Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,910 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I put together a multi part post on the Morris plan. The Permalink for the index is here:
http://ashwinearl.blogspot.com/2005/11/off-season-training-index-and.html

---------------------------------------
Here is the index for all the Off Season Training posts:

Part 1: Intro
Part 2 Macro View
Part 3: Strength Training
Part 3b: How to do intervals
Part 4: Aerobic Endurance +
Part 5: Recovery Weeks
Part 6: SMSP Intervals
Part 7: MSP Intervals
Off season appendix: MTBDOC cut/pastes from mtbr forums

Ok and what comes after the MSP: I guess you'd call it In Season training. You gotta take some time to get the riding legs under you and get some of that snap back. Sprints, leadout intervals do that.

And now is the time to do some hard riding. Just like races. Dave prescribes lots of training races and also lots of rest. The book provides some examples of 'in season' training for different types of events like road racing, mountain bike racing, time trialing etc.

I'll probably do at least 1 ride still on the trainer. Lots of 2-3hr hard mountain bike rides, hard road rides, and also plenty of easy rides and days off.

But the basics premise is training specificity. If you race mtn bikes well then you gotta train like that. My biggest downfall has been not doing hard group rides or those hard club road rides that just drive you into the ground, and I hope to change that this year.

I don't have the time to just go out and go to a real race every weekend unfortunately as there is no better training than racing.

Also there are those intervals like 3 on, 1.5 off. basically where you DO NOT give yourself the proper recovery before doing the next interval. Cause that is exactly what a mountain bike race is like.

So I guess it's pretty obvious that I like this training program. I've been on it now going into my 3rd year. I'm getting better each year, and I am able to improve, ride at a decent level competitively in my class, and maintain some balance in my life keeping family first.

I like the block concept, as I am a single minded individual even to a fault. And with the blocks I can concentrate on one thing at a time and then move it. It helps to focus me and I like the anticipation for the next block, and like watching the transformation that occurs during each block.

Each phase builds upon the last it it is such a rush to one day be on that ride where it just comes together and you are flying on a different level.

Yes, it is TRAINING. It isn't just go out and ride for fun. But honestly, I am having the time of my life right now. Cause there is NOTHING as much fun as riding strong and fast. Sure I do miss the 'mountain bike lifestyle' of epic rides,and epic dinners afterwards. But things change. And I'm just happy that I am able to ride at this level at my age, and my current place in life. That is fun.

I had a banner year last year, and the biggest breakthrough was understanding that I am pacing myself in races all wrong. I get so worked up about pushing myself as hard as I can and trying to stay with the lead pack that I blow up way too soon. Next year I am going to just let the leaders go and try to ride harder into the second half of the race.

Sure I might never catch the front runners but they are sandbaggers anyway! But I have feeling if I race smarter that I'll be getting some really good finishes and breaking personal records.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
639 Posts
ashwhine,
what do you see as the major differences between the morris program and friel's? i am only familiar w/ friel's. i need something new and what you are saying sounds like something i can use. i do get to do epics and ride a lot but i have lost all my riding partners durring the week due to capitalism. so i could implement a lot off structure in my morning rides alone. i have had good results in the past but i think i am getting old(er) and my haphazard approach to training needs to be revamped. thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,910 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
butryon said:
ashwhine,
what do you see as the major differences between the morris program and friel's? i am only familiar w/ friel's. i need something new and what you are saying sounds like something i can use. i do get to do epics and ride a lot but i have lost all my riding partners durring the week due to capitalism. so i could implement a lot off structure in my morning rides alone. i have had good results in the past but i think i am getting old(er) and my haphazard approach to training needs to be revamped. thanks
First let me say that following ANY periodized plan consitently is going to provide results. Part of the key to my success with the Morris plan is just the plain fact that I've stuck with it.

I tried Friel several years ago and hardly made it a month or two into the program. I just got so bogged down in the different types of rides he had listed and the minute details of the plan in the book. It just didn't work with how I operate. One thing I like about the Morris plan is it is fairly simple. And the block philosophy works well. Focus for a little while, take a break, focus, take a break, do one type of workout for a while, rest, do another type, etc.

