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Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
my friend will finally finished his singlespeed project lastnight (he kept putting off making the fork brace for his Specialized Futureshock FSX fork). The project was built around Oryx Team hardtail frame, True Temper OX Gold butted chromoly (will works at an Oryx dealer, so he's been getting a bunch of the frames for me and others REALLY cheap, in unpainted form). This is how the frame looked bare....







And this is how it looked after he painted it and assembled it with a mix of newish and retro-ish parts...







The neon pink and 3D violet parts were sourced to a large extent from me (go figure the odds of that), including the Ringlé cage, ATAK 28H hubs, Ambrosio CC22 rims, tektro CNC levers, grab-on lever covers, ODI Tomac Attack grips, and Clark's cable housing.

In case anyone else wants to do something similar, I ordered a half dozen of the frames myself and will likely be custom painting and building one for myself, and selling the rest (unpainted). The frames are direct-brazed and tig-welded, and are quite beefy construction (5.3 Ibs unpainted for a 19.5" size). Sizes available will be 17" and 19.5", and possibly 21" (I only ordered one 21 so far, for myself, but can probably order a few more).

If folks are interested in knowing more about the frames, they can PM me.
 

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Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
(Tom) said:
Ughh My eyes !!!! :cool:

Now that I think of it I actually have one of those FSX forks down in the cellar !
mtnwing over in the vintage forum pays high premiums for those things.
 

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Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
gonzostrike said:
joining technique on that frame? looks brazed but there's not a fillet. looks like someone cut tubes for using lugs, skipped the lugs, and just used a tiny bit of silver to fill the gaps.

can you explain?
Its called DBS. Direct Brazing System. Used by Procycle in their factory in quebec (procycle is the parent company for balfa, rocky mountain, oryx, miele, velosport, mikado and a few other brands I can't remember right now), and essentially they drop a ring of brass down the tube on the inside, press the tubes/joints together, apply heat, and voila... the ring melts and evenly fills the gap all the way around. That's why it looks so tiny (for a brazed frame).

The technique works, and works well. These frames have been raced by the Oryx Pro Team at World Cup races and Bill Hurley won his 1999 and 2000 Masters class World XC Championships on this series of frame. Pretty much everything is brazed onto them except the disc mount, which gets tig-welded onto the stay.
 

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pretty interesting

I'd like to see some pics of the process. miters are tight-looking, so I'm wondering how they keep it fixtured while they join the tubes, and I'd like to see the process step by step. sounds like a nightmare of complexity to design at first, but then a quick process to implement when well-designed.

no need to sell me on brazing strength, I know fully well that brazed joints are equally as strong as TIG- or MIG-welded ones.
 

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Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
well they were using it on everything from $199 department store bikes to the pro team frames within a few years so I gather they have quite the factory setup. I've never seen the operation myself but that's how Will described it to me (he's been to the factory). I wonder if they give tours. Googlesearch procycle, maybe they have pics / videos of the procedure on the website.
 

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Talk about funky! Yeah baby! Yeah....

But why twisty spoke the rear wheel? Surely you will be having spoke issues in the long run (not to mention a lot of noise) as the spokes are pulled straight under torque. You'd have been better off tying and soldering at the third cross if you wanted additional lateral stiffness.

Just curious?
dd..''

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Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
dodjy said:
Talk about funky! Yeah baby! Yeah....

But why twisty spoke the rear wheel? Surely you will be having spoke issues in the long run (not to mention a lot of noise) as the spokes are pulled straight under torque. You'd have been better off tying and soldering at the third cross if you wanted additional lateral stiffness.
You apparently don't understand how twisted spokes work because they do NOT pull straight at all under torque. Tying and soldering is in fact, a complete wive's tale when it comes to documented effects. I myself have twisted spokes like that for TWELVE YEARS and not once has there been any failures, problems, or noise.
 

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DeeEight said:
You apparently don't understand how twisted spokes work because they do NOT pull straight at all under torque.
Ok Princess, whatever you say.

Because you are such an expert at wheelbuilding, why don't you educate us all on how the force is transferred through the spoke from the hub to the rim on a rear wheel as one pedals a bike up a hill.

Eventually you will find that the spokes do want to straighten as they are tensioned by the rotational force placed on the hub. Why? I'll give you hint... it is the same reason a professional wheelbuilder laces the drive-side flange such that as torque is applied the rear wheel, the trailing spoke straightens (as tensioned) and moves the leading spoke inward away from the chain/derailleur. Same idea as applied to the braking side of a disc hub.

Maybe you ought to consult a text on the physics of wheelbuilding before you make comments that will demonstrate your TWELVE years of incompetence. ;)

And actually, if you care to research the case further, there is documentation quantifying the effects of tying and soldering. But this is again an example of your ignorance.

dd..''
 
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