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Always in the wrong gear
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Seems logical. I've occasionally bought lubes, tubes and chains from Amazon (cheap 8sp chain for the SS not 12sp SRAM Eagle), but buying "real" parts like cranks, bars or a dropper from them seems...dumb.

I bought the vast majority of my parts from:
1) the LBS
2) the 'actual' company, e.g. my OneUp dropper and bars from the OneUp website.

I'd much rather directly support the brands I like and the shops I know and cut Amazon out of the loop. Screw Amazon.
 

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Thats nice to see. The internet is killing the LBS. Hopefully more brands follow their lead and help support local businesses. Its sad to see the lack of supply in shops and know that its because of (covid) and because you can find almost anything online. It not only affects (effects?) stores ability to supply customers, but also to fix their bikes, it screws with service which is the heart and soul of a bike shop, not selling bikes. I had trouble finding a chain the other day locally...I found one but still. Im glad PNW is making this step forward in improving the supply line to the local shops and not spAmazon.
-Paul
 
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ya like dags?
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Amazon's business model at this point is basically to trap companies into selling through them so that they can copy the product, have it made dirt cheap overseas and then use their algorithm to push their cheaper version to the top of the recommended pile.

I can't for the life of me wrap my head around why anyone would do business with them. Everyone is constantly losing their minds about China and patent theft, but Amazon is doing it right here and no one seems to care.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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40,957 Posts
Thats nice to see. The internet is killing the LBS. Hopefully more brands follow their lead and help support local businesses. Its sad to see the lack of supply in shops and know that its because of (covid) and because you can find almost anything online. It not only affects (effects?) stores ability to supply customers, but also to fix their bikes, it screws with service which is the heart and soul of a bike shop, not selling bikes. I had trouble finding a chain the other day locally...I found one but still. Im glad PNW is making this step forward in improving the supply line to the local shops and not spAmazon.
-Paul
No, the LBS failure to adapt is killing the LBS. Change is a constant of business. Unless you have some sort of wild niche, like making Rolex watches, someone will always come along that does what you do faster, more efficiently, cheaper, better, etc. The key is to keep changing and adapting to the new markets, trends, etc. Does the shop have their inventory on the internet so we can see what they have? Do they have community events like sponsoring races, skills clinics, mechanic clinics, shop-rides, BBQs, etc.? Are they making an effort to keep stock on hand? These are just a few of the things they can do to reach the community and build relationships and business. Yes, the internet is here and it's not going away. Yes, you might be able to order something cheaper somewhere else, but there are reasons to get it from your bike shop too. If the bike shop makes sure you have no reasons, well then they deserve what they get.
 

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I have only found a couple things in the last year that my LBS didn't have for the exact same price as Amazon. They also have perpetual inventory software that allows you to see what's in stock. Most LBS in the country use the same software with a little wrinkle to make it look personalized. My LBS experience is better than it was 10 years ago, no question, but they are all struggling because so many people just automatically go to Amazon without even looking around.

Amazon made a lot of sense years ago when everything you purchased, bike or otherwise was significantly cheaper. That's not the case anymore by a long shot.
 

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I have only found a couple things in the last year that my LBS didn't have for the exact same price as Amazon. They also have perpetual inventory software that allows you to see what's in stock. Most LBS in the country use the same software with a little wrinkle to make it look personalized. My LBS experience is better than it was 10 years ago, no question, but they are all struggling because so many people just automatically go to Amazon without even looking around.

Amazon made a lot of sense years ago when everything you purchased, bike or otherwise was significantly cheaper. That's not the case anymore by a long shot.
I find that if I buy a part from Amazon, when I call to ask some questions about the install, they are particularly unhelpful. :LOL:

The LBS on the other hand, is full of people who ride and who, if asked nicely, will offer opinions, facts and advice.
 

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I have a 6 year old and a 2 year old pretty much permanently in tow, so "popping down to a shop" is a bit of a production. I do it for things I need rightnow, but anything that can wait a couple days I order. Though I do most of my bike stuff ordering direct from manufacturers or bike store websites, like Cambria or Thunder Mountain, because their prices are the same and I'm confident that I won't receive a counterfeit part.
 

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ya like dags?
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No, the LBS failure to adapt is killing the LBS. Change is a constant of business. Unless you have some sort of wild niche, like making Rolex watches, someone will always come along that does what you do faster, more efficiently, cheaper, better, etc. The key is to keep changing and adapting to the new markets, trends, etc. Does the shop have their inventory on the internet so we can see what they have? Do they have community events like sponsoring races, skills clinics, mechanic clinics, shop-rides, BBQs, etc.? Are they making an effort to keep stock on hand? These are just a few of the things they can do to reach the community and build relationships and business. Yes, the internet is here and it's not going away. Yes, you might be able to order something cheaper somewhere else, but there are reasons to get it from your bike shop too. If the bike shop makes sure you have no reasons, well then they deserve what they get.
The fact that shops don't keep their inventory online is a big part of the reason I don't usually do business with them. I'm not going to call and sit on hold for 20 minutes trying to find out if you have the part I need, or worse drive across town just to find out you don't have it.
 

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Destroyer of Worlds
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I work the opposite from most people. I do my research online, then try to find the desired product locally. I'm not particularly price-sensitive, but I am all about instant gratification, so waiting for a shipment is a last resort.