I am not sure about Friel's current philosophy but back then his plan called for a fair amount of base work. And Morris's philosphy calls for much less especially wrt to mtn bike racing at the Sport level. Morris also includes some sprinting during the aerobic phase to not lose the strength developed in the weight room.

I LOVE the Morris strength training program. The addition of block training with the weights really works.

Just implementing riding in a block fashion is going to provide improvement if you're stagnating.

Something like
3 days on, 2off, 2on 1 off. Where you ride at high intensities, but each successive day you cut down the duration. And then take a rest week every 3 weeks.

Just try that out and see if you like it. If so, check out his book and try it out. But following the book requires a lot of thought to set the program up for your individual requirements.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,929 Posts
Great job! Including mtbdoc's tips is an especially nice touch. I believe I'm going to try Morris but in a modified (read: shortened) way. I think I still have your spreadsheet.

This past year elevated my fitness 10 fold by doing road rides but I really didn't do anything structured, basically I just hammered whenever I rode. Of course that's the equivalent of doing intervals which, imho, is the best bang for the buck if you're limited on time.

I've read both Morris and Friel about 2 years ago but I was strictly mt bike back then. I believe I'd find it easier now that I can grab my road bike and head out of the driveway for workouts rather than having to drive to a trail.

Lou.
 

·
Not Smart Enough to Quit
Joined
·
644 Posts
All hail the Morris Guru!

Last spring I started reading the posts from aswin and MTBdoc and it really changed my training. I bought the Morris book, and though it is quite vauge, i tried to follow the plan. I was too late for the weights, but the Intervals helped a bunch.

I think the place I went wrong last year was on the group rides you talked about. I was working a night shift so all of my weekday rides were solo. Not so this year! I'll be able to hit the local "Wednesday Night Worlds" rides and some MTB TT rides as well.

I'm currently into the adaption phase of my weights and I've been lifting twice a week and SSing twice, with some road and fixed gear thrown in also. I was going to skip the big weight cycles, but you might have talked me into it now.

I have a quick note on power measuring. I have a regular mag trainer and I was not going to be able to upgrade for a while, so I was at a loss as to how to measure power. Then I figured that x watts equals y speed, so if I measure my speed and all other conditions stay the same (trainer resistance, tire pressure, etc.) my speed would reflect power output. I mean, it's just a number right? Like watts or joules, mph or kph or mps. If I'm doing my intervals at 25 mph today and 26 mph tomorrow, then I am generating more watts, correct? A simple rear wheel pickup for my computer is all it took to give me a power measuring device. If my thoughts on this are incorrect, please let me know!

BTW, how much riding do you do during each strength phase? Here in the south, I am able to ride road and trail nearly year round. How much is too much?

Thanks for your input. You don't mind if I call you coach, do you?

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,910 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
xray_ed said:
Last spring I started reading the posts from aswin and MTBdoc and it really changed my training. I bought the Morris book, and though it is quite vauge, i tried to follow the plan. I was too late for the weights, but the Intervals helped a bunch.

I think the place I went wrong last year was on the group rides you talked about. I was working a night shift so all of my weekday rides were solo. Not so this year! I'll be able to hit the local "Wednesday Night Worlds" rides and some MTB TT rides as well.

I'm currently into the adaption phase of my weights and I've been lifting twice a week and SSing twice, with some road and fixed gear thrown in also. I was going to skip the big weight cycles, but you might have talked me into it now.

I have a quick note on power measuring. I have a regular mag trainer and I was not going to be able to upgrade for a while, so I was at a loss as to how to measure power. Then I figured that x watts equals y speed, so if I measure my speed and all other conditions stay the same (trainer resistance, tire pressure, etc.) my speed would reflect power output. I mean, it's just a number right? Like watts or joules, mph or kph or mps. If I'm doing my intervals at 25 mph today and 26 mph tomorrow, then I am generating more watts, correct? A simple rear wheel pickup for my computer is all it took to give me a power measuring device. If my thoughts on this are incorrect, please let me know!

BTW, how much riding do you do during each strength phase? Here in the south, I am able to ride road and trail nearly year round. How much is too much?

