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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just want to get some of your opinion.

Looking to get another bike. Currently have a 29er. I am curious about getting a 27.5 plus bike. With the options I see it's either a 27.5 plus tire with a xct/m/r fork or a regular 27.5 with an air fork. I still want to stick with a hardtail just for simplicity.

I ride single tracks mostly. I live in Miami.

Inputs appreciated. Thanks!

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singletrack easy terrain you could get away with a lower level fork, as long as you can get the fork stiff enough to reduce pedal box.

I have 27.5x2.8 tires and a Fox Rhythm. I wouldn't want a fork to be any less capable than the Rhythm is for what conditions I ride. The Rhythm seems like an okay fork. When I ride faster and/or with more challenging terrain I would not want a soft fork and say "my tires will be the rest of my suspension".
 

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My personal opinion ( or more accurately, preference) would be "regular 27.5 with an air fork". But, I am not a huge fan of plus tires. I just don't feel as playful on plus tires, and not as 'sure footed' for me. Again, personal preference. But that aside, I'd go with a better fork even if I liked plus tires more. Like Forest Rider said, I'd rather the fork do the suspension work versus a fat tire. Yet again, being in Miami... do you ride a lot of sand (like, on the beach)? If so, plus may be better.
 

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Since you have a 29er already, I bet there's a good chance you could at least fit a 27.5x2.8 in it. Maybe more, depending on the frame. Could play with 27.5 plus for a lot less money that way. Especially if you're just looking at budget hardtails, anyway.

IMO, extra tire volume works especially well for slower speed riding over things like chattery roots and such. IMO, bikepacking is an excellent use for big tires. The faster and more aggressively you ride, the more likely you are to fold over big tires, the more difficult it becomes for suspension to counteract the undamped rebound of bigger tires, and the more likely you'll encounter undesirable handling characteristics of self-steer.

Sand is something else entirely. I lived in E. TX for awhile and the trails in town were VERY sandy. The condition on some ranged from mostly well-packed sand that didn't really require extra tire volume, but WOULD wash out on you if you looked at it wrong to churned up sugar sand that wasn't worth attempting unless you had a fatbike. I've also ridden a bit in Michigan where some trails were also loose sand not worth the effort without a fatbike (coarse glacial sand, but still loose).

If beach riding is part of the equation, skip the plus tire and go straight to the fattest tire you can get for maximum flotation.
 

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IMO, extra tire volume works especially well for slower speed riding over things like chattery roots and such. IMO, bikepacking is an excellent use for big tires. The faster and more aggressively you ride, the more likely you are to fold over big tires, the more difficult it becomes for suspension to counteract the undamped rebound of bigger tires, and the more likely you'll encounter undesirable handling characteristics of self-steer.
I don't know. That sounds a bit overly simplistic. You can go pretty fast on plus tires, especially if you have enough air in them so they don't fold but not too much to get out of hand. That's my experience at least.

Having said that, going from an entry-level 29er to an entry level plus hardtail doesn't seem like it'd be worth it at all.
 

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I don't know. That sounds a bit overly simplistic. You can go pretty fast on plus tires, especially if you have enough air in them so they don't fold but not too much to get out of hand. That's my experience at least.

Having said that, going from an entry-level 29er to an entry level plus hardtail doesn't seem like it'd be worth it at all.
The spectrum is very wide on this and terrain and riding style factors play large roles. And it's exacerbated by low quality suspension components.

If OP is indeed on an entry level 29er already, he'd probably be better off with a better bike in general, regardless of wheel/tire size.
 

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The spectrum is very wide on this and terrain and riding style factors play large roles. And it's exacerbated by low quality suspension components.

If OP is indeed on an entry level 29er already, he'd probably be better off with a better bike in general, regardless of wheel/tire size.
Yeah, what the OP needs is an appreciably better bike. Tire size is kind of irrelevant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys for the input. I do have an entry level 29er which I upgraded to air forks, 2.3 and 2.4 conti tires (2013 Trek Marlin). I am keeping this 29er. I've had this bike for years.

I am getting another bike because my kids are into mountain biking. My daughter has a tokul 24 and my son has a 20" hotrock. My wife uses the 29er and I am left with a 1993 hardrock which i playfully converted to a single speed.

I am getting another bike technically for my wife, but I want to be able to get a better bike that I can use myself as well.

When you say a better bike in general, I am looking at the cannondale cujo 3, trek roscoe 6, DB mason 1, Specialized fuse, maybe he cannondale trail 3 all in the range of 1k
 

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I'd agree with the rest, something with newer geo and bit better parts would be the ticket. As to getting it for your wife, unless she rides more than just bike paths or smooth trail, I'd give her the Marlin and get the new bike for yourself. As to bikes to look at, the Roscoe is a nice bike, as is the Mason, but think you'd get better value for your $$ if you got the Mason and then upgraded the brakes to some Deore M6000s. Also the Mason has a 34mm stanchion fork vs 32mm on the Roscoe.

Thanks guys for the input. I do have an entry level 29er which I upgraded to air forks, 2.3 and 2.4 conti tires (2013 Trek Marlin). I am keeping this 29er. I've had this bike for years.

