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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been lurking around here and planning to build my Mojo. I am going the AM route and been thinking if this combo will work on the Mojo. if those 2 components can compliment each other, can I still get my bike to weigh below 27lbs? what components can you guys recommend besides the 2 that can get my bike lighter?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Jerk_Chicken said:
What's your definition of the type of riding you'd build a sub 27 pound "AM" bike for?
my type of riding includes a 3-5 mile single track that is rooty, rocky, filled with tight switchbacks, 800' to 2700' of elevation. And the reason why I was asking is I want to have fun also on the descents. I am after the plushest ride I can have and I think I can achieve this with the 2 components I mentioned.:)
 

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dromayn said:
Been lurking around here and planning to build my Mojo. I am going the AM route and been thinking if this combo will work on the Mojo. if those 2 components can compliment each other, can I still get my bike to weigh below 27lbs? what components can you guys recommend besides the 2 that can get my bike lighter?
No is the simple answer on those components.

I've just finished a Mojo build with carbon bars, juicy ultimates, Pike 424 Air, RP23, Thomson Post & Stem, XTR cranks, X0 rear and Mavic Crossmax SX wheels and it weighs 28.8 lbs now. I can put a lighter saddle on and am changing wheelsets to a Mavic / Hope Pro 2 combo which will shave about 300g off, but also adding a Joplin seatpost which will make it go up a little bit.

If you add the CCDB and Pike Coil, I can't see you getting a AM build for under 29 - 30 lbs IMHO.
 

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My Mojo with 454 coil fork and Vanilla RC with ti spring (similar weight to ti sprung CCDB), both Push tuned, and solid AM duty wheels using Stan's tubeless system, FSA Afterburner cranks, well here's a recent picture... 31.2 lbs on a digital scale.

I don't see where I could shave more than about a pound lighter using about 750 gram tires like these and this coil fork and shock.
 

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dromayn said:
if those 2 components can compliment each other, can I still get my bike to weigh below 27lbs? what components can you guys recommend besides the 2 that can get my bike lighter?
Very very doubtful. You'd be compromising a lot if you have to get the bike at or below 27. A Mojo built up to "trailbike" specs will be about 29 lbs at least. Any less and it's going to be detrimental to the ride. For instance, you could probably get there if you ran wheels like the crossmax SLR's with 1.95 tires and ultralight tubes or tubeless, but that's a total mismatch for a "trailbike" or "AM" bike.

If you really really have to get the weight down BUT you still want a sturdy build (PIKE coil, CCDB), get some eggbeater pedals and a super lightweight saddle...all your other componentry would have to be carbon as well (stem, handlebar, seatpost). I wouldn't sacrifice the wheels or tires to get to that weight though.
 

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Hmmm...a lot depends on your weight. I am 155 lbs and I have a 23.1 Mojo and I have just got from a severe hammering in Fruita and it did just fine. So my weight weenie Mojo did AM just fine. I don't ride off big jumps but I have no interest in that.
 

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holding back the darkness
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For what its worth... I have never weighed my Mojo.
I'm pretty sure it's in the 25-29lbs range. I have no superultra lightweight stuff on there... well except maybe the saddle which does have titanium rails, and I did just add that tanky joplin seatpost monstrousity...
Anyway... my mojo rides like a 24lb racer. It feels light, agile, flickable even. I would bet that when riding it feels lighter than lots of much lighter bikes of a different design.
The mojo is a very light frame for what it is... but really that is incidental to its performance. Build yourself up one with your coil shocks and sturdy wheels and don't look back and do not put that thing on a scale. Just go ride it. Ride it and then come up with how much you think it weighs. Then if you really just can't resist go ahead and get out your little scale. But I warn you! IF you are the type of person who will take that information and say something like "Awesome.. can't believe it weighs that much!" and laugh and be happy then more power to you. However if you can see yourself saying "WTF!? I can't believe it weighs that much!" and that number will be there to plague you and to drag you down and provide convenient excuses on long, steep climbs... then maybe you'd better leave well enough alone.
 

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Hehehe, you obviously don't have the weight weenie addiction :D

I cannot help myself putting anything I get on my accurate scale for a weighing and then putting the parts into the spreadsheet and then comparing them against the hanging scales weight reading for the entire bike. Yea, I am weird, why the heck to I have the nickname Gram? :eek: :p

But if I have a part that doesn't last or is unreliable then out it goes. In the old days (10-15 years ago) a lot of cottage industry parts were light but not very reliable, now Shimano makes trick, reliable and light parts. Things are a lot better for the light parts aficionados.

