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Pivot 429 Owners: Superboost Impressions?

2879 Views 27 Replies 14 Participants Last post by  ljgmdad
I'm curious what Pivot 429 riders who previously had a boost drivetrain think of superboost.

The rear wheel will clearly be stronger, and superboost hubs/cranksets are readily available these days, so the only downsides I can imagine are:
  • Can't swap in a boost wheel if you have multiple wheelsets.
  • Slightly wider crankset Q-factor and potential for more heel rub on the drive-side chainstay.
I don't really care about the first item, but I do wonder if people coming from a boost drivetrain notice the wider cranks and more heel rubs.

On a related note, has anyone tried using a standard boost crankset on the 429 for a better chainline?
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I rode the last version of the Pivot 429 for a couple of years and never had a second thought about super boost. At 190 lbs, I never had to have the rear wheel trued up, tightened. I never had any squeaks from the rear wheel or BB. Good to go.
Heel rub is definitely not an issue. Maybe if you have size 20 feet 😂. But with size 11, I'm not even close to any sort of heel rub on the chain stay. Wider Q factor, maybe? All I can say is the Q factor is fine for me. I don't even offset my cleats as much as I could to narrow my stance. BTW, I think most people have too narrow a Q factor. I see bowed out knees on the trail all the time. But that's another discussion.
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I'm curious what Pivot 429 riders who previously had a boost drivetrain think of superboost.

The rear wheel will clearly be stronger, and superboost hubs/cranksets are readily available these days, so the only downsides I can imagine are:
  • Can't swap in a boost wheel if you have multiple wheelsets.
  • Slightly wider crankset Q-factor and potential for more heel rub on the drive-side chainstay.
I don't really care about the first item, but I do wonder if people coming from a boost drivetrain notice the wider cranks and more heel rubs.

On a related note, has anyone tried using a standard boost crankset on the 429 for a better chainline?
Not with the 429, but I had a Boost crankset on my Mach 6. Used 3 RaceFace spacers on each side (I was at a bike park and needed an immediate fix and a SB one wasn't available). Felt fine, rode find. Not much of a noticable difference from the X01s I had before.

As far as going from Boost to SB, I can't tell much of a difference going back and forth between the two standards.

I'm on 165mm GX SB cranks now. Heel rub has been a non-issue.

Like a lotta premium bike brands, Pivot's tolerances are as tight as you'll find in the industry, and I had some concerns about SB and press fit, but quickly realized it's just not a thing worth basing your decision on. I take really good care of my bike, but it's been through a good amount of abuse since I got it last July. It's as quiet and smooth as the day I bought it though, and if/when I decide to upgrade my trail bike, it'll most likely be a 429. It's a sick trail bike!
I have SB on my FB29 and I can feel zero difference when swapping back and forth between that and my TR11 and SC V10, both with boost. 10.5 size shoes.
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My size 14 feet rub on the chain stay. Of course, they did on my last non-superboost bike as well.
My size 14 feet rub on the chain stay. Of course, they did on my last non-superboost bike as well.
Wow. All the way back by the derailleur? Those are huge feet!
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I noticed the wider q-factor, and was a bit surprised I did. I also noticed it on my fat bike, but I expected to there. I put the seat down 5mm from my regular height without any issues. No heel rub.
Wow. All the way back by the derailleur? Those are huge feet!
I mean...they are big they are not clown feet. LOL. I only rub on my heel about 4 inch up from the derailleur. Thinking about it maybe I have bad form but I have found if I shift my feet more straight forward I get knee pain.
Here my size 11 next to the chain stay. Tons of clearance.

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On all my previous bikes with boost I always rubbed my right foot mainly on the chainstay. On my FB with superboost, there is no way I will get to rub the frame, way more room for my heels.
I have a Switchblade V1 with superboost, don't really notice the difference between that and the boost Fuel EX9 I ride. Size 11.5 shoe doesn't hit the chain stay on either bike. I do ride the SW pretty hard so maybe that wheel takes a better beating? I'm 6' 215lbs.
No heel rub with size 13. Ran boost XT on my V1. Some boost cranks will fit with an appropriate chain line.


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I mean...they are big they are not clown feet. LOL. I only rub on my heel about 4 inch up from the derailleur. Thinking about it maybe I have bad form but I have found if I shift my feet more straight forward I get knee pain.
I do the same thing. Don't rub my heal (size 10) but that's how I position my feet too, for the exact same reason. Bad form, but works for me.

We'll never be able to run clips that's for sure!! Not that I'd want to, but still...
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I’ve ridden a fb29 and a switchblade, didn’t have heal rub on either. But my calves rubbed the seat stays more than usual. Granted my mojo3 my calves have rubbed the paint off the linkage so


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I was the OP of this thread. I'd like to flip it around and ask what benefit do 429 riders notice from super-boost, if any?

On a related note, GMBN released a video today on MTB standards. The mechanic (Doddy) briefly mentioned super-boost at 6:20. He's no fan of super-boost.

"I really hope we don't see more super-boost. There's a standard we can live without. We just don't need the backend to be wider for a nominal amount of benefit. It doesn't add up to me."
As I said before the pivot super boost chainstay is the first one I don't hit my heels on for whatever reasons and the back end feels stiffer.
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"I really hope we don't see more super-boost. There's a standard we can live without. We just don't need the backend to be wider for a nominal amount of benefit. It doesn't add up to me."
Why not? What's the downside? I certainly wouldn't want to change how my 429 rides.
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Why not? What's the downside? I certainly wouldn't want to change how my 429 rides.
Yeah I don't see the downside. Even a nominal gain is better than no gain, and if availability and compatibility isn't an issue, which it hasn't been, I don't see why a consumer wouldn't want it as an option.

I think that answer was more about overall bike standards and having it be more universal, especially when differences are so small.

I tend to disagree with that though, as sometimes that's how things progress. As a company or industry it might make sense, but for the consumer there's been no downside.

As far as what benefits I notice, as has been discussed, it's hard to tell and minimal. My bike feels stable, but it's not easy to hop on a completely different bike with 148, different geometry, then go back to mine and be able to spot the difference.

You'd need the same bike or something with a very similar setup (tires, suspension, etc) and geo in order to properly compare, and even then the differences are gonna be subtle.

For me personally, it's just not something I really consider when choosing a bike. I go off feel, and if it just so happens to be 157, then great. Not something I seek out or really notice though.
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Too many variables to tell any difference attributed to just the stiffer wheels. Beefier tires, stiffer frame, etc.
Small feet, so not an issue. No alternate set of wheels.
Also shorter cranks than previous bike, so can’t feel the difference in chainline.
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