I am getting another bike because my kids are into mountain biking. My daughter has a tokul 24 and my son has a 20" hotrock. My wife uses the 29er and I am left with a 1993 hardrock which i playfully converted to a single speed.

I am getting another bike technically for my wife, but I want to be able to get a better bike that I can use myself as well.

When you say a better bike in general, I am looking at the cannondale cujo 3, trek roscoe 6, DB mason 1, Specialized fuse, maybe he cannondale trail 3 all in the range of 1k
 

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Thanks guys for the input. I do have an entry level 29er which I upgraded to air forks, 2.3 and 2.4 conti tires (2013 Trek Marlin). I am keeping this 29er. I've had this bike for years.

I am getting another bike because my kids are into mountain biking. My daughter has a tokul 24 and my son has a 20" hotrock. My wife uses the 29er and I am left with a 1993 hardrock which i playfully converted to a single speed.

I am getting another bike technically for my wife, but I want to be able to get a better bike that I can use myself as well.

When you say a better bike in general, I am looking at the cannondale cujo 3, trek roscoe 6, DB mason 1, Specialized fuse, maybe he cannondale trail 3 all in the range of 1k
OK, these details change things a bit. If you're getting a bike for your wife, I'd recommend getting a bike for your wife and let her pick it out. If you are getting a bike for you, then get a bike for you. Unless you're the same size of your wife and like your bike the exact same way, I don't see the get-a-bike-for-both-of-us strategy working very well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OK, these details change things a bit. If you're getting a bike for your wife, I'd recommend getting a bike for your wife and let her pick it out. If you are getting a bike for you, then get a bike for you. Unless you're the same size of your wife and like your bike the exact same way, I don't see the get-a-bike-for-both-of-us strategy working very well.
Totally agree. But she does not do technical trails. She just does straight paths. She is 5'4" I am 5'6" so we technically can share a bike.

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She is 5'4" I am 5'6" so we technically can share a bike.
No, you cannot. Even if you use the same general size, it's very likely that in addition to your 2" difference in height, you have notable differences in relative body proportions (torso length, leg length, arm length) that will result in even larger differences in bike setup. I would hedge my bets on you two requiring different sizes of bikes, even.

Let her choose a bike for herself and the way she wants to ride it. Why would you shove her onto a mtb if she's never going to ride it on singletrack? Sounds like a recipe to make her hate riding to me.

If you want a second bike, buy yourself a second bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
No, you cannot. Even if you use the same general size, it's very likely that in addition to your 2" difference in height, you have notable differences in relative body proportions (torso length, leg length, arm length) that will result in even larger differences in bike setup. I would hedge my bets on you two requiring different sizes of bikes, even.

Let her choose a bike for herself and the way she wants to ride it. Why would you shove her onto a mtb if she's never going to ride it on singletrack? Sounds like a recipe to make her hate riding to me.

If you want a second bike, buy yourself a second bike.
Lol thanks . We ride a lot on the road with our road bikes. She loves riding. She doesn't care for the trails and the mosquitos and mud, but our kids do. She is fine using my small 29er.

Yes I am definitely buying myself a bike for me. I mentioned her in the conversation because it's one of the reasons.

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As to bikes to look at, the Roscoe is a nice bike, as is the Mason, but think you'd get better value for your $$ if you got the Mason and then upgraded the brakes to some Deore M6000s. Also the Mason has a 34mm stanchion fork vs 32mm on the Roscoe.
Masons are pretty fun. I have a 2016 Comp, and it's sweet. DB has kind of gone to more entry level specs on their Masons, but the frame is mostly the same. The Sync'r is also worth a look, even if it's a little more than $1K.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've narrowed it down to the trek roscoe 6, Cannondale cujo 3 and the Cannondale trail 3. The trail being the only non plus tire. It's on sale now the same price range as the other 2 around $800. The main advantage of the trail is the Rockshox Judy air fork. While the other 2 plus tires are suntour xcr/m coil forks.

I'm gonna feel how they ride this weekend and see from that.

I saw some Craigslist options like a specialized fuse with air forks and dropper seats for less than $800 but it's a medium. Based on the geometry I Can fit it.

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You ARE kidding right? :eek:ut: Of all the people that PLUS are suited to, the beginner/less skilled rider is the top of the list. They aren't going fast enough to feel/have to deal with moon bounce, but they will feel the added cush and traction from the bigger tyres.

Are you confident your wife will enjoy the ride quality of a plus bike?
Without knowing her skill level, the plus tires may not be her preference. They bounce quite a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Are you confident your wife will enjoy the ride quality of a plus bike?
Without knowing her skill level, the plus tires may not be her preference. They bounce quite a bit.
She might end up with the older 29er

But to your point, she doesn't go fast on the trails, she really slows down... And I think it will benefit her a lot since the bumps are not as much.

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I think the bounciness is overplayed anyway. I rarely notice it on the trail as long as my tires are somewhere in the PSI sweet spot. I ride on a plus hardtail what everyone else rides around here on FS and am not slow or unskilled. I don't know that I'd want plus tires on a FS, but they're definitely worth considering on a hardtail to soak up some of the chatter. The tamer the trails, the more the fatter tires become a liability.
 
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