Again I did Holy Cross, Mack Ridge, Troy Built, Moore Fun, etc in Fruita and I do regular ride locally here in Southern Colorado and I bash my Mojo hard and it is not fazed, I can get away with some lighter components cause I am 155 lbs, I don't use skinny tires cause they are useless in my local conditions.

My only excuse if I am felling weak on a long climb is that I am weak, might be a bad day, out of shape or still getting in shape. :cool:

Thanks for the compliment in the other thread subliminalshiver. Wow thats a handle! :eekster:
 

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dromayn said:
my type of riding includes a 3-5 mile single track that is rooty, rocky, filled with tight switchbacks, 800' to 2700' of elevation. And the reason why I was asking is I want to have fun also on the descents. I am after the plushest ride I can have and I think I can achieve this with the 2 components I mentioned.:)
That sounds just about exactly like XC. The CCDB is overkill and won't get you in your target.

You want to build a reliable xc bike, but you're falling victim to inflating your own riding category, something many do. An honest assessment is you're simply doing XC-leaning trail riding. In that case, you don't need a CCDB. You also want to get this supposed "AM" rig into the XC range, but using one of the heavier shocks on the market. Doesn't make sense. Why not just do the tuned RP23 thing? It's plenty reliable and durable in conditions even more extreme than that you describe.
 

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holding back the darkness
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Not much of a weight weenie... Not that there's anything wrong with that....I mean I respect every cyclists right to choose.:thumbsup:
Personally I know that like yoda said, once I start down the weightweenie path, forever will it dominate my destiny.. or something to that effect. So I just pretty much don't worry about it to avoid the huge replacement cost of all that heavy stuff on my bike:D .
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Jerk_Chicken said:
That sounds just about exactly like XC. The CCDB is overkill and won't get you in your target.

You want to build a reliable xc bike, but you're falling victim to inflating your own riding category, something many do. An honest assessment is you're simply doing XC-leaning trail riding. In that case, you don't need a CCDB. You also want to get this supposed "AM" rig into the XC range, but using one of the heavier shocks on the market. Doesn't make sense. Why not just do the tuned RP23 thing? It's plenty reliable and durable in conditions even more extreme than that you describe.
Well, I shouldn't have probably say AM. Now i am getting categorized since I am doing long climbs but my point here is I am looking for a build that when I descend I would not feel all banged up because my set up is XC. What I am after probably is a trail bike (to be safe ;) that falls in between XC and AM. As for durability, I know an RP23 is durable and can take the abuse that you throw at it. But I am after plushness of the ride and i think if derby can comment coil would make a plusher ride than air shocks. i am just collecting facts that might help me build a mojo that will suit my style of ride.
 

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Okay, you are definitely a trail rider. Means you like a low weight bike but it wont make you stop when you see some abusive trails, you want to rip that trail apart.

Well, this is what I suggest, a CCDB is overkill for general trail riding but if weight is a little concern and you got huge amount of money to spend on then by all means get the CCDB (that's like the coolest coil shock any rider can get now). If plushness that you want, I suggest you look for a lighter coil shock, I think the Fox Van Coil is lighter then DHX and it doesn't have those external adjustments (I don't think a DW-Link bike needs shock adjustment?).

Oh yeah and coil is definitely plusher then air but its also heavier because of the spring weight. I don't know but light coil forks is definitely getting less due to manufacturers going towards air fork. I don't know about how plush you want, but for general trail riding, I don't mind having an air fork and a coil shock due to I will want its low weight.

I think the Manitou 140mm fork will definitely fit the bill for a lightweight trail riding fork. Fox Van would be great if you are totally wanting to go spring. Anyone got comments on Marzocchi coil fork models?
 

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dromayn said:
Well, I shouldn't have probably say AM. Now i am getting categorized since I am doing long climbs but my point here is I am looking for a build that when I descend I would not feel all banged up because my set up is XC. What I am after probably is a trail bike (to be safe ;) that falls in between XC and AM. As for durability, I know an RP23 is durable and can take the abuse that you throw at it. But I am after plushness of the ride and i think if derby can comment coil would make a plusher ride than air shocks. i am just collecting facts that might help me build a mojo that will suit my style of ride.
If you're getting banged up on a bike like that with that much rear travel, you're looking in the wrong place by wanting to spend the biggest dollars first. Look in the simplest places like your damper settings. I would bet a lot of money that your bike is not set up right, or you're not setting it right for those particular descents. I'm also going to go as far as saying that if you're "banged up", then a CCDB will not help you. I own one, so I know the difference going from a DHXc, known for the spiking and inability to handle repeated sharp hits. The difference is there, but the downhill trails that bang me up still do it. The dynamics are very different, but in the end, any damper is only going to minimize what you feel, not provide you with "active suspension".