Thanks for your input. You don't mind if I call you coach, do you?

Ed
I said it b4 and I'll say it again. I'm no coach, and I didn't even stay in a Holiday Inn last night. These are just my ramblings.

-Yes the book is vague. But the template and basic fundamentals of his program are presented, and the hard part is tweaking it for each individual. Getting some coaching from him for several months helped me a ton to get an inkling on how to take the fundamental template and tailor it more specific to my body, my life, and my events.

-Be careful about actually doing 'real' rides during the hypertrophy phase. This phase destroys your legs, and you need to recover. Just spining around is recovery but 'real' riding is not, and mentally it brings me down cause I'm just not going to be riding very well in this phase. This is compounded if you ride w/other people who are not on a periodized plan

-During the strength and power phases last year I did endurance rides on the non lifting days. 2-3hrs if I could but the weather really shut me down. Finding out how much is too much is part of the 'black art' and where an experienced coach can help.

-You're right about the intervals on the mag trainer. A set velocity/cadence = set power. The actual # is meaningless to anyone but yourself. The number from my Tacx ergo is meaningless until it gets calibrated against a power tap or SRM. The key is to find that velocity/cadence that you can hold for the entire interval session. Record it as best you can so you can track improvement or if you need a rest. Check with the manufacturer and do some searches online as I recall seeing some graphs with power curves from several major trainer manufacturers. The thing about a true ergo trainer like a computrainer or Tacx is the set/forget feature where the power holds regardless of cadence or gearing. Mentally this is easier for me to do an interval than having to watch cadence/velocity.

-Personally I think the weights are the second most important part of his training plan, with the first being the SMSP intervals. The thing with the strength training is that it isn't until several months into the season that I really get the true benefit from them. There is lots of debate wrt to strength training in the gym vs doing it all on the bike. Morris does do on-bike work in the form of sprints, leadouts and Muscle Endurance work, but only after the hypertrophy/strength/power phases in the weight room. I do really believe in the correlation between muscle fiber size and strength that eventually leads to higher power, and just don't see how you can time effectively do it all on the bike. But that's my opinion and I'm just a hack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Nice effort! Glad someone has picked up my slack...

I've checked out your blog, and appreciate your efforts. Organizing this stuff is very helpful for folks. If I actually had all of the posts I'd ever written on this forum [and the previous version] I'd attach them. But, some of you have archived that stuff, so it provides a help to the community.

Basically what I have communicated over the past is a summary of being coached by DaveM from '97-'02, >100hrs of phone conversations with him [for real! ask my wife...], much reading on my own, and experience from others I have coached. Dave has taken sound physiologic principles and applied them. In my opinion, Friel has always just written down the 'prevailing wisdom' without that much sound, scientific basis for what he says. As an example, for years he preached weight training with 30-50 rep exercises. Now, he has changed his tune. There really was no good research basis for the high rep stuff, just his own intuition and a reluctance to use weights for what they are best for.

Dave has done so much for training by ignoring prevailing wisdom, and putting real research data to use. Power based training has been available for a LONG time. As I just posted elsewhere, I bought my first Computrainer >10 yrs ago. Dave was the importer for SRM before anyone even knew what they were.

Anyway, I am rambling. Happens when you get old...just put me back in my chair, and wipe the dribble from my chin!

At least I'm past the worst of the sore thighs/butt from squats and leg presses. I also add some hack squats which really load the quads [and, when I bought my leg press sled, the hack squat parts came with it!]. Each year, I notice that it takes longer for the body to adapt to the weight work. More tendon issues. And despite continuing upperbody weights after my achilles injury this year [when I couldn't ride, I decided to try to stay a stronger and not have the usual 12" cyclist arms!], I have sore shoulders...ah...48 yrs old...no one said this aging stuff was easy!

Another random thought: I've looked at a couple of threads and there is some discussion about highly structured training vs. just riding. That is a REALLY tough call. If racing is a real priority for you [planning 10 or more events, really WANT to excel and find your own personal limits, etc] then by all means: get structured and consider a coach. Eventually I've gotten to the point where there are too many time conflicts, and I've gotten tired of all of the effort and travel for a 2hr race. So...not sure. But, I did do it for years. Got fast. Got way faster than I should have. Consistent podium fast. Winning $$ fast. High nat'l ranking fast. But it was a sacrifice.

