) get the stainless if you can.
 

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mountain biker
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535 Posts
yes, that is normal wear...

There is nothing in between the bolt and the reducers, so as the shock moves around the bolt, it carves its pattern into the reducers. DON'T EVER THE LET REDUCERS GET SO WORN THAT THERE IS PLAY BETWEEN THEM AND THE BOLT. This leads to broken bolts and weakened links.

You can get those reducers from Fox for fairly cheap. The most important bit to replace (regularly) is the bushing that sits between the reducers and the shock eye. It's a tight press fit, but you can get it out with ratchet sockets and a vise (search this forum there are step by step instructions for this process). Those bushings can be had from just about any bushing shop.

They're key because once they start wearing out, they cause the other parts to wear out exponentially faster. You want that whole shock eye/bushing/reducer/bolt interface to be tight, with no play.

I used to break bolts regularly, and since I've begun maintaining that area nice and tight, I've had no problems...

Good luck and happy trails.
 

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Gravity Rides Everything
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slyfink said:
There is nothing in between the bolt and the reducers, so as the shock moves around the bolt, it carves its pattern into the reducers. DON'T EVER THE LET REDUCERS GET SO WORN THAT THERE IS PLAY BETWEEN THEM AND THE BOLT. This leads to broken bolts and weakened links.
that's some good advice right there. allowing any suspension parts to wear until there is any play is bad news. you'll be wrecking shocks, links and frame parts :eek: $$$$$

yeah replace worn stuff.

I know having to maintain your full suspension bike sucks, but it's cheaper than new knees/vertebrae. Be glad the bike is taking that abuse for your body ;)
 

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melon farmer
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Update on the issue... and more questions.

slyfink said:
There is nothing in between the bolt and the reducers, so as the shock moves around the bolt, it carves its pattern into the reducers. DON'T EVER THE LET REDUCERS GET SO WORN THAT THERE IS PLAY BETWEEN THEM AND THE BOLT. This leads to broken bolts and weakened links.
Thanks - the shock is brand new and so has brand new bushes - the reducers didn't appear to have ANY play between them and the bush, which causes the majority of rear sus knocking sounds. I noticed all this when replacing the Float ITch (whose bushes were a little worn but not enough to cause slop) with a Float AVA...

My concern is now I hear a tiny knock at the start of the shock travel - could this noise be a sign of wear on the ID of the reducer (ie - bolt and reducer banging together)? Has anyone had this problem before? Or it could be the ProPedal valving - I have heard they can make weird noises?

Maybe the alu reducers simply DO need replacing?? Any suggestions? Maybe the best plan is to get the BETD stainless bushes as suggested previously on this post. And to check to see that the bolt isn't bent.. are the bolts easy enough to come by?

Thanks and sorry for rabbitting on... I tend to worry about these things a lot as I don't want to cause any major probs.
 

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mountain biker
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535 Posts
I'd say your best bet is to do it all...

change the bushing, the reducers and the bolt, and see what happens. If it doesn't fix your noise, then at least you'll know what it wasn't. Plus it can't hurt to replace those parts, and shouldn't cost much more than $30. Get the bushings from a local bushing shop, they'll be better than the Fox one's; mine are teflon coated, plus they'll be cheaper. You'll have to get the bushings from Fox. You can get the stainless steel single sleeve bushing if you want, but I seem to remember reading on this forum that it just displaces the problem (ie to the upper shock eye). Finally, the bolt will have to be ordered from Specialized. Your shop should be able to order the bushings and bolt for you.

Good luck...
 

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i replaced the (obviously) bent bolt on my 03 stumpjumper fsr with an $0.80 high tensile steel one from a lock nuts and bolts shop (the lbs guys told me to get one from there, not bother getting it from big S). also, u'll find that u can get a bolt with a longer shank (the non-threaded bit) so that u don't get any thread inside the reducers (or only a small bit at least) - u might just have to cut the length of the bolt though.

after installing a new bushing, the alloy reducers should be tight fit into the eyelet (ie use a bench vice), so if this is still the case then u shoudln't need new reducers - at least this is what the lbs told me. obviously if there's still slop in the suspension then maybe the inside diameter of the reducers has worn and u'll need new ones
 

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Caution Will Robinson !

FYI
Specialized will void your warranty if they know you did any work on your bike! This bolt is not factory authorised and thus you have voided your warranty.

ok well having said that....

The OEM bolts are nearly the lowest quality available if not the lowest. Look for FASTENAL part number 39575 or 39576. These are black hex head bolts. The first is nearly exact shank length to OEM . The 39576 has a 5.5 mm longer unthreaded shank portion which I believe will fit. I have both these cut down to approx 47mm and are in my tool box as spares. You will need washers which should be easy to find. Your exact lent will vary based on your choice of washers and bolt. If you have the twitch switch you may need to flip the bolt so it doent interfere, or simply remove the little itch lever.

REMEMBER -

1. The cut length of the bolt is depenent on the width of the washers you plan on using so the 47mm length is approximate.

2. Shank lengths are 34.5mm for the 39575 and 40mm for the 39576. You could buy these bolts for under 2 dollars, get the washers and bolt you plan to use then verify which shank lengths will fit - ie is the 39576 shank too long preventing proper tightening of the nut?

3. This will cost you a few dollars and I bet you lunch that if you don't wrench the nuts on too tight these should work perfectly. Keep the orig bolt cause if you own an Enduro and ride hard you will have to use your warranty!

Good Luck From Denver
Chuck Springs
 

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mountain biker
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CSPRINGS said:
FYI

The OEM bolts are nearly the lowest quality available if not the lowest.
I'm going to have to respectfully disagree on this one. You'll notice on your bolt, close to the head (or in it, I can't quite remember) that there's a little number. That numer (I think 1 through 10) indicates the strength of the bolt. The higher the number, the greater the strength. I went to a specialty bolt and fastener shop here in town with my specialized bolt to see if I could get one from them for cheaper. They looked at it and said that the Specialized bolt is of the highest quality available, and getting the same quality would cost me more through them than through Specialized.

You'll also want to note that those black bolts are not stainless steel. Think about that for a minute.... I've used some as a stop gap measure while waiting on specialized's bolt to come in, and they generally didn't last a ride... which means undue stress on the link, which led to the link to fail eventually... not fun.

Of course, the black bolts I used could have been of different quality to the ones mentionned above, but my experience leads me to suggest you stick to the specialized bolts....

Good luck... and happy trails!
 
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