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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey there. Since my knees are still on the fritz from my last shenanigans I was thinking now is a good time to get some tips.

I've been riding up the Priest Rock Trail (Los Gatos) at least once a month and for the life of me just don't have the strength to get up the last few hills of the Dogmeat section that connects to Kennedy.

I don't wear clip ins but I've seen some guys up there without clips too. I'm a buck twenty in the weight category, am I too light to keep the bike down? Any balance or strength building tips/advice would be appreciated.

This climb quite wipes me out on that hilly section but its one of my big personal biking goals... even if it takes me a few years!

Thankx!
 

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That's a really, really tough climb to make. I can't imagine cleaning it without clipless pedals. Picking up a set would be my first bit of advice. It's also condition dependent, try it after a few solid rainy days when it's not so loose. I always hit a GU gel @ the Limekiln-Priest Rock intersection. Keep at it, it's a major victory when you make it. :thumbsup:
 

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Good on you to even attempt that section. Oh, also be real careful riding up, as the riders coming down are either out of real control, or close to it. Even if they wanted to stop, it would take many many many feet to do so.

If you're running out of breath, and that is what is stopping you, then I'd say keep trying, and specifically go slower leading up to the climb. Start out the climb as slow as you can, in the lowest gear as you can.
If you're slipping out, and that is what is stopping you, then keep inching fwd on the saddle during the climb. Do not stand up.

I can't imagine cleaning this on flats either, but I suck riding flats.
 

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Yeah conditions are really dry right now. Usually the only problems I encounter on this climb are traction issues (I weigh about a buck 30). Clipless pedals are almost a necessity to clear this climb IMHO.
 

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the bike doesnt float away on flat ground does it? then youre not too light. the key is keeping your center of gravity between the wheels. on the really steep stuff this usually means riding off the seat, in a crouched forward position. do this and try to keep a high cadence.

dogmeat is not an easy climb. ive only done it once, before i knew better. it was my first visit to the park. that should teach me to read the topo map a little closer.
 

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rox said:
my data says its 1.6 miles at 12% avg, but some spots are significantly steeper than that, like 25-30% grade.
Got it - sounds similar to No Way Hill in Wildcat. So the trick is maintaining traction and balance on the surface, versus negotiating any single feature or obstacle on the trail? Not that it's easy, as I have yet to clean No Way Hill...
 

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kittytrax said:
Hey there. Since my knees are still on the fritz from my last shenanigans I was thinking now is a good time to get some tips.

I've been riding up the Priest Rock Trail (Los Gatos) at least once a month and for the life of me just don't have the strength to get up the last few hills of the Dogmeat section that connects to Kennedy.

I don't wear clip ins but I've seen some guys up there without clips too. I'm a buck twenty in the weight category, am I too light to keep the bike down? Any balance or strength building tips/advice would be appreciated.

This climb quite wipes me out on that hilly section but its one of my big personal biking goals... even if it takes me a few years!

Thankx!
Those are some tough hills, but they are definitely doable.

I can't imagine cleaning that hill with flat pedals, as others have mentioned.

To build the kind of strength you need to make those last few steps, you need to consistently ride some steep/power building hills each week.

Gauging your effort between the steps is key as well; use the less steep sections between each wall to ride slowly and catch as much of your breath as possible.

If you are running too high of a pressure in your rear tire, you will spin out more easily. Just be sure that you have sufficient pressure not to pinch flat when you go back down. Running tubeless is even better.

Look where you want the front wheel to go; don't get fixated on the ruts, or you'll soon find yourself in a loose, dusty channel, which almost always means failure.

Bar ends and/or a lower handlebar height can help if you are having a tough time with the front end wandering. You won't need as much forearm/tricep strength to keep yourself over the front wheel.

Good luck.

-D
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Hmm, I didn't think about trying in out in tackier conditions, I will keep trying and give it a go this winter too, only tried it in summery weather so far.

I'm a complete derelict in clipin's, I've had them before and got too tired of falling over on climbs and at red lights. Much more comfortable on the platforms but this is one climb where I can see it would help.

My prob seem to be keeping rear traction, I'm trying to balance it right with weight forward. Right now it's slippery for sure. I can make it about 1/3 up the first hill of Dogmeat then it's outta my control. I do keep my eyes peeled too for the crazies coming down, that would be a huge wipeout that I would not want to take part in!

Think I'm gonna get back to some weight training, think the leg press will give me an advantage? And of course I should up my climbing more, auuuggh? I like the idea of snackin' at the intersection, better timing of energy.

Funny that I prefer to go up PR the whole way cause Overgrown (Limekiln) is so rocky but yeah, maybe I should go that way on my attempts to save some of the burnt leg power, shade is nice too and PR is a back burner most of the day.

If all else fails... my poison oak pills are steroids! Woo hoo, superwoman! :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
rox said:
the bike doesnt float away on flat ground does it? then youre not too light. the key is keeping your center of gravity between the wheels. on the really steep stuff this usually means riding off the seat, in a crouched forward position. do this and try to keep a high cadence.

dogmeat is not an easy climb. ive only done it once, before i knew better. it was my first visit to the park. that should teach me to read the topo map a little closer.
Funny... I did the same thing with Steam Donkey at Skeggs, First time was up and it was HARD!!! That's what I get for just glancing at the regular trail map. :rolleyes:
 

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El Castigador said:
Anybody have pictures of this hill?
hi - could you describe "no way hill" at wildcat to me.
i haven't been there since i rode beginner back in like, '91
also maybe a map pointing out location would be cool
you can be my online guide to all these cool hills
i pretty much stick around the mt. d., black diamond, lime ridge, shell ridge area
i need to expand my horizons....
 

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racerick said:
hi - could you describe "no way hill" at wildcat to me.
i haven't been there since i rode beginner back in like, '91
also maybe a map pointing out location would be cool
you can be my online guide to all these cool hills
i pretty much stick around the mt. d., black diamond, lime ridge, shell ridge area
i need to expand my horizons....
I haven't ridden it yet, but a recent thread covered it well:

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=220870
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
El Castigador said:
Anybody have pictures of this hill?
I hike up there too, here is a pic of Dogmeat looking up and coming down the last steep section. Photos always minimize the effect but it's a tough climb.
 

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MTB Monkey
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If you are slipping the rear tire, try dropping your elbows down so your arms are pointing straight back, so you are low and hunched over the bars, then pull back on the bar with each push on the pedals. Not up, but but a rhythmic tug back with each stroke. This will put a little more pressure on the rear wheel. Not ideal, but it helps to compensate for pedal mashing.
 
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