Will I get back there again? Don't know. Part of me keeps thinking about 2007 when I turn 50. But, here's the rub: one season of structured training won't get you to your best. I continued to improve from 40 => 41 => 42 => 43 => 44 y/o. Amazing. But hard...and each year builds on the previous year. It was in my 3rd year of this work that I really started to go "over the top"...and that was after a few years of self directed training.

ashwinearl, you have done many cyclists a great service. KEEP IT UP!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,910 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Big shoes to fill

MTBDOC said:
I've checked out your blog, and appreciate your efforts. Organizing this stuff is very helpful for folks. If I actually had all of the posts I'd ever written on this forum
ashwinearl, you have done many cyclists a great service. KEEP IT UP!
Thanks Doc. You were the one who started it all: here is a post of mine that you replied to in May of 1999. I've had it saved on my computer since then:
----------------------------------------------------------

Home Page
-- Select -- Product Reviews Trail Reviews Marketplace Techtalk Passion Hotlinks What's New Dream Bike Spotlight One on One Hot News MTBR Files Company Guide Events Chat Store --------------- Outdoor Review Golf Review PCPhoto Review Audio Review PC Game Review Computer Review --------------- Consumer Review

The Marquis de Dave (or is it Sade?)

Click here and support our site by visiting our sponsor.

[ Follow Ups ] [ Post Followup ] [ MTBR Techtalk ] [ FAQ ]

Posted by MTBDOC on May 27, 1999 at 12:59:53:
In Reply to: Block Training (3 HARD Days followed by easy days) posted by Ash on May 25, 1999 at 07:43:44:

As I have previously posted, Dave Morris and Dean Golich are both proponents of doing focused training blocks. I hired Dave as a coach in Nov 97 and have tried very hard to follow the program he has designed for me. It involves lots of racing and lots of race-like training. Also I have a lot of recovery days. He will frequently prescribe 2d hard, 1d off, 3d hard, 2d off. The other thing that he advocates is doing many similar workouts over a 3-4 wk block. For example, I might do 6 x 6 min zone 5 intervals on day one, then 6 x 3 or 4 min the next day at the same power level. Then a day off, then 7 x 6 min, 8 x 3min, rest, etc.

In the article in MBA he prescribed "VO2 max" intervals of 2-6 min duration over the first month, then slightly lower output "LT" intervals of 8-15 min in the second month. The power output is generally held constant over the month, with longer intervals, more repeats, more total minutes of work. To establish the power output, I simply estimate the load I can complete, and after 3 yrs on a computrainer, I have a pretty good idea. Occasionally I will increase the power and attempt to complete THE ENTIRE WORKOUT at that level. There are occasionals when he has prescribed a constant volume of work over the specific block and my goal is to increase power level as often as possible.

Give him a yell via email. It is well worth the $ to hire a talented coach. I know a lot of exercise physiology and self coached with good progress for years. However I give him a lot of credit for guiding my training over the past 18 months. email: [email protected] (as in "sports science one")
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Hypertrophy

Hey Bro and Hey MTBDOC,

In my hypertrophy phase, just started. I maxed out plugged into the spreadsheet and headed to the gym. I could not complete the # of reps as listed at the certain percentages. I did on the first 3 sets but after that I was only getting to like 6 or 7 reps. Should I lower the weight and get the reps, or keep the weight and just keep doing what I can. Which is the most important??

by the way, I did a race at the end of my prep phase and smoked the class by like 4.5 minutes on a very hilly course. I really think the weights helped but more than anything I think the lower back and ab worked really had a factor in me feeling so strong on the climbs. Thanks BK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
To produce the desired hypertrophy of the fibers, it is the VOLUME of work that is important. The %'s are simply a guide/starting point. So: lower the weight to get your reps up a bit.