I also won't buy anything online unless I have reason to believe the product is as advertised (which includes buying name-brand stuff). So I'll buy a new Garmin online, but not one of the much cheaper knock-offs on Amazon. Maybe I'm a Luddite. Maybe I'm just cautious.
 

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I find that if I buy a part from Amazon, when I call to ask some questions about the install, they are particularly unhelpful. :LOL:

The LBS on the other hand, is full of people who ride and who, if asked nicely, will offer opinions, facts and advice.
My guy at the LBS texts me constantly when things arrive, or if they have an update on when things are coming.

Just last week I was asking them about new tire, not in stock, could be a while, I get a text a the next day saying the rep for the bike brand took one off his personal bike and will just give it to me. If you support them, they know who you are and take care of you. I've also had above my comfort zone parts replacements in the past, they drop my bike right in the stand and they knock it out right then while we BS. I feel bad for all these people who claim the LBS is a miserable experience. It's probably because they buy everything online and show up once a year when they need something that minute.
 

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The fact that shops don't keep their inventory online is a big part of the reason I don't usually do business with them. I'm not going to call and sit on hold for 20 minutes trying to find out if you have the part I need, or worse drive across town just to find out you don't have it.
I'd honestly be surprised if they don't. Granted there are some that don't, but we have a dozen different shops here that all show inventory over many different bike brands. I also tried tracking down a bike earlier this year and looked up many different shops within a 10 hour driving distance, it's all the exact same software.
 

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Disgruntled Peccary
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I'd honestly be surprised if they don't. Granted there are some that don't, but we have a dozen different shops here that all show inventory over many different bike brands. I also tried tracking down a bike earlier this year and looked up many different shops within a 10 hour driving distance, it's all the exact same software.
I spent about 2 hours on the phone with local shops earlier this year looking for an X01 shifter. I finally found one. That's the kind of granularity I need. I build my bikes mostly, so I don't really care what full bikes are in stock.

I also had a shop fail to even call back when I said I wanted to order a fork. WTF?! (shop I'd worked with for years btw, note: past tense.)
 

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I spent about 2 hours on the phone with local shops earlier this year looking for an X01 shifter. I finally found one. That's the kind of granularity I need. I build my bikes mostly, so I don't really care what full bikes are in stock.

I also had a shop fail to even call back when I said I wanted to order a fork. WTF?! (shop I'd worked with for years btw, note: past tense.)
It's not just in stock bikes. You can tell if a chain or even a bottle of chain lube is in stock on the shelf. You don't have to call at all.
 

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Disgruntled Peccary
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It's not just in stock bikes. You can tell if a chain or even a bottle of chain lube is in stock on the shelf. You don't have to call at all.
Yea, literally one of the local shops has that. Most of the time, currently, it says "call for availability". Several others, you can easily track bottles, pumps, bottle cages, that kind of stuff, but that's it.
 

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Amazon's business model at this point is basically to trap companies into selling through them so that they can copy the product, have it made dirt cheap overseas and then use their algorithm to push their cheaper version to the top of the recommended pile.

I can't for the life of me wrap my head around why anyone would do business with them. Everyone is constantly losing their minds about China and patent theft, but Amazon is doing it right here and no one seems to care.
Read an article years ago and what you said is exactly correct. They highlighted a big shoe store that sold via Amazon. Amazon learned the product mix, brands, sizes, and colors that sold then moved in for the kill.
 

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It's interesting. I work in a business where a lot of my clients are in physical retail (i.e. retail stores). It's eerily similar to what Wal Mart did years ago to their suppliers. Basically came in with terms that weren't tenable but with so much volume that they could still dictate those terms. I actually had relationships with some suppliers that went out of business because of Wal Mart -- they scaled their business up significantly to accommodate the demand only to have Wal Mart completely terminate the relationship because they could save a penny getting it elsewhere. They were so leveraged from expansion that bankruptcy was the only out.

I think a company like PNW can make it work to walk away. A company selling widgets that lots of other people make pretty much the exact same thing maybe not. So perhaps there is some impetus on the consumer to say: this (Amazon) isn't the kind of business we want to patronize. IDK. That's a slippery slope.
 

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It's interesting. I work in a business where a lot of my clients are in physical retail (i.e. retail stores). It's eerily similar to what Wal Mart did years ago to their suppliers. Basically came in with terms that weren't tenable but with so much volume that they could still dictate those terms. I actually had relationships with some suppliers that went out of business because of Wal Mart -- they scaled their business up significantly to accommodate the demand only to have Wal Mart completely terminate the relationship because they could save a penny getting it elsewhere. They were so leveraged from expansion that bankruptcy was the only out.

I think a company like PNW can make it work to walk away. A company selling widgets that lots of other people make pretty much the exact same thing maybe not. So perhaps there is some impetus on the consumer to say: this (Amazon) isn't the kind of business we want to patronize. IDK. That's a slippery slope.
It may be a slippery slope, but I think it is a necessary one. Ultimately, if we stop acting like cattle with an ironic sense of autonomy, then we can start dictating the terms as a group. Meaning, we tell JB to go F himself. (Not you J.B. Weld)
 
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