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Hi I bought tool for chain wear measurement like this: Grey Drawing Tail

When I put tool on some links it indicates that chain is NOT worn but when I put it on the others it indicates that chain IS worn. For the major number of chain links it indicate that chain is good. What is conclusion? Is chain worn or not?
 

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Don't know what could be going on with your chain, don't use or trust those chain checkers, just grab yourself a good steel ruler, 24" preferably and measure from pin to pin, if it doesn't hit bang on 12" or 24", then your chain is stretched. When to change, for me when I see anything over 1/16" over 24".
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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IME, 1/16th is in the "replace soon zone" for a 12" chain section, not 24. I'm not sure how you are getting 24" though, I don't even have 24" of my chain exposed on the underside (long side) of my drivetrain.

When I worked in a shop, we always used the ruler method, because it was quick, reliable, easy, etc.

Here's an authoritative article on it from Sheldon Brown:

Measuring Chain Wear
The standard way to measure chain wear is with a ruler or steel tape measure. This can be done without removing the chain from the bicycle. The normal technique is to measure a one-foot length, placing an inch mark of the ruler at the side of one link pin, then looking at the corresponding link pin 12 complete links away. On a new, unworn chain, this link pin will also line up exactly with an inch mark. With a worn chain, the link pin will be past the inch mark. For accurate measurement, the chain should be held under some tension -- either on the bicycle, or hanging. Also, use a metal ruler or tape measure. Wood, plastic and cloth all can expand or shrink. Measurement is also possible with a metric ruler -- see below.

This technique gives a direct measurement of the wear to the chain, and an indirect measurement of the wear to the sprockets. first, let's look at how to do this with a ruler that measures in inches.

If the link pin is less than 1/16" past the mark, all is well.
If the link pin is 1/16" past the mark, you should replace the chain, but the sprockets are probably undamaged.
If the link pin is 1/8" past the mark, you have left it too long, and the sprockets (at least the favorite ones) will be too badly worn. If you replace a chain at the 1/8" point, without replacing the sprockets, it may run OK and not skip, but the worn sprockets will cause the new chain to wear much faster than it should, until it catches up with the wear state of the sprockets.
If the link pin is past the 1/8" mark, a new chain will almost certainly skip on the worn sprockets, especially the smaller ones.
In metric measurement, 10 links of a new chain are 25.4 cm, or 15 links, 38.1 cm.

If the link pin is up to 25.5 cm or halfway between 38.2 cm and 38.3 cm, all is well.
If the link pin is a little bit past 25.5 cm, or approaching 38.3 cm, you should replace the chain, but the sprockets are probably undamaged.
If the link pin is approaching 25.7 cm or 38.5 cm, you have left it too long, and the sprockets (at least the favorite ones) will be too badly worn. If you replace a chain at this point, without replacing the sprockets, it may run OK and not skip, but the worn sprockets will cause the new chain to wear much faster than it should, until it catches up with the wear state of the sprockets.
More than that, and a new chain will almost certainly skip on the worn sprockets, especially the smaller ones.
There are also special tools made to measure chain wear; these are a bit more convenient, though by no means necessary, and most -- except for the Shimano TL-CN40 and TL-CN41 -- are inaccurate because they allow roller play to confound the measurement of link-pin wear.
 

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You can get more elongation on the quick link, I have seen on my previous chains quick link not in measuring area=Good Measure, quick link with measuring area= shows elongation

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
 

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Would agree that 1/16" isn't quite ready to be replaced, but it's stretched a bit, so if you have loaner bikes, you can pass it on to one of them and put a new chain on yours, if one of your loaners needed a new chain say. As to how do I even manage to measure 24", well, I use the KMC 10spd quick link and just remove the chain, normally do this if I see stretch measuring 12". How I change chains, my other drivetrain parts last me years.

IME, 1/16th is in the "replace soon zone" for a 12" chain section, not 24. I'm not sure how you are getting 24" though, I don't even have 24" of my chain exposed on the underside (long side) of my drivetrain.

When I worked in a shop, we always used the ruler method, because it was quick, reliable, easy, etc.

Here's an authoritative article on it from Sheldon Brown:
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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I use the KMC 10spd quick link and just remove the chain, normally do this if I see stretch measuring 12". How I change chains, my other drivetrain parts last me years.
Ahh. I like doing it with the chain attached because it's naturally under tension, so IMO it's harder to mess up, but if you are taking it off, you can definitely measure it at the same time. Same here with the other parts lasting years. With old XT 10spd cassettes I couldn't get more than a year usually. With the bigger X01 and XTR, I'm getting several years, heck, haven't had to junk one yet.
 

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I only just moved to 10spd about 3 years ago to get the clutch feature, only run XT on my personal bikes, always have, best bang for buck, IMHO, never had an issue with anything lasting, but I'm honestly not putting in the miles I once used to. Only thing that surprised me with Shimano is when I got their brakes, learned that resin pads don't last much more than 700 miles riding in a variety of conditions :D

Ahh. I like doing it with the chain attached because it's naturally under tension, so IMO it's harder to mess up, but if you are taking it off, you can definitely measure it at the same time. Same here with the other parts lasting years. With old XT 10spd cassettes I couldn't get more than a year usually. With the bigger X01 and XTR, I'm getting several years, heck, haven't had to junk one yet.
 
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