The key to this type of training is to do EVERYTHING at the maximal level that you can complete. Get your 6 sets, 10-12 reps. Be tired. Get stronger. Race faster.
 

·
Metalheadbikerider
Joined
·
2,904 Posts
Nice work Ash!

I'm in my 3rd year (or is it 4th??) of using the Morris plan and I've had similar great results. Last year I only did one race in Expert, and then kept training without racing. Finishing up a Master's degree, teaching full time, and racing was too much for me so I had to nix racing to maintain my mental health.

Now I am back in th gym, learning from my past mistakes, and ready to train for another season. Right now I am still in the adaptation phase, but our season is so long I'm not stressing it.
The best lesson I have learned about the weight lifting phase is to never lose form in order to put more plates on to look "tough."

Thanks for the primer on the book, and enjoy the weights!

Keep in touch on the board too.
MTBDoc-it's nice to hear you are getting healthy and doing well-take care and Happy Thanksgiving.

Anyone thinking about Sea Otter yet? I just got my email registration.
FA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,910 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
mtbkendall said:
Hey Bro and Hey MTBDOC,

In my hypertrophy phase, just started. I maxed out plugged into the spreadsheet and headed to the gym. I could not complete the # of reps as listed at the certain percentages. I did on the first 3 sets but after that I was only getting to like 6 or 7 reps. Should I lower the weight and get the reps, or keep the weight and just keep doing what I can. Which is the most important??

by the way, I did a race at the end of my prep phase and smoked the class by like 4.5 minutes on a very hilly course. I really think the weights helped but more than anything I think the lower back and ab worked really had a factor in me feeling so strong on the climbs. Thanks BK
My opinion is that if you can do 6 sets of 12 the weight is too low, if you can't do 6 sets of 10 the weight is too high. I'm always adjusting the weights in the gym. Sometimes just to make it easier to rack.

The first day of hypertrophy is always a shock to me, espcially if done the day after estimating maxes. Don't be surprised if next week you are doing the weight at 6sets at 12 reps that you were only doing 7 reps today. It is amazing how fast your body reacts to this lifting program.

My one friend was telling me that his whole life he'd never been able to bench 2plates a side. And after being on this program he was able to do it in the strength phase.
 

·
XCdude
Joined
·
1,323 Posts
Hey kendall did you do the adaptation

mtbkendall said:
Hey Bro and Hey MTBDOC,

In my hypertrophy phase, just started. I maxed out plugged into the spreadsheet and headed to the gym. I could not complete the # of reps as listed at the certain percentages. I did on the first 3 sets but after that I was only getting to like 6 or 7 reps. Should I lower the weight and get the reps, or keep the weight and just keep doing what I can. Which is the most important??

by the way, I did a race at the end of my prep phase and smoked the class by like 4.5 minutes on a very hilly course. I really think the weights helped but more than anything I think the lower back and ab worked really had a factor in me feeling so strong on the climbs. Thanks BK
My son and I started using morris last year, and we were able to do the hypertrophy to 100% of all the listed porcentages and reps. This year we started without the adaptaion because we had been kind of training and it was much harder, we also had lost about 20% of our max weight when compared to our last year max. After 2 weeks we did a quick max check and we were higher than last years max.

So I´m guessing that if you dont do the adaptation you will not get a true max or like in your case you will have a hard time doing the whole program. By the way is almost imposible to finish it but you do somehow. We¨ll start our 4 week tomorrow .

Keep at it you will be stronger, using the spreadsheet makes it way easier, also read the book again.
 

·
Not Smart Enough to Quit
Joined
·
644 Posts
Ok ashwin, it's YOUR fault!!!

I was going to skip the weights this year and just SS and fixed gear ride all winter, but you have talked me into lifting. So it's your fault that i can't walk! Just kidding, as actually it's not that bad. I'm starting my third week of prep and will start hyper. in Dec.

I do have more Q's though. Here in the south I'm able to pretty much ride almost year round. I know that riding will be limited during the hypert. phase, but should I pick it up when I switch to strength? What about the SS riding? The SS seems like it would be a great way to convert gym strength into bike strength. Could it take the place of something like muscle endurance or even leadouts (some hills are almost like sprints as I try to maintain momentum)?

