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This truly does not make any sense to me, so I am hoping that someone out there has dealt with this. I have a pair of new Hope M4 Monos, and I have been riding with them for the last month or so. I have loved them, compared to my Avid Mechs and my older Hope Minis. But yesterday I started having problems. After changing out a pinch flat, my rear brake was all jacked. Here are the symptoms:

When the bike is not moving, I grab the brake lever and everything feels good. But as soon as I started in motion, when applying my rear brake, the lever would go to the handlebar in about half a second. I would stop, and pump the lever once or twice, and all would be good as long as I wasn't moving. So tonight, I took it a step further, and found that 100% of the time when I am not moving, the brake responds correctly. But if I am just pushing the bike at 2 MPH, the lever goes to the bar and I have no braking force 100% of the time. The strangest part is that when I initially grab the lever when I am not moving, and continue to hold the lever while pushing the bike forward, the lever slowly pulls to the bar, proportional to the speed I push my bike. When I do that, it feels like the pressure inside the brake system is being released. But there is no brake fluid leaks. And I re-bled the system again tonight, and the exact same events occur. Does anyone have any ideas? I will probably end up sending them back to Hope for warranty, does anyone have any experience dealing with Hope?

Thanks for any info,
BullSCit
 

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Strange... try a reverse bleed

I have a set of the old style Minis so I have some anecdotal experience, but not exactly like the one you've described. My first response is it sounds to me like you have air in the system still. When I first got my brakes I had to shorten both hoses and it took me several attempts to get a proper bleed and remove all air out of the system. I was ultimately successful with help from this board. If I were you, I would try yet another bleed.

If you can't easily remove the brake for a re-bleed, make sure that your bike is positioned vertically, front tire in the air, so air bubbles can't get trapped in the all the curves and dips that are usually associated with rear brake hose routing. First, open up the master cylinder cap (check and make sure you have no holes in the rubber diaphragm) and tap up and down the line and tap the caliper for several minutes to dislodge any possible air bubbles. After you've done that awhile, this time try a reverse bleed on the brake. Get a hold a friend (easier with two people) and a large syringe attached to some clear hose and force brake fluid through the bleed valve at the caliper. Be careful because the excess fluid will spill out of the open the master cylinder so be ready with the rags. Made sure you have absolutely no air in the syringe before you open the bleed valve and force fluid in. Once you think you've run enough fluid through the brake, tap the caliper and lines again then top off the master cylinder. Let the bike sit for a couple of hours and then close up master cylinder and you're done.

If this is not successful try the standard bleeding technique one last time and if that is unsuccessful again you might have a malfunctioning lever and it's time to call Hope.

Good luck,

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