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Discussion Starter #1
Im looking to probably get a set of tires, grips, seat and possibly some riser bars... does anyone have any recommendations? I get some wrist pain on long rides. Im currently looking at getting a pair of thick slicks... its a roadbike ride i'll be riding on a mtb, and its all asphalt, all flat.
 

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My little friends
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If it's level, and you are riding with roadies, I would consider a bigger chainring, because you will be at a speed disadvantage because of your gearing.
 

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since 4/10/2009
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Don't buy new bars. Get some bar ends or some grips with bar ends or possibly some other attachments that offer alternate hand positions. You WILL want to move your hands around on a long road ride.

And don't just go and buy a new saddle right before a ride that's longer than any you've done before (assuming this is a longer ride than you've done before, since you're asking about it in the beginner's forum). That's a recipe for misery if you pick the wrong saddle. If you've been having trouble with your saddle, you should have been looking for a new one months before this ride. If you're lucky, you might be able to make it work out if you have a few weeks before the ride, and you ride enough leading up to it to properly test a new saddle to avoid riding 45mi with a torture device stuck to your butt if it doesn't work for you.
 

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Wanna ride bikes?
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Im looking to probably get a set of tires, grips, seat and possibly some riser bars... does anyone have any recommendations? I get some wrist pain on long rides. Im currently looking at getting a pair of thick slicks... its a roadbike ride i'll be riding on a mtb, and its all asphalt, all flat.
i'm a fan of ergo grips for the right application. if your wrists hurt i would combine that with handlebars with more sweep. (example: Ergon GP1 grips with Salsa bend II bars). i wouldn't get riser bars for a road ride, road bikes have drops not a rise. you want to be down out of the wind, not sitting upright.

why do you feel the need to change your saddle? unless your current saddle causes you pain, i agree you should NOT switch it right before a "long" ride. 45 miles on the road shouldn't take more than ~3 hours. if your not used to doing rides of that length (time wise) make sure you are prepared fitness wise.

don't forget a spare tube or patch kit, tire levers, and a pump, etc.
 

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Additional comments.
tires, I'd look at some hybrid/cyclocross tires. I have some Kenda happy medium 40mm (1.5") tires that I find work great on road/asphalt. Much lighter than the stock tires, but not as wimpy and easily punctured as road tires. Stock rims should be able to get down to a 30mm tire range no problem. Remember to get new tubes if you swap tire size. Your mountain tubes won't fit. I wouldn't get true slicks just because of the risk of rain. Always get something with tread.
http://www.amazon.com/Kenda-Happy-Medium-Cyclocross-Black/dp/B0081F4C00
http://www.amazon.com/Michelin-Prot...ie=UTF8&qid=1436293679&sr=1-5&keywords=700+40
http://www.amazon.com/Kenda-Kourier...ie=UTF8&qid=1436293679&sr=1-1&keywords=700+40


Handlebars, as stated, some of those bar ends are usually a good idea. I have some, and they really help. I also got some cheap silicone grips and put those over the bar ends. Very cushy and somewhat stress ball like to help relieve hand pain. Ergon grips for your handlebar are nice too.
http://www.amazon.com/Origin8-Comp-Lite-Alloy-Bar/dp/B00OZZZC8G
http://www.amazon.com/NuoYa001-Bicy...n&ie=UTF8&qid=1436293233&sr=1-4&keywords=foam

Seat. As mentioned, don't swap seats. If you're having saddle pain, try adjusting the angle one notch forward or backward. And the unspoke truth, chamois butter. it works. ask at your bike store for a sample pack or buy a single pack for $2.
http://www.amazon.com/Chamois-Buttr...&qid=1436293292&sr=1-3&keywords=chamois+buttr
 

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Discussion Starter #6
watts888, have you heard about the drought in California? im in the central valley, and there will be a bout .0000000001% chance of rain in august LOL

I will be safe with slicks. also i was looking at the thick slicks for that extra protection from puncture. being a desert climate, we have some pretty MEAN goat heads, so i may decide to run a lil slime as well.

I'll try adjusting my seat and taking it for some moderately long rides and compare. i'll look into the butter thing.

anything you think i should bring? so far im bringing a power pack, my phone, and got a phone mount (so i can track my ride) also picked up a suit.

teetering on weather ornot i want to go with a water bottle or a camel pack. I'll probably run out of water in the first 15-20 miles, so i'd need at least 2-3 bottles of water, which a camel bag can hold, but not sure i want to wear a camel bag.

thoughts?
 

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If it isn't windy then this should be a very leisurely ride of 3 hours and 2.5 hours if you push yourself just a little bit. Pump up your tires and maybe also your fork/shock. 45 miles in the mountains approaches epic but 45 miles on flat road is easy.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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Couple thoughts.

I don't think it makes sense to spend a bunch of money roading up a perfectly good mountain bike when serviceable older road bikes change hands for the same money. Say, $200ish, so we all know what number is in my head.

Unless you're going through water crazy-fast, three water bottles should be enough. Two in cages, one in a jersey pocket. If this is a supported ride, you really only need enough to get to the next aid station anyway.

If you haven't done some couple-hour road rides on your mountain bike before, this may get pretty far away from fun.
 

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watts888, have you heard about the drought in California? im in the central valley, and there will be a bout .0000000001% chance of rain in august LOL
Sorry, haven't heard of it. In Kansas City, we've got so much rain that a couple trail systems are physically underwater (people were kayaking on them to create messed up Strava trails). Since May, our trails have been closed about 90% due to muddy conditions.

2 water bottles, a couple packs of gu (or your preference for energy, I steal my kids gummy bears), multi-tool, patch kit, pump. Banannas rock. 3rd bottle in a jersey pocket or a camel back is your decision, but I'd go for a camel bak just for more water. It's going on your back either way. If you have frequent support stations, might not even need that 3rd bottle or camel bak. I will admit, not having anything on your back is much cooler in the hot sun.

For phone mounts, I have both of the following. I prefer the bag. It doesn't have as quick access to the phone's functions, but I can still see what's going on. Also lets me put stuff in the bag for easy access. The swivel mount one did allow great access to the phone's power button to turn it on and I could adjust the angle for visibility, but every bump would cause it to tilt. I wrapped some white plumbers tape around the ball & socket and it helped a lot.
Amazon.com: Roswheel Bicycle Frame Pannier and Front Tube Cell Phone Bag, 100gm, Green
Amazon.com: Arkon iPhone Bike Mount Smartphone Handlebar Mount for Apple iPhone 6 Plus 6/5S/5C, Samsung Galaxy S6/S5 Note 4/3 and HTC One M8: Cell Phones & Accessories
 
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