Also, I am planning to do some endurance type races (12 hour solo, 7 lap SS race at Southern lights 24/7) this year. If I throw in some long rides during my SMSP phase, will it slow my power development? If I go that whole cycle without long rides will my endurance be ok in the summer?

I would like a copy of that spreadsheet. I'll PM you an email address.

Thanks again to all who post on this board, as this info really helps me to stay motivated!

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,910 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
xray_ed said:
I was going to skip the weights this year and just SS and fixed gear ride all winter, but you have talked me into lifting. So it's your fault that i can't walk! Just kidding, as actually it's not that bad. I'm starting my third week of prep and will start hyper. in Dec.

I do have more Q's though. Here in the south I'm able to pretty much ride almost year round. I know that riding will be limited during the hypert. phase, but should I pick it up when I switch to strength? What about the SS riding? The SS seems like it would be a great way to convert gym strength into bike strength. Could it take the place of something like muscle endurance or even leadouts (some hills are almost like sprints as I try to maintain momentum)?

Also, I am planning to do some endurance type races (12 hour solo, 7 lap SS race at Southern lights 24/7) this year. If I throw in some long rides during my SMSP phase, will it slow my power development? If I go that whole cycle without long rides will my endurance be ok in the summer?

I would like a copy of that spreadsheet. I'll PM you an email address.

Thanks again to all who post on this board, as this info really helps me to stay motivated!

Ed
Hopefully the Mtb Doc will talk about his experiences with SS riding.

Last year I was short on time in getting started and with the first race coming in mid April. In addition the worst part of the winter was right when the endurance phase was coming. So Dave suggested that on the non-lifting days of the Strength phase to do some endurance work. One day at Xhrs the second day at 75% of X. And in the power phase in the book there is riding prescribed on the non -lifting days.

I hate leadout intervals and sprints because they hurt so much. But Dave made a point that these are some of the most important workouts for mountain biking. So this year I am going to try and NOT skimp on them and not replace them with Muscle Endurance workouts which I love.

Honestly I don't know how to tweak the program for more endurance based events. I really suggest calling up Dave and hiring him for a phone consultation just to answer some of your questions. It really takes a huge mental load off your mind when you get some answers that you can believe in and then move on with your life.

Though I do think that is ok to go those 3 week blocks of SMSP and MSP without any endurance work. As for me endurance riding seems to come back up to snuff within a very short time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
One problem that we have with SS racing is that no one has ever really quantified what it is that we're doing out there! Prior to the '96 Olympics, they had a LOT of data on the Conyers course from having people ride the course [race pace] with SRM's on the bikes. Dave said that a big part of Susan D's success was specifically targetted training for that course.

On the SS, we just don't know. Compound the fact that each course is likely to be a bit different. As I have posted elsewhere, I would like to add a wiring harness to my 29er SS and go out with my powertap and colllect some data.

As far as the weight work, JUST DO IT! It hurts...period. Suffer. Do your additional riding [short, higher power efforts are an integral part of the Strength and Power phases]. And, for some folks, we have to make changes. A very solid Cat 1 whom I coach keeps hurting his back on the weights, so we have been forced to do some things a bit different. And that is where coaching is helpful, when you can't follow a specific 'canned' program.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
wwwooooooo!!!!!

This hypertrophy phase is one of the mentaly toughest things I have done. I am about 2 1/2 weeks into it. wwooooo!! the 6 sets of squats just hurts!! I am playing with the weights to keep the reps up(thanks to ya'lls advice). Last week I did the heavy day and then the light day and was supposed to start the 2 days of rest when I remembered we have our first mtb winter time trial. I went out and rode an 8 mile lap for warm up on the SS. climbing was killing me, hamstrings were on fire!! started the time trial with one of buds that is pretty fast and was really worried that due to my legs hurting so bad he was going to be able to catch me...wrong!! I beat him by 9 minutes!! As bad as my legs hurt I really felt like I was climbing pretty good. I am scared to see what is going to happen when I phase my self out of the weights and start the intervals. I really have a lot of faith in this program. I think it is definetly going to take me to the next level..If I can just get thru this hypertrophy phase.

The only thing I am still confused on is training with power. as of now I dont have the capabilities and have thought about a power tap but just not sure which bike to put it on or how knowing what watts I am pushing is going to benefit me when I am on a bike that does not have the power reading capabilities.. I am going to keep researching it and watching ebay. I like MTBDOC's idea about the computrainer but dont want to have to buy a new computer to run it. anyway this program kicks butt!! later BK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,929 Posts
Concerning the strength phase...If I'm only able to use free-weights during strength-training, which exercises does everyone think would be best? I know it may be impossible to find my 1 rep max, as opposed to having a Smith machine.

Just wondering which free-weight exercises I can substitute, if any, for the curls, incline leg press, etc. besides simply doing lunges and squats.

Thanks for any thoughts.
Lou.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
599 Posts
Here's a thought on hypertrophy (long)

Being an avid muscle head and mtber, the most success I've had with building quality muscle is call EDT; Escalating Density Training. The type of training falls right in line with what both Ashin..and MTBdoc were talking about...it's the volume.

Here's how it works:

Take 2 opposing muscle groups. Let's say your quads and your hamstrings. Back Squats and Hack Squats (there is some muscle crossover with these 2 lifts, but hear me out)

You will do each lift one after the other, with a 30 second to 1 minute break between lifts and complete as many reps as you can in a 20 minute time period. You count your total reps and try to improve at each lifting session. Your sets x reps are as many sets of 6 reps as you can complete.

2 rules:

1. Use a weight you can comfortably lift for 10 reps (but only do 6 per set)
2. Once you have to struggle to complete a rep, you're done with that set.

This is a pure volume routine that will pump huge amounts of blood to your working muscle groups and solicit a solid amount of growth in a short period of time. IMO, it helped me develop muscular endurance without being on the bike as well.

Here's an example:

20 minute EDT Group #1: Complete lifts in alternating fashion for the entire work time.

Back Squat: Do a set of 6, then rest 30 sec to 1 min and then do Hack Squat
Hack Squat: Do a set of 6, then rest 30 sec to 1 min and then go back to Back Squat

20 minute EDT Group #2:

Leg Extension: Same as above, complete 1 set here, then move to Leg Curls.
Leg Curls

As you progress through workouts, your goal is to complete 10 sets of 6 reps for each exercise within the 20 minutes, or a total of 60 reps per lift. Continue to reduce the rest between sets/lifts and once you can complete the maximum # of total reps for the time period, increase your weight by at least 5%.

You have to play with this a bit and make it work for you. Personally, I shoot for 12 sets of 6 reps with 30 sec or less rest between sets before I move up. This will tax your lower extremities for sure and produce great results that can transfer over to the bike.

Just something else to think about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,910 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
mtbkendall said:
The only thing I am still confused on is training with power. as of now I dont have the capabilities and have thought about a power tap but just not sure which bike to put it on or how knowing what watts I am pushing is going to benefit me when I am on a bike that does not have the power reading capabilities.. I am going to keep researching it and watching ebay. I like MTBDOC's idea about the computrainer but dont want to have to buy a new computer to run it. anyway this program kicks butt!! later BK
You do not NEED a power measuring device. And a computrainer, tacx ergo, powertap etc. does not make one strong, but doing the intervals at a consistent power level does.

It is not important at all to know the exact # of watts you are pushing, unless you like to tell people I did this many watts. What is important is that you have some way of gauging your effort so that you are doing the intervals in a square wave pattern and doing the intervals at the highest intensity that you can maintain for the entire interval and for the entire interval session. Also having some method of gauging effort provides feedback in order to measure progress or the need to rest.

Yes a power tap, computrainer, or other device with power output is the easiest for gauging intensity. There are some newer ones out through performance/nashbar that have power outputs that are cheaper esp with a coupon.

But other methods include a standard trainer used with a rear wheel cadence monitor and speed sensor. Do the interval at a set speed/cadence. Or on a road or hill with consistent grade, ride at the same speed. You can measure the distance covered at a certain speed and time to guage your progress.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top