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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having tried a few full sussers, and decided they're not for me, I'm thinking of putting a Pike Dual Air on my Kona Hoss - is this a bad idea?

I do as much climbing as descending - will the change in head angle make climbing a pain?
 

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Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
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honourablegeorge said:
Having tried a few full sussers, and decided they're not for me, I'm thinking of putting a Pike Dual Air on my Kona Hoss - is this a bad idea?

I do as much climbing as descending - will the change in head angle make climbing a pain?
It shouldn't; that's one of the best things about the Pike and it's adjustable travel - if you use that feature. Drops the front end down 45mm and steepens up the head angle.

As long as your frame can handle a fork with that travel range without messing up your warrantee, go for it! (not sure what that bike comes with stock, and its crown-to-axle height.)

My hardtail setups have been getting taller and slacker over the last few years; like anything else, you get used to it. I now far prefer riding in general with a fairly slack head angle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks - sound good. Kona say a longer travel fork is fine, warranty wise - anything short of a triple clamp, basically - just worried about how it'll ride.

Excuse the newbie question, but what exactly is meant by a "slack head angle" - as in head tube tilted more to the back wheel?
 

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Yup, head angle is the expression...

of the relationship between the head tube and a line drawn from the rear drop out to the drop out of the fork. It's expressed in degrees. The thing that can be confusing about head angle numbers is the way the numbers work. You have to remember that head angle is measured from behind the fork as shown in the illustration below, and is based on 0 to 90 degrees. 0 being flat or parallel with the line and 90 being vertical or perpendicular. So a slacker head angle has a smaller number than a steeper head angle. The closer to 90 degrees the head angle is, the quicker the handling will be, the slacker or further from 90 degrees the slower the handling. Usually 70.5 to 73 degree head angles are considered steep, and are used primarily on XC/Race bikes, 69 to 67 degree (some times as slack as 65) are generally used on Down Hill bikes. Steep head angles provide snappy, quick handling for tight technical single track. Slack head angles provide slower predictable steering and greater stability for descending. I personally prefer head angles in the 70 to 69(some times down to 68 depending on the bike) degree range. They provide the best compromise between sharp handling and stability, without being too twitchy or sharp on the down hills, or too slow in the technical.

Anyway, in the illustration below, the circled angle A is where head angle is measured. Hope this helps you out.

Good Dirt
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks...

Thanks - that's explained it perfectly.

So, according to Kona (http://www.konaworld.com/tech/technical_downloads/documents/2006_Geometry.pdf), my Head angle is 69.5 degrees, and I've got a 100mm fork
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The pike's 30mm longer than my existing fork (Dirt Jam comp) - so that equates to about a 1 degree change, or thereabouts, so 68.5-ish - reasonable enough?

Sounds good to me.
 

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It's not just the travel that affects how long the fork is. My Pike is shorter than my old Marzocchi DJ at 130mm travel. The Pike does have a fairly short axle to crown compared to some other forks. Marzocchi forks tend to be taller.
 

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I have a Pike equiped HT

I put a Pike on my Chameleon last season and love it. The adjustability of the Pike is excellent and I can drop from full extension to miminum on the fly. You do have to stop and get off the bike to crank it back to 145 mm though. Overall, this is a fork that is at home in many situations.

In any case, the geometry of the Chameleon lends itself to a long travel fork. I also have 2.5" Nevegals and 8" discs so the bike is set up for aggressive riding far in excess of my capabilies. However, this allows me plenty of leeway in technical stuff.

As long as the Hoss is not designed for a much shorter travel fork, I think it would work very well. You will have to build up a new front wheel with a 20mm axle unless the new Pike is different than the one I bought last season.
 

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honourablegeorge said:
Yeah - the Pike is 40mm longer in terms of travel, but only 30mm longer axle-to-crown.

That's one of the reasons I'm choosing the Pike rather than the Marzocchi Z1's.
Preferably a U-turn Pike, so you can lower it for climbs and tight singletrack (if the steering ends up a bit slow at max travel).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Rev Bubba said:
As long as the Hoss is not designed for a much shorter travel fork, I think it would work very well. You will have to build up a new front wheel with a 20mm axle unless the new Pike is different than the one I bought last season.
Nope, Hope Pro II Hubs on Maxic 819s is the plan,
 
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