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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this isn't really a MTB, but after having back surgery and metal rods in my back, I needed something other than a MTB or road bike for riding trails and dirt roads around me in CO.

Tried a bunch of bikes (Specialized, Trek, REI, Cannondale). Settled on the Kona Dr Dew from a local retailer.

I really liked the geometry of the frame. The wheels/tires and the 1x 11 Derailler. Hopefully I can ride tomorrow afternoon.

I was really surprised how well this bike road with those big fat tires.

In CO it isn't usually too wet. Leave the fenders and kickstand on, or take them off? I'm thinking off, but maybe it contributes to the big tire/retro look.
 

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Hi,
Congrats on the new purchase! I'd leave both on, if you plan to use it as a daily commuter as well. Otherwise, if you want to use it only offroad, I'd take them off, to reduce weight and chatter.
 

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Cool, enjoy!

Personally, I'd try leaving the fenders on but remove the kickstand, unless you're going to use it a lot. I do have one on my folding bike. But if the fenders end up rattling, I'd remove them, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Went on a couple of rides. Had to ditch the stock pedals and put on SPDs.

Had an issue with the bottom bracket creaking when I pushed hard with my right foot. I think the LBS fixed it. Will have to try again on Monday or Tuesday.

Bicycle tire Bicycle wheel Tire Wheel Bicycle wheel rim
 

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Awesome bike to recover from surgery. Ironically, I had back surgery 2.5 years ago and bought a 2013 dew deluxe on craigslist as my recovery bike. I was only planning on keeping it around until I was well enough to ride my road and mtb's... but i developed an attachment for it and it has stayed in my fleet as my commuter and beach cruiser.

Bicycle tire Tire Bicycle frame Bicycle wheel Wheel
Bicycle tire Bicycle frame Wheel Bicycle wheel rim Bicycle wheel


I've also got another set of wheels/tires and this gets used as a touring and gravel grinding rig occasionally.
Tire Bicycle tire Bicycle frame Wheel Bicycle wheel
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ok.. 4 months in. Update:

My initial creaking issue was the seatpost. Greased it up and it is fine.

I had big issues using the WTB Horizon tires/Kona wheels tubeless with Stans. First, Front tire held air, but back tire had a slow leak. LBS tried more stand and re-taping. Even tried a new tire on the back. The thing that fixed the back was replacing the Kona rim.

So for the last couple of months everything has been great on tubeless. Then the front wheel develops a slow leak about two weeks ago. So I refilled with a small bottle of stans. Still leaking. Goes from 55lbs to 20 overnight.

I think I'm ready to throw in the towel on Tubeless and Stans at this point. I tried submerging the wheel in a bathtub and I can see a small leak near the edge of the rim. Not sure if there is anything a LBS can do for that and not sure if I want to keep fixing things with this.

This is a bike trail/gravel bike for me, so I think I might give up on tubeless.
 

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ok..
This is a bike trail/gravel bike for me, so I think I might give up on tubeless.
Don't! :) I've had my share of headaches with tubeless in the beginning. Here's what I learned:
- stans tubeless milk is ok, e thirteen as well. Friends have use Schwalbe milk with success as well
- stans rim tape is no good, dt Swiss is better. Praxis is also good, with the additional benefit that they are not glued to the rim and can be removed easily.
- tubeless ready rims are a must. I tried cheap non-tubeless ready rims too. It might work somehow, but too much of a pita in my pov. I now use wtb asym, wtb St and Praxis AL rims with good results. The praxis rims were shipped with their proprietary rim tape, which works well too.
- tubeless ready tires are a must
- valves: I've tried cutting out the valves from old tubes instead of investing in dedicated tubeless valves. It works but is more of a hazzle.

To address your issue: you could try to find tubeless ready rims that have the same ERD and hole count as the ones that are mounted on your bike. Then you can swap the stock rims for these new ones without having to buy new spokes. Put the new rim next to the wheel, unscrew spoke by spoke from the old wheel and screw it onto the new rim. True the wheel. Once done, tape the new rim with a proper rim tape, install the tire WITH a tube and let it sit over night. That should ensure that the tape is properly glued to the rim. Remove the tube on the following day, install the valve and tubeless milk. Go for a few rides. After two or three instances of air leaks, it should settle. I've done that multiple times with success.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The rim is supposed to be tubeless compatible. WTB STP i19 TCS 650b

I just put a bottle of Stan's in. I rode a bunch of times since then and it is still leaking near the rim edge. Is it most likely the rim tape? The tire? Or what? It worked perfectly for 4 month prior.
 

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The rim is supposed to be tubeless compatible. WTB STP i19 TCS 650b

I just put a bottle of Stan's in. I rode a bunch of times since then and it is still leaking near the rim edge. Is it most likely the rim tape? The tire? Or what? It worked perfectly for 4 month prior.
Hmm, if you say "near the rim edge", you mean between the rim and the tire, right? Sounds like the tire is to blame then. Maybe the tire bead has moved and is not seated properly any longer, or it is broken/ripped at the place where it is leaking?
Have you removed the tire completely and checked the rim tape for proper seating, and the tire for any damages?
 
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