As far as the categorization goes, I didn't mean to sound like I was taking a shot at you, but assisting you in properly evaluating what you're doing with the bike. I won't get too far into the AM debate, but it is very true that many riders, perhaps the majority, inflate the type of riding they do. For example, a person bought a Marzocchi MX Pro 105mm fork from me a couple weeks ago. He described his riding and said it should work for him because he needs a heavy duty fork so he can go freeriding. I asked what he meant and he said doing some jumps (said jumps were 1 footers at the most) and going through some rocks (an area with two stones nearly fully submerged in the ground), and going over fallen trees (the area only had a couple young trees downed, at less than 6-8 inches above the ground, subsequently sanitized by the local grandma bike club with contours. Unfortunately, this plagues the community at large and the "AM" category has done exactly what the manufacturers wanted. It gave a category for XC riders to inflate their riding into without being easily shot down like if they were to say "I freeride".

This is why when someone asks about something, it's crucial to honestly and exactly describe what the trail features are to be able to return some valid information. Myself and my gf ride FR bikes on the lighter side of the builds, yet when we're asked about how certain trails are or about our rides, we describe them fairly and I don't believe we've ever told anyone we were "freeriding" or riding "all mountain" yet.

Coils can make plusher rides, yes, but there's more do it, such as the damper performance. I think you should start with the cheapest things first, and experiment for some weeks with the front and rear settings, along with your own balance on these sections. A CCDB feels and works great, but if you're not setting your shocks right now, wait until you see the CCDB. You'll never be able to tune it right, as it takes weeks to months to get it set. I also think the RP series has come a long way in shocks and deserves either some more time, or a possible tuning by PUSH. I believe Darren owns a Mojo and can steer you right for less $$$. You're likely going to get lots of talk from derby, but sort out the cheapest options first. The RP tuned might work even better than the CCDB, plus it will be lighter.
 

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Jerk_chicken, you got it all mostly correct. I read some forums and some people say they do freeride but they do jumps that normal trail bike can do. Some owns bike that can do aggressive trail riding but they don't even dare to tackle technical downhill.

I managed to tackle a lot of technical downhill (rock gardens and etc) that many people fear and I'm using an Anthem which has less travel then most of them. There are some riders that use hard tail to tackle rock gardens and do drops.

Thats why I am now learning some trail riding skills like proper way to jump and land, wheelie, riding drop off by jumping, tackling rock gardens at high speed because I want that when I own a Mojo, I would be able to use it to its full potential.

I find its harder to keep the front wheel lifted up when I ride my Anthem.

Its true when riders say, look into yourself and ask what kind of riding do you really do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
wheelhot said:
Jerk_chicken, you got it all mostly correct. I read some forums and some people say they do freeride but they do jumps that normal trail bike can do. Some owns bike that can do aggressive trail riding but they don't even dare to tackle technical downhill.

I managed to tackle a lot of technical downhill (rock gardens and etc) that many people fear and I'm using an Anthem which has less travel then most of them. There are some riders that use hard tail to tackle rock gardens and do drops.

Thats why I am now learning some trail riding skills like proper way to jump and land, wheelie, riding drop off by jumping, tackling rock gardens at high speed because I want that when I own a Mojo, I would be able to use it to its full potential.

I find its harder to keep the front wheel lifted up when I ride my Anthem.

Its true when riders say, look into yourself and ask what kind of riding do you really do.
If you guys think I'm a poser, well I think you are wrong. I know some people inflate stories as such but I am not one of them. If you want I can take you to one of the 'intermediate rides' I do. Check out Banner Forest or Tiger Mountain in the state of Washington and see if these type of trails are just for beginners. I have an XC bike right now and have played with whatever settings it has but still I am not contended with what it offers me specially going DH. I am not into FH or anything, all I am after is a plush ride going down and limit the aches and pain after the ride.

I will try to get my hands on a RP23 and play with it and do a comparo with a friends roco coil. I know that many people are complaining about getting the ideal setting on a CCDB but I know riders who own one that got there setting right and never need to adjust it again.

But anyways, thanks for the inputs for this has given me more options to try and